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Prime Rib

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
The best way to prepare a 30 lb Prime Rib roast - it is frozen at this point
I need it for an upcoming open house party
some told me to roast to rare and then slice it as people arrive dip it into hot aujus to cook it further - is this right ?
Debi S.
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Debi S.
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post #2 of 26
How do you want to serve it? Is it a buffet? Plated dinner?
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 26
Aus jus is not for further cooking, it's for dipping. There have been many great discussions on prime rib on this site, you'll find loads of information if you do a search through the forums. Also here are some websites that you might find helpful. My only 2 cents is make sure you defrost it in the fridge from the previous day at least and on the day of cooking let it sit out until it comes up to room temperature before you cook it.

Perfect Prime Rib, Roasted Prime Rib, Standing Rib Roast, Prime Rib Roasting Chart, Prime Rib Dinner, Yorkshire Pudding

How to Cook A Prime Rib Roast | Cooking A Delicious Prime Rib Recipe

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
plated but as they arrive for the meal
Debi S.
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Debi S.
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post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
thank you for your input
Debi S.
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Debi S.
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post #6 of 26
plated... but as they arrive for the meal?

so people will be coming at random times during the day and then whenever they want to order you plate it up? or are people all coming at the same time and then they all eat at the same time?

a bit confused as to how you explained that..
post #7 of 26
I don't think the integrity of the meat will hold up after being dipped/cooked in the jus, especially not for a plated dinner and not for a slab of meat like that... thin slices for a sandwich, sure, but not for what I imagine you're going to be doing.

I would suggest that you time your meat cooking such that it is finished about 30 minutes before the start of the meal, that'll give it enough time to rest and if there are any delays in the timing of the meal you can always keep it warm in a jury rigged hot box such as the oven with a bit of steaming water.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #8 of 26
>>frozen
I have no experience with 30 pounds, but even lighter roast take a long time to thaw in the refrigerator - do no underestimate the thaw time - I'd been thinking 5-6 days!

>>cooking: there's two major and fifty thousand minor variations.
majors:
hot/fast roasting
long/slow roasting
it's an oven temperature thing. pick your poison - I only do low& slow

regardless, you need a thermometer - for 30 lbs, maybe a couple.

cook it to where you want it ie rare / medium / (anybody do well done prime rib?)
keeping in mind the outer bits / ends get to medium while the inner is still rare.
chopping into multiple chunks vs. one single 30 lb monster will help if you anticipate a lot of medium folks (because each chunk has two ends....)

do not count on reheating/further cooking in au jus, microwave, gravy, pan sauce, or nuclear reactors. produces shoe leather from a fine cut of meat.

should we talk about dry aging? that's a 5- 10 day deal, post thaw....
post #9 of 26
There's no such thing as a 30# prime rib. What cut of meat do you actually have? The full rib primal is 8 bones. A packer cut (completely untrimmed), standing rib, might reach 25# from a large animal. The full "prime rib" is a standing rib roast including either the first 7 or middle 6 ribs. A "standing rib" means the rib bones are left in, so the roast can "stand" on them while cooking. The 7 or 6 rib difference is mostly regional.

You shouldn't be using a packer cut. You don't have the butchering skills or the equipment. The roast you purchase should be cap on, fat trimmed back to around 1/4", chine bone off or mostly off and cracked. Rule of thumb for prime rib -- just under 2 lbs of meat on the plate for each rib.

The suggestion to "dip it into hot aujus to cook it farther," is incoherent. Presumably the suggestion to dip into hot liquid is to heat it if it's lost heat. Bad idea. Allow the guests to use au jus as they see fit. There's nothing wrong with warm prime rib.

You may cook a prime rib to temp, and hold it for several hours in a cooler. I believe we've talked about using the cooler for meat. If not -- wrap the meat in foil heavily, put it in an insulated cooler, fill the remaining space with towels or crumpled newspaper, and get the lid on tight. Put a weight on it, if you have must. Rib will keep up to four hours at serving temperature this way. In addition, the prolonged rest will make it taste better.

