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TV Chefs We Have Learned From

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
This was mentioned in another thread and instead of hijacking it I started a new one. Which of the TV chefs have influenced the way you cook? I watched Justin Wilson a lot along with the Frugal Gourmet. I still use some of the recipes I saw on those shows :lol: Justin Wilson's garlic and scallion stuffed chuck roast is a favorite of mine still.
post #2 of 21
I suspect that most of the British based chefs will be strangers to those from the USA/Canada/Australia/NZ!

Over the years:

Delia Smith
Galloping Gourmet (in his earlier, UK incarnation before he found God or whatever!)
Rick Stein - for fish
Jean Cristoph Novelli for puddings
Jamie Oliver
Gordon Ramsay
Raymond Blanc
Anton Mosimann
Antonio Carluccio
Nick Nairn

Edited to add MP White.. how could I have forgotten him?!
post #3 of 21
I would say Robert Irvine.
The guy gets it done no matter what. He is always thinking ,and if an emergency comes up he can handle it. The most important thing, he knows how to improvise and keep guest happy. Regardless of the fact that he did or did not work for the queen nonsense. I like him and glad he is comeing back to US tv with dinner impossible as the guy who replaced him could not handle it ,nor do I think could do it on his own.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 21
In a sense I go back to the beginning, as I was watching Julia when she first started in
Boston. And, yes, I learned a lot from her. In fact, I learned from all the earlier ones---Joyce Chen, and Justin "onyyon" Wilson, and Graham "short slurp" Kerr and a mort of others.

Never watched Jeff Smith, much to my regret.

I continue to learn from every TV cook I watch. Even Rachael Ray. My attitude is if one of them shows me a trick or technique that I didn't know, which I can use in my own kitchen, then the show was worthwhile.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 21
Julia, always learned so much from her.....last fall I checked out dvd's of her old shows.....STILL years later I'm amazed at how relavent they are and how much I still learn from watching her.

Jeff Smith, (creep that he is) had some wonderful food history with his shows

Graham Kerr.....vaguely remember watching him.

Justin was a hoot, he used to visit Baton Rouge when we were living there in the 1980's.

I'm jamming on Made in Spain series now, Jose Andres is a delight.....many of his Spainish techniques are new to me, the field trips to Spain's different regions with inside views of artisan bakeries, cheese makers, kitchens, fishing expositions are food porn at it's best. You just cannot fake his infectious joy of cooking.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 21
Jeff Smith (The Frugal Gourmet)

Martn Yan

Steve Raichlen

Lidia Bastianich

I watched Justin Wilson as he was entertaining but I don't think he made any particular impact in my cooking.

Certainly there are others, perhaps greater cooks who I've watched more recently, but they've not been as influential. Mostly because i've already learned lots of what they're doing.

Rick Bayless

Jose Andres (Made in Spain, not his food chemistry tricks)

Cee Dub has plenty more I could learn from but his shows are not on as much as I would like. (ceedub.com) This is camp cooking, not fine dining.

You'll notice a striking absence of commercial TV shows there. It's all PBS, not Food TV or Rachel Ray.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 21
For me it was Jacques Pepin and Julia Child.
post #8 of 21
>I watched Justin Wilson as he was entertaining but I don't think he made any particular impact in my cooking. <

I agree that he didn't directly impact what I cook. But I learned too very good lessons from him: 1. It's ok to play with your food, and have fun with it. 2. There's nothing wrong with being passionate about cooking.

In that respect, he probably had more of an impact on me than any of the others.

I'll go to my grave smiling over one episode in which he said, "hot sauce to taste," as he poured glug after glug of it into the pot. He then gave us that sly look, and, without even sampling it, he said, "don't taste good yet," as he poured on the hot stuff.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 21
He routinely did that with the wine and Worcestershire sauce too.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 21
Martin Yan

Jacques Pepin

Alton Brown

Mario Batali
post #11 of 21
Justin was a character unto himself.....he and Paul Prudhomme epitomized southern Lousisana hospitality, you just knew that man was having a goooood time.

John Folse is another one, tall white hat and numerous restaurants but that man had an easy way about him.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #12 of 21
Julia definitely, and Alton Brown. I think Julia got me interested in trying ingredients and recipes my mom never used. Over the years there have been many TV chefs that probably inspired me to some degree, but these two are standouts for me. :chef:
post #13 of 21
Julia and Jacques for sure. But also Todd English. Before he started hawking lousy cookware on the shopping channels, he had a PBS show that aired right after J & J here in New England. His shows were usually both thoughtful and entertaining. I think Martin Yan came on after Todd.
post #14 of 21

Many of them....

