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gas vs electric is there a film when gas used? as mother in law states.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hello all, I will be in process of small kitches reno. Am trying to decide gas vs electric. Had read recent responses to someone elses queeries. It seemed that most people prefer using gas stove top. What about the oven? gas vs electric. Also my mother in law states she would never have gas due to the "film" it leaves all over the kitchen. Could anyone comment to this concern please?

Sincerely, confused.
post #2 of 10
The "film" that gets all over everything in my kitchen is the grease that evaporates into the air from cooking. :(

I'm not sure what she's referring to. Natural gas burns very clean, in my experience. I'm not so sure about propane, though. Could she mean propane?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 10
Propane burns clean too- that's why plumbers use it to solder pipes together- leaves no "film" on the clean copper that could cause a leak.

I suspect MIL dealt with a dirty kitchen in her past whose owner used the excuse "it's the gas stove". OK, right... I've NEVER disagreed with my MIL. :blush:
post #4 of 10
Propane burns just as cleanly as natural gas, Suzanne. Been using it 20 years now and cannot discern any significant difference from when I had natural gas---other than the lack of that disgusting smell they add to natural gas as a "safety" warning.

Dpetit: Gas does not, repeat, does not leave any sort of film. The only by-product of its burning is water vapor, which you shouldn't be aware of anyway. Any film your MIL noticed came as a result of cooking; usually fats and oils which vaporized and then settled on hard surfaces. This is an especial problem in kitchens that lack vent fans. But it is not a result of the heat source.

Gas is the first choice of most serious cooks because of the thermal control it provides. If you need to increase or decrease the heat, you merely turn the knob, and there you are.

My advice: Don't argue with your MIL. But go with the gas.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 10
I think the right thing to do is agree with your MIL but make the right choice for you (gas).

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 10
My MIL used to say about her MIL "I yessed her to death, then did as I **** pleased anyway". I got along very well with HubbyDearest's mom, even though we didn't actually agree on a lot of issues. Some things just weren't worth arguing over, and we both knew it. However, she was in the camp that believed "gas stoves are dirty", and claimed that all her white walls and white woodwork had yellowed over time as a result of pollution from her gas cooktop. Never mind that both she and her husband, as well as various constant visitors, smoked like chimneys...it was most definately the gas stove that caused the problems!
I hold the opinion that gas is clean and efficient. If there is any sort of residue, it is the result of tiny molecules of fats, etc, carried by steam. An habitual cleaning discipline is the only cure.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #7 of 10
The only thing I can think of is the stuff they put in natural gas so that it smells. The smell is twofold: So you can sniff gas leaks before they explode, and it smells so bad, its hard to snuff yourself on it.

I've always wondered if it being there somehow might ever so slightly affect the taste of food that comes into direct contact with a natural gas flame.

doc
post #8 of 10
My guess is it's the carbon build up she is talking about. We've all seen it in our Professional kitchens when the air fuel mixture is not adjusted properly. Usually happens when someone takes the thing apart to clean it. Although the mix is preset from the factory with residential equipment, there is still room for adjustment. The other thing is it could be jetted wrong.

Cooking with gas is clean although in either case (natural or propane) a direct vent to the outside must be provided. Clean doesn't mean it doesn't emit carbon monoxide. Most city and state building codes require this when using gas.

With that said, I prefer gas for the cook top as most do. The oven choice for me is electric. Again this is professional preference so take it or leave it. The heat is different and makes for better baked products.

There are plenty of Dual Fuel options available these days if you are not using a cook top and built in oven. Like everything else out there you get what you pay for so cheap-o is really that. Most high end items like Monogram are the Profile with a different design. You just pay for the name. Unless you're going with Wolf, Gaggenau, Viking, etc......something middle of the road like the profile, Kenmore or Kitchen aid will do just fin for normal home use. JMHP(and highly medicated today)O :D
post #9 of 10
For a cooktop, if you have the choice and are a serious cook, is gas. For the oven, go with the electric.
post #10 of 10
I prefer electric ovens too as the themostat allows better temp control. Gas does add humidity to the over when it burns, which is why the burners rust. This residual humidity can affect certain things you are baking. Gas also is not as effecient energy wise as electricity. Gas gained popularity for years because it was less expensive to operate. That is no longer the case. I have always preferred electric deep fryers because they performed better than gas. People argued this point with me for years and told me I was an idiot for thinking this. Well, I win. McDonalds switched to all electric fryers a few years ago because they were more efficient.
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