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Recipes used for a new restaurant

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I am a personal chef, I have a website and a blog w/ a bunch of recipes. I have a friend who is planning on opening a restaurant and is interested in using me as a "menu consultant" and using my recipes. He is currently using my recipes to gather investments from private investors. Anyone knows on how much I should charge him on my consultancy in menu design?

Thanks so much for your help.
SM
post #2 of 15
Minimum $100.00 an hour. If your good, and have loads experience in food service
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ed for your response,
I was just wondering in term of equity, I created the recipes and someone else will use them in a restaurant for business and make a profit out of it, so I thought if there was some other compensation I should be entitled to.
Thank you!!
SM
post #4 of 15
Hi, Did you invent a New kind of food that needs a recipe. Most of the recipes that I have seen are so close, a person just needs to use what fits their taste the best. Is your blog open to all to get these recipes????????????? I have been a Plagiarist for 30 years in this business. I must owe a lot of money. If a Chef has a dish I like across town, its mine tomorrow................What kind of Chef that opens a Restaurant needs Recipes. I haven't used a recipe in years...................Bill
post #5 of 15
The OP didn't say the new business owner is a Chef.
And we know any idiot can open a restaurant.
It's the smart ones that are actually successful at it.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #6 of 15
But any compensation, IMO shouldn't go beyond the services and time provided by the consultant in the first place. You're not publishing an album, there are no royalties to be collected everytime they make a dish; all you're doing is consulting them with regards to making recipes and specs so that cooks can replicate them. If you want dividends I suggest you put some money into the business yourself.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #7 of 15
Hi there, I have been approached on numerous occasion to st up restaurant and give advice, I have mentioned before that I a not a chef, I have friends who are in Café restaurant business and often pressure me to get involved, Restaurant business is exceptionally competitive and in the incipient stages it is a struggle to establish a reputation and secure a loyal customer base! Given the locality, milieu and nowadays the unfortunate beak economical out look, I would not charge what I call "My Friend" a fee, rather would proceed on the path of ethical conduct that would befit a friendship, allow the restaurant go ahead see if it can survive, then ask for money if the business is returning a decent profit! Some restaurant tend to close down within a month and leaving a bitter legacy!
You can come to an arrangement with your friend and ask for a lump some payment! pending the success!
Please note, this purely my advice , and advice is nothing to be taken seriously it is just an opinion!
Every one has subjective and objective opinion, so it purely there as a reflection on the culinary business!
Having said that, wish you and in particular your friend a total success!
post #8 of 15
I have a friend opening a soup/ sandwich place in a small town who has asked me for help with soup and salad dressing recipes. I have given her ones similar to, but not the same as mine as I manage a restaurant and feel it would be a conflict of interest to give her my same formulas. She could look these things up on her own, but knows I can tell a good recipe from a bad one by looking at it. What she mostly needs anyway is large batch formulas, so that's what I'm giving her along with intenet sources where she can look herself.
post #9 of 15
Posts like this really kill me. People think you could just cut out a pattern and make it work. This is the hardest business to succeed in, it has the biggest failure rate of any other business. Ask and one on this site if it has been a road paved with gold in making their business a success. I bet the answer is they worked their Butts off for years making it a success. This is a time for people NOT to go into business, its hard enough for the successfull business to prosper, never mind having new business pop up that don't know what the heck their doing.
A good/Great/going restaurant is much, much,much more than good recipes. The people that I tell to go into business are the ones that already have a good idea, they already know their product and what to do with it..............Bill
post #10 of 15

I dunno about the use of your recipes

I am a personal chef, I have a website and a blog w/ a bunch of recipes. I have a friend who is planning on opening a restaurant and is interested in using me as a "menu consultant" and using my recipes. He is currently using my recipes to gather investments from private investors. Anyone knows on how much I should charge him on my consultancy in menu design?

Thanks so much for your help.
---

OK, first off, he's already using you for promotion. IMHO you should already be on his payroll for that because he's "promising" the recipes that you DO. Is he promoting the recipes that are posted (pretty much fair game), or you in particular? That's a grey area right there.

As a menu consultant? Does he want to use the existing recipes or just as an example of what you can do?

Bottom line is what do you think you're worth? A killer menu is the be-all and end-all of a restaurant.

Don't sell yourself short.

...and btw, pretend he's not a friend. Pretend he's just another person opening a restaurant and you'll get a better answer to the Q's you're asking.

April
post #11 of 15
The first thing is figuring out whether they can even reproduce your recipes consistenty in the restaurant.
You should also expect half the original menu items to be gone in 12 months.

Will you be involved with the restaurant on an ongoing basis, or just letting them use your name and recipes any how they wish?

Perhaps, start with a monthly retainer, produce valuable sweaty equity, and based on certain pre-determined parameters, move into a vested equity partnership.

If all they want is your recipes and that's all, sell them outright for whatever you can get from them. This route will offer the lowest reward but also the lowest amount of risk and time.
post #12 of 15
***"This is a time for people NOT to go into business,"***

Say what?
Start up costs are down, so is energy and other COG's commodities. Rents are lower, unemployment has improved the available talent in the labor pool, cost of money is low (what's left of it)...and so on.

Now, is a great time to start a business. Just make sure you have the capital available to weather the current storm.
post #13 of 15
Maybe in your world everything is great. This isn't the time to get into the Restaurant Business. I see by you putting (OTHER)You don't own a restaurant. Why don't you start a post telling everyone how wonderful everything is. The labor pool is Great, thats because a Restaurant layed them off. Cost of Money is LOW.... hahhahahahhahhhaha Go into your Banker and tell him your wonderful idea about opening a Restaurant. Maybe, just Maybe he will tell you about the failure rate in this business...................................Bill
post #14 of 15
An update on the friend who opened the soup/salad place. I thought she was nuts. She quit a good job in health care to do this. The town gave her some start up capital and the landlords went out of their way to accommodate her. They opened last week and so far it's going great guns. She makes all her soup and salads from scratch and people love it. The place is also near a bike trail that should bring in more business in the summer. The place is new, and the verdict isn't in for the long term yet but so far, so good. Maybe there's hope for us yet.
post #15 of 15
As much as he will pay you.
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