If you're serving rib, you really should have a carving station. Rib does not hold well in a chaffer once sliced. If it's warmer than room temperature it will dry out quickly. I understand you have to do what you have to do, and that it's your employer's decision... It's just to give you an idea of what's going to happen if you do pre-slice. Holding it in an au jus won't improve matters any. Your rib will turn to pot-roast, which isn't an equally undesirable outcome.

BDL
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post #10 of 26
BEG TO DIFFER ,
A prime rin from a wholesaler delivered as is, weighs 40 pounds or more. My spec is 40 lbs tops as over that it is to bone heavy, no more then 1 inch fat on outside at least 7 1/2 inches across the eye, No more then 12 inches tip pf rib bone to curve of fat flap near eye /Then you proceed to break it down to either Export Spec. Oven prepared or oven ready spec. all 3 are different ways of cutting. And all 3 are priced accordingly by wholesaler packer.
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post #11 of 26
Beg to differ with your beg to differ. That's not a prime rib or even a prime rin, that's a full rib primal which is something else. The everlovin' IMPS 103.

Plus, as a practical matter she needs a lot of trimming. She's totally unequipped to deal with the chine -- rather removing it or cracking it. The feather bones are as much of a challenge as she can handle and she'd be better off without them.

The fat cap isn't going to do her any good either. While you, Old, foodpump, I and a few others might take the cap in one piece, cut out the false lean and fat channel, season the lip, and truss the fat back on -- she isn't going to because she doesn't know how. She should get a 6 rib "prime rib," with the fat cap, false lean, fat channel, chine and feather bones all removed. In other words, ready to season and carve. I forget the IMPS number, something like 109D or 109E.

By the time her roast is all trimmed out and oven ready (none of which she should be doing herself) the weight is going to be something like 15 - 18 pounds. Don't blame me, it's the truth.

FWIW, I don't consider not knowing a bunch of fancy butcher stuff any more of a handicap than knowing how to do fancy sugar work. Nobody knows everything. We all have our strengths. Mine just happens to be cocktails.

Not shtirred,
BDL
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post #12 of 26
I was thinking the 109's as well.
Of course, it's possible the loin is off a diary cow...they get pretty big and sell for dirt cheap.

The biggest lipon I've personally cooked was about 17lbs, cap on 1/4 trim.
post #13 of 26
The au jus thing is a method commonly used in restaurants to cook the cut to a more desired doneness. You roast the prime rare or med. rare, and if someone wants it med well or well, you drop it into a pot of simmering au jus to cook it to the desired doneness. I've done it many times.
post #14 of 26
109 here are called export/
I sometimes forget that in a lot of cases I am not answering restaurant people, and they probably dont know what I am talking about.
The same as when I roam the supermarket and see London Broil(from the Chuck)? or a mom and pop steak, I dont kmow what they are talking about.:bounce:
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post #15 of 26
I'm so proud nobody has suggested the lettuce/microwave method. :) Times sure have changed.
post #16 of 26
Chef Debi's pretty sophisticated, but she probably doesn't know her way around meat the way we do. Not many people do unless they have the specific background.

When I told her there was no such thing as a 30# prime rib roast, I wasn't only conveying IMPS Meat Cut Identification information, but the idea there was something wrong with the plan as it stood. Something major. Also, I don't want any "civillians" following the thread to think they can go to the butcher and get a piece of prime rib that's going to feed 60.

People, chef's even, who buy meat from a butcher expect something different from those who buy wholesale from a packer. And they should. You don't need to know a lot of butchering skills to be a good cook. Some, yes. A lot, no. Can I crack a bone with a cleaver and mallet? Yes. Do I get the butcher to do it with a saw instead? Of course. (I'm not nearly as dumb as I look.)

If it gets down to it, one of us could explain to Debi how to crack and trim a full rib to take it down to buffet service. But that's certainly not the best thing for either her or her employer -- who I'm sure has no idea that a 30# primal is still only about 20 portions. (Sit down dinner portions, you can get a heck of a lot more at a plate-in-your-lap buffet). Just a big waste of time and money all around.