Main ones:
Martin Yan
Margaret and Franco Romagnoli
Jacque Pepin
Lidia Bastianich
and Alton Brown for the effect I see him having on my 7 year old grandson and his younger brother and sister, they watch him because he entertains them, they don't understand all the science he explains but he manages to make them very curious about cooking and they will happily come in the kitchen to help and learn, they have also become very adventurous eaters, very different from most kids who usually want to live on fast food..........these kids want to try more ethnic or exotic foods, and they love feeling like they had a hand in making dinner. I am having a great time with them, so different than my own kids.........they got bored easily when I tried to get them to watch cooking shows with me when they were young and they sure didn't want to help make a meal, it was booooorrrrring to them.........guess I should send Alton a thank you card.:D
post #15 of 21
Alton Brown and Gordon Ramsay

There have been countless more, but these two have influenced me more than any. Alton for me to really learn simply how elaborate recipes can be done, and Gordon, for his philosophy of clean, unpretentious food. Nothing on the plate unless it's meant to be eaten.
post #16 of 21
My count-down from 12 (two groups, each in alphabetical order):

12. Mario Batali -- Truly wonderful cook. Somehow managed to retain a sense of self and sanity during the whole celebrity run up. Good, but not a great teacher. Added to the list as I rewrite, because Linda learned to love him as an Iron Chef. He was/is (whatever the state of the relationship is between Food and him) a great Iron Chef.

11. Julia Child -- Great cook, great teacher, great showman. "Save the liver."

10. Pierre Franey -- The man could do anything with food. He knew more tips, tricks and secrets than anyone before or since. If you watched Franey, reading Craig Claiborne made sense. In a way. Very step by step, and superb at the simple. I do a lot of things the Franey way -- mashed potatoes for instance.

9. Madeline Kamman -- Outstanding attitude. Wonderful cook. Just wonderful. Would have probably been very hot had we been age appropriate. You like cuisine bourgeois? As is said in France, "She da man."

8. Graham Kerr -- Taught me to never panic in the kitchen. If only I could extend the lesson.

7. Emeril Lagasse -- I'm adding him as I rewrite, partly because Linda says he belongs on the list. Very good teacher. Great cook. Really great cook if you consider that his technique isn't all that good. There's a lesson there. "It ain't rocket science, y'know."

6. Jacque Pepin -- Well, sort of. By the time I saw his show, I was already cooking pretty much the same way -- but of course not nearly as well. Great senses of perspective and humor. Fun to see Sophie grow up.

5. Jeff Smith -- Kept it simple, very inclusive regarding American food, more than a little James Beard to his outlook. Shame about the old perv thing.

4. Justin Wilson -- Besides the whole cajun/creole thing, Justin heightened my interest in southern and country cooking generally.

Of course those nine can't compare to the three at the top, my heroes and yours:

3. Giada di Laurentis -- Once did a segment where she spread Nutella on bread. Doesn't get more educational than that. I mean, who knew?

2. Sandra Lee -- Table settings, girly drinks with lots of vodka.

1. Rachel Ray -- What can you say?

BDL
post #17 of 21
The first time an American experiences that is a bit of an eye opener though. I remember my first run in with Nutella in 1983. Had never imagined such a thing in a jar. And now you can buy it at Costco and everywhere else.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #18 of 21
So many, Ill never forget Graham Kerr, and many french Jean Soulard, Josée Di Stasio, all great people
post #19 of 21
The one, the inimitable Julia Child - taught me all the techniques i know.

Galloping gourmet, whose name i don;t know, but i recognized myself in his shortcuts (like how to slice an apple - put it whole and vertical on the board -cut slices from one side till you get to the core - turn so the flat side is down, slice away on one of the sides till you get to the core, turn again so that flat side is down, etc. ) and because i gallop, by nature.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #20 of 21
He's Graham Kerr - mentioned by both BDL and ME!
post #21 of 21
I'm a little surprised at the widespread mention of Justin Wilson. I watched him too, but thought him more of a clown than a real good cook.

I've mentioned this before - Ol' Justin was despised and reviled by the Cajun community. His reputation as a humorist was based on his repertoire of jokes about Cajun stupidity and, to add injury to insults, he was only half Cajun - one parent was, one wasn't.

A big part of his schtick was the cornpone accent and fractured syntax. He was in fact a college graduate with at least one graduate professional degree- in industrial engineering. He worked during WW II up north as an industrial safety engineer - hence the recurring jokes about wearing both belt and suspenders.

I loved Julia, the Frugal Fruitcake, Yan, and currently Michael Chiarello, Alton, Lidia, and the Overweight Contessa. I think Miss Thirty-Minute Meals suffers from terminal cuteness, and I can't stand Ol' Paula's molasses-mouthed southerness. And, I can't eat the well-lubed food she cooks.

A couple years ago, the Wall Street Journal's roving restaurant reviewer (How's that for a job!) Raymond Sokolov ate at her restaurant in Savannah and was a whole lot less than impressed. I think the executive chef may have hanged himself immediately after it was published. ;)

Finally, I want to assure you that I'm a HUGE fan of Giada's cleavage!!! :bounce: V :bounce:

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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