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Anyone here make tongue?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Anyone here make tongue?

I picked up about a 3 pounder.

No idea how to cook it. My dad said as a kid he use to love tonge, until he found out what it was, never had it after that.

Do you boil this?

Dice it up?

Do you cook it all the way through? Medium?

TIA
post #2 of 22
A long simmer is the general routine, usually with some spices. Then the tongue is peeled of it's skin. Generally then sliced and served.

There are alternate routines such as tongue tacos, a personal favorite, but even those I usually start with a long simmer.

They are also smoked but I think even those get simmered and peeled first. I've never smoked tongue.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 22
It's one of my favorite meats. I cook it as phatch says, using Penzey's corned beef spices.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Long as in like 1 hr or 2 hrs?
post #5 of 22
Without getting into serious cooking, prep as in larding for Flamande, but just keeping it straight ahead...

For a 3 lb already "pickled tongue:

Simmer 2 hours. Remove from the water, peel and remove the roots. Brown some vegetables in butter in a heavy casserole, pour about a quart of liquid in (could be beer, wine or broth), and add the warm tongue to the casserole. Cover, and into a 300F oven for a two hour braise.

Your choice of vegetable will do a lot to determine the character of the tongue. For instance, you could choose a regular mirepoix or the trinity for a European or Creole style respectively.

Classic technique includes rolling the tongue in cheesecloth, and trussing -- after simmeting and trimming -- so it holds a shape during the braise. I find this helps the tongue to slice better later on, but it's not absolutely necessary.

If you do go Euro, try this: Include a good sized turnip (medium diced) in the mirepoix. After sauteeing the vegetables, add a little tomato paste and brown it slightly to make a pincage. Use about 1/2 beef or brown stock, 1/2 beer or wine for the braizing liquid. Also use a bouquet garni and a couple of bay leaves. After the braise, set the tongue aside on a hot, covered platter. Then strain the cooking liquid through a medium sieve, pressing through as much of the mirepoix as you can. That should be the carrots and the turnips, leaving behind the celery fibre and onion. Return the sauce to the heat and reduce it to about two cups. Thicken the sauce slightly with either a flour or corn starch slurry. If you like, you may add your choice of carrots, pearl onions, pieces of parsnip, bell pepper, etc., which you've already blanched or sauteed to crisp-tender.

In the north of France, the Low Countries, and Germany they like to serve tongue on a bed of cooked greens, spinach for instance.

Of course, if you're using different braising vegetables and liquids, you're free to create your own sauce according to whichever classic or improvised techniques you like. Sweet and sour compliments tongue nicely.

In any case, slice the tongue against the grain and only against the grain. An ideal tongue slice is a very tender 3/8" thick.

When the tonuge has cooled it may be sliced very thin and reheated or served room temperature for sandwiches. Tongue and very hot mustard do well together.

BDL
post #6 of 22
I haven't had tongue in a long time. We treat it like corned beef in my family. It comes out great in the pressure cooker. Put into cooking rack in the pressure cooker, add a bottle of Guiness stout, or a can of beef broth or stock, salt, pepper, garlic and a sliced onion & lock on the lid. Bring to full pressure and time for 35 minutes. Allow pressure to drop naturally. Slice for sandwiches. mmm.

Reminds me though, of the All in the Family episode when Archie asked Edith what she was making for dinner.

"Tongue, Archie"

Archie replies "I aint eatin nothing that came out of an animal's mouth! Cook me 2 eggs."
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
LOL
:beer:
post #8 of 22
I do have my preference in tongue. It's not all the same. My favorite is an uncooked one that is attached to a human female, to be licked, maybe nibbled but not chomped. No seasoning is needed.
post #9 of 22
Pork and lamb tongue is also good. Cooks faster as it's smaller.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 22
My friend phatch pointed out that the cooking time I had mentioned seemed too short for tongue. He is correct. I have changed the tongue recipe to reflect the appropriate time for a 3 to 4 pound beef tongue. Thanks phatch.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #11 of 22
u can braise/simmer to have cold or hot

good sandwhich

u can make a sweet mustard sauce or a dijon or a hot horseradish mustard sauce

there are casseroles

salads

lots of stuff to do

pies

pasties

its very tender wonderful meat that can absorb flavors

its pretty lean too.

if u have a thing for cows, this is like legal bestiality.
post #12 of 22
I just received a tongue today from a friend who had bought half a cow. He didn't want it so I said I would take it. My plan for it is to simmer it for a few hours, peel it, dice it up, and quickly pickle it. I then serve it tossed with a mixture of peppers, onions, celery, etc. and serve it with greens. Makes a great first course salad. It's kind of my own take on a German salad made with beef tongue.
post #13 of 22
YOU should follow the directions on the label.:lol:

In Kosher catering, we used to serve it with a raisin apricot heavy sauce, the caterer , although wrong called it tongue Polonaise.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #14 of 22
that should be very good
post #15 of 22

1 quesion; 1 comment

1. what does it taste like? chicken?? haha, but seriously...what does it taste like?

2. the Archie Bunker reference....HYSTERICAL! Now i have the theme song in my head...GAWD Edith is a good singer!
post #16 of 22
it reminds me of thick cut coldcuts

its pretty good meat!!!... texture kind of like ham



really good
post #17 of 22
Have you done it that way before? I've had it pickled before cooking but never vice versa. I'd be afraid that if I cooked it tender enough to eat the pickling process would make it mushy... ???

I've had German tongue salads similar to that which you're describing and they were excellent.

BDL
post #18 of 22
It's beef. No surprise in the flavor really. Though it's more like roast than steak meaning beefier. It's a terribly well exercised muscle meaning it's quite tough. Until you cook it a long time. Then it takes on a pleasant tenderness.

Visually, it can be off putting in its whole state. It looks like what it is, a giant tongue complete with coarse taste buds. Peeling it gets rid of some of the visual impact, but it needs more camouflage. Which explains why its sliced and cubed and I don't think ever served whole.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #19 of 22

funny tongue story

I shared a flat with a girl years and years ago (1970) and came home one day to a pot cooking on the stove, steam all over the place. I got close and noticed the cover was on askew. I got even closer and found that there was a tongue inside, but it didn;t fit in the pot, and it was sticking out, sort of curled downwards, like a hot dog's tongue, the cover like the upper lip. Hilarious.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #20 of 22
To cook a tongue do the following:

1 beef tongue
Water
1 tbsp. salt
1 sm. bay leaf
1 onion slice
1 stalk celery
1 sprig parsley



Place tongue in kettle and cover with cold water. Add salt, bay leaf, onion, celery and parsley. Cover, heat to boiling, reduce heat and simmer until tender, allowing about 1 hour per pound.
Remove from stock to cool. Save and strain stock for Beef Tongue Piquante and gravies or soups. Remove roots and skin from tongue. When cold, cut in thin diagonal slices. Makes about 4 servings per pound.
post #21 of 22
No offense but this is copied and pasted from an internet recipe resource. I'm not a moderator and perhaps it's not my place to say so, but at the risk of presumption ...

In the future, if you're going to copy and paste, at least provide attribution. It would also be helpful if you'd included the rest of the recipe for "Tongue Piquante."

Thanks,
BDL
post #22 of 22
Hey BDL try doing it like a virginia ham, or just make a paste of brown sugar and mustard with just a touch of honey, put in a slow oven after you boil cooked it , Its really good. We did corned beef same way and carved on the buffet at all the Bar &bas Mitzvahs in New York. If you did not have it, you were not Bar Mitzvahd. ED:D

PS //your right the above procedure was copied from a site.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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