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Looking for a Brisket recipe for Passover

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I am hosting Passover Sedar this comming weekend and have some rather boring brisket recipes on hand. I would love to serve a brisket that is unique and great tasting. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
post #2 of 8
How far out of the traditional box are you willing to travel? Like in the direction of barbecue?
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

BBQ is great

Barbeque is wonderful- especially considering I have just built my own smoker! I am not sure how my traditionalist guests would respond, but I can always make a barbeque brisket any ol' weekend.
post #4 of 8
Have yu looked at the Joy of Cooking recipe for Sweet and Sour Brisket? They show an alternate using the same basic recipe, but omitting the chili sauce and adding dried apricots and dried plums. It looks very interesting and tasty. :lips:
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #5 of 8
I've barbecued brisket for a few of my family's Pesach dinners, and they've been well-recieved to the point that those family who attend but are not part of the planning can be somewhat annoying when smoked brisket isn't on the menu. Sometimes, it isn't practical.

Be assured that your family will like smoked brisket, if done right. But also be assured that timing a couple of large briskets to have ready and holding before the seder starts requires getting up pretty early in the morning. For instance, I'd trim, rub and inject my briskets the evening before, prep the smoker, go to bed, get up at 3AM, start the fire and get the briskets in the smoker. That's so early the neighborhood chickens were calling the cops.

My smoker uses an "Afterburner H," propane fire which only takes about twenty minutes to stabilize at the right temperature. Had it been a charcoal fire it would have taken another 20 minutes just to get going; and all-wood, still longer. Even after the fire's going, a brisket pit needs regular tending. The day warms up and the fire needs to be banked. Fuel and/or chunk need reloading, and so on.

The Afterburner allows fairly fine temperature control. 1 hour a pound looks a lot 245Funtil the stall, then a bump to 275F until done, is very close to a reliable 1 hour per pound. My experience is that at anything less than 270F, stall time isn't really predictable. The lower the temp, the less the degree of certainty. Not every pit allows the certainty an Afterburner fired cooker does. Something else you'd have to factor in.

A 3AM start allowed me to be sure it would be ready to go with enough time for me to get it to my folk's house for slicing there. You might think that 45 minute drive is time you can subtract so you can sleep in until 4 (lazy bones!). But no. Brisket needs the rest even more than you do.

However, on the plus-organizational side, an outdoor cook frees up a lot of oven space. Golden!

If you've got someone sufficiently stupid ... no wait, not stupid, willing. I meant willing. If you've got someone willing to handle the early morning aspects, you can't beat smoked brisket for the pure wow factor of the meat. The particular brisket mein yiddeshe mishpucheh associates with seder combines marinating, rubbing, an injection with a subtle hint of truffle, a controlled amount of oak smoke, and a "barbecue-bordelaise" sauce, in a style we might as well call "haute-b-que." If you like brisket at all, you're going to like that one alot.

Unfortunately, my written recipe was lost after a virus induced reformat. If you're serious about cooking a similar, simplified brisket recipe for Passover, we can start a new thread on smoked briskets. The task of rewriting the recipe described above, in all its tiresome and unnecessary complication, as well as its sharing, will be reserved for another time and purpose.

BDL
post #6 of 8
Cook your basic, boring brisket but throw in a good handful of dried cherries and a scant handful of diced dried pineapple. Or grilled fresh pineapple. Depending on the sweetness of the cherries and the tartness of the pineapple you may need to add a bit of brown sugar or a splash of maple syrup, though I go for the tart side. Pork can take a lot of pineapple, which is *obviously* not an issue here, but beef is a bit more tricky of a match, so don't overdo it.

mjb.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 8
Great thread! My mom never cooked brisket, as our western Illinois town didn't stock such items once the only kosher butcher got out of Dodge (or, Rock Island). Consequently, we were a poultry-based Passover family.

Since then, I've married into a brisket-loving family. However, several of the members have food allergies or dislikes. Most of these include things that make meat tastier: garlic, pepper salt, tomatoes... try making tasty brisket without those ingredients! I ended up smothering the beast in onions, mushrooms and fresh herbs, with a bit of beef broth and a shot of red wine (Shhhh!). It went over great, although I had to strain the broth to remove any sign of fresh herbs. :D Reducing the broth, then thickening it with some potato starch produced a decent gravy.

My BIL made the brisket this year by marinating it for 24 hours in bbq sauce and some fruit nectar, then slow-baking it for 17 hours. It was a bit dry and too sweet for my taste, but there wasn't much left.
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post #8 of 8
Too dry and too sweet you say? Was he, by any chance, Jewish?

BDL
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