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mussels

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I would like to add mussels to my menu, but was wondering what a proper portion would be so I could price them. They would be served on their own as a main and of course an evening item.

thanks
post #2 of 10
At my previous job we served 24 for a half portion and 48 for a full.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 10
So, besides the "count", what would you estimate the "weight" to be, as that is the way they are sold in our area?
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #4 of 10
Mussels are sold by the pound. You're probably paying around $2/lb...assuming fresh PEI mussels are what you serve.
Over the course of a year, the mussels get bigger and smaller, so you're better off doing your dish by weight, rather than by count.

One Pound is generally a good portion size to start with. That math is simple, then you just need to cost out the other ingredients...butter, wine, garlic etc.

For most restaurants, the RTN on mussels is one of the best performers on the menu.
The perceived value for the guest is really good too! Even though it's a pound of mussels in front of them, the reality is that only about 35% is meat, the rest is shell.

Great food cost and RTN for you, but it won't fill the guests up....plenty room left for other things.
post #5 of 10
24=roughly 1#
The mussels were my boss' "thing". Had to have them whether we made money on them or not. Basically as far as food cost goes, he didn't really have a clue. I attempted to educate him and bring food cost under control, but the ultimate decisions were his.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #6 of 10
It's obviously a regional thing but here I'm getting about 50% protein and a dish with 24 mussels would leave the diner very sated.
post #7 of 10
35-40% avg meat/shell ratio over the course of a year.
Dec-April produce the highest....let me know what you get in July/Aug. It will be much lower and your count per lb will be much higher
post #8 of 10
Also, I was referring only to PEI/Nova Scotia/Maine (blue/black).

The west coast and NZ Greenshells are completely different. I'd be happy to share why if you want to know
post #9 of 10
Inquiring minds want to KNOW!
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #10 of 10
LOL!
Okay

Greenshells have beards too. This is how they seed/spawn.

When you debeard a blue mussel, it continues to live. Debearding a greenshell kills it almost instantly.

Most greenshells are sold frozen because of this. Freezing allows them to only harvest when the mussels are at their best. That's why they're bigger too.

They are farmed and sold fresh...but the beards are messy and expensive
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