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What are some foods we shouldn't miss

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I will be in Spain twice this summer and Portugal once. I have never been either place and was wondering if anyone has suggestions on foods we absolutely should not miss while there? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks for all replies,

Cheesecakelady
www.amazingcheesecakerecipes.com
post #2 of 9
In Spain: ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham ham

and rabbit, too.

:p

Actually, there are many foods in both countries. If you look at José Andres's site about his book Made in Spain, you'll get some very good information. And even though I don't much care for the whole project, Mario Batali's Spain -- On the Road Again also has a lot of info about food there.

For Portugal, check out Leite's Culinaria. David Leite has a book coming out on Portuguese food. (And, full disclosure, he's a friend.)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 9
ham, cheese, bacalao/bacala,

paella (they have many kinds)

bananas (they have a lot of different bananas)

FRESH SEAFOOD!!!!! (if on the coast)

i want to know more about spanish cooking so i hop u share your experience with us
post #4 of 9
Get recommendations for good tapas bars, go at 8:00 pm (be sure to have a siesta to rest up), and then eat everything. If in doubt, ask what they recommend.

And ham.

And seafood.

And squid-ink rice.

Oh, and....

Just eat everything, and try to avoid repetition.
post #5 of 9
A great way to sample many Spanish dishes is to visit a Tapas bar. I went to a Tapas bar in Charleston last year and the closest the chef had been to Spain was a glass of sherry while he was cooking. Truly awful, I mean why call yourself a Tapas Bar and then serve absolutely nothing remotely resembling Spanish food?
post #6 of 9
i nkow i love these things in latin cooking:

* sancocho (soup)

* empanada/empana/caraminola/pastel/tamale (these are all parcels of some kind, either flour or cornmeal dough, or in the case of the caraminola, a yuca dough)

they are fileld with meat, cheese, fruits, meet and cheese or veggies and then steamed, fried, boiled or baked

bunuelitos - thee are fried
sweet or savory

usually a choix pastery

fried

then with a syrup drizzled over in cuba or puerto rico or dominican republic. light and delicious

but i hear there are savory versions too!!!


i would be interested in the spanish ancestors of these latin classics


post #7 of 9
mmmmm....paella.
post #8 of 9
Go to the local Farmes Markets, you can buy fresh killed Rabbits, Pigs, Chickens or the parts there of. and all the fresh veggies to go with that. Be like a local.
post #9 of 9
In Spain: try potato omelette ("tortilla de patata", "tortilla española" or just "tortilla"), paella, various stews, migas, sausages (such as embutidos, chorizo, and morcilla), jamón serrano, and cheeses.
There are also many dishes based on beans (chickpeas, lentils, green beans); soups, with many regional variations; and bread, that has numerous forms, with distinct varieties in each region. The regional variations are less pronounced in Spanish desserts and cakes: flan, custard, rice pudding (arroz con leche), torrijas, churros, and madeleines are some of the most representative examples.

Portugal is a seafaring nation with a well-developed fishing industry and this is reflected in the amount of fish and seafood eaten. The country has Europe's highest fish consumption per capita and is among the top four in the world for this indicator. Fish is served grilled, boiled (including poached and simmered), fried or deep-fried, stewed (often in clay pot cooking) or even roasted. Foremost amongst these is bacalhau (cod), which is the type of fish most consumed in Portugal. It is said that there are more than 365 ways to cook cod, one for every day of the year. Cod is almost always used dried and salted because the Portuguese fishing tradition in the North Atlantic developed before the invention of refrigeration - therefore it needs to be soaked in water or sometimes milk before cooking. The simpler fish dishes are often flavoured with virgin olive oil and white wine vinegar.

Read more at: Spanish cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Portuguese cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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