BDL
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post #17 of 26
I firmly believe the only way to serve prime rib or roast beef at a buffet is carved to order keeping it warm under a heat lamp. To cover it or dip it in Au Jus is a sacralige, and not befitting the quality of the cut of meat. For that matter I think any meat or turkey should be carved to order at least at a quality function.
Only cut of meat I know will feed 50 to 80 is a Steamship Round, but if not carved correctly is like eating a sneaker, No correction, sneaker is more tender.:lol:
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post #18 of 26
I about killed a cook for doing that. I had the biggest pet peeve about microwaves used for cooking....especially meats! :rolleyes: But that's a different topic:D Bringing up in a steaming pot of au jus was just as sickening to me.

Ed, When we used the salamander, the leaf lettuce cover was to keep the meat texture and roasting integrity intact. It really kept the meat from browning or the fat from crisping when the guest wanted the meat destroyed.:look: I just couldn't bring myself to let the whole thing go to he!! in a hand basket because they wanted it well done.:crazy:

I liked the Leaf lettuce/salamander method but then again....anyone wanting a piece of Prime Rib anything more than Med was eating at their own risk. Had a disclaimer on the menu that said "We are not responsible for anything ordered over the temperature of Medium"
And yes it was a half joke.;)
post #19 of 26
A lot of times you have to work with what you've got. We didn't have a meat lamp with a cutting board or or a roast and hold unit we could use to keep a prime at a certain temp for a whole service. These were casual places that would run prime for New Years eve or Vanlentine's day, not a buffet type thing where you would stand and carve it. We would also have to really watch our waste margins as prime rib is the biggest money waster there is in my opinion. We couldn't afford to hack a piece up into smaller pieces in order to get the cut at the right temp. We would have had to put it back in the oven and all the pieces would have gotten over done. Using the au jus was really the best option, and seemed to work well as people always loved the prime when we did it. Sometimes it's really hard to convince owners not to try to do things the kitchen isn't equipped for. When they insist on it, you do what you can how you can. I actully thought I was the only one who did that until I worked in another place where they did the same thing. I once worked at a catering/vending place that had "fry 160 eggs for vending" on my production sheet. They didn't have a flat grill, so I asked one of the kids how I was supposed to do that. They said to put a roaster lid on the burners and fry the eggs in the lid. What the heck, it worked.
post #20 of 26
FOOD FIGHT! FOOD FIGHT!!!

Lot of excietment here for a change! :bounce:

Keep it going, Ed and BDL

Mike :crazy:
travelling gourmand
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post #21 of 26
Greyeaglem !
Try frying eggs on a double sheet pan on top of 4 burners, but use pam and clarafied butter it works well! Gotta do what you gotta do. " Dinner Impossible"
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post #22 of 26
Sternos for burners? ;)
post #23 of 26

I have to agree with you........ I'm sitting here looking at one 32 lbs........... bone in, cap off

post #24 of 26


 

WRONG........... please read ed's post below yours

 

haliday
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

There's no such thing as a 30# prime rib.



 

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by haliday View Post


 

WRONG........... please read ed's post below yours

 

haliday

 

They differ on what cut they are calling a prime rib.  That is the disagreement.  BDL claims a true prime rib consists of a seven bone section while Ed believes a full prime is 13 ribs.

post #26 of 26

Haliday,

 

Wondering what brings this up now?  Someone making prime rib for Christmas?

 

Anyway... Know your bovine myology.  The standing rib primal and prime rib subprimal are two different cuts. This doesn't so much fall under the category of "differing terminology," but under the "duh" category of "why do you think they call it "Prime?"  The problem here is that the term "prime rib" has become diluted by people who don't use it for its specific meaning but to refer to any portion of the standing rib, or to the whole thing. 

 

Kuan he da kine.

 

BDL

 

 


Edited by boar_d_laze - 12/17/11 at 8:49am
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