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Looking for an interesting canape suggestion for easter...

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Here's the deal. Mom and Dad are having easter this year, a big one, 20-25 people. They threw me a 50bill and said make that goat cheese and truffle honey crostini thing and that white bean salad crostini thing you make. (easy to please)

well, that will cost me about 10$. so I have a few bucks to put together another canape. Any ideas? Something that a lot of people will end up liking, but that isn't ordinary.

Has to be something I can pretty much make the night before as well.
post #2 of 18
Something not bread-based? Will they eat Belgian endive stuffed with some sort of seafood or meat salad? Or even cucumber slices topped with a protein like a rosette of smoked salmon? If you wrap them well, they'll hold overnight.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
definitely good suggestions. Ive done endive with blue cheese, pomegranite, and duck prosciutto before. that may go over ok. I'm sure there is going to be tons of food there. mainly heavy polish/ukranian/belorusian food, so anything different would be a good thing.
post #4 of 18
Confit or braise a rabbit (or just stick with the legs), use the meat to make a rillette, serve a quenelle on a potato chip with a cumberland sauce/gelee.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 18
Eggs are a pretty trite and traditional Easter component. You could do your basic deviled eggs with some unusual fillings, like red bell pepper, mascarpone and minced shrimp or scallops ( How's that seafood thing working out? ) or maybe a green olive tapenade with some finely minced hot cappicola or some such thrown in. But deviled eggs for two dozen people would invole a lot of time spent boiling and peeling. Hmmm.

Or maybe prepare some frittatas or quiches with various fillings ahead of time to rewarm before serving, cut into thin wedges or bite sized cubes.

Gee, I just had a sudden hankering for some steak tartare on garlic toast wedges. Maybe beef for dinner tomorrow.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6 of 18
Deviled Quail Eggs. Buy them already boiled in the can from the Asian grocer. Use 2-3 egg yolks from chickens though because it can be a pain trying to mash such a small amount.
post #7 of 18
You could make a savory cheesecake, serve with a variety of nice crackers. I have George Geery's recipe for Sundried Tomatoes & Pesto cheesecake. I'm planning to make it today in fact, for our own Easter dinner. If you're interested, I'll PM the recipe to you. I have several other savory cheesecake recipes that also sound good although I've never tried them.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #8 of 18
Something that always goes over with the crowds I serve it to:

Make gougeres in various shapes (use a piping bag). Then each shape---round, triangle, crescent, etc.---gets assigned it's own filling. Maybe a zesty ham salad in one, chicken & blue cheese salad in another, poached fish & tappenade in a third, etc.

Everything can be prepped the day before, and then final assembly is just a few minutes before service.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 18
I like taking pine nut basil pesto, and wrapping it in a length of lasagna cooked cooled pasta, and holding it together with a toothpick. They're good room temperature, bite size, you can pick them up with the toothpick, and they're tasty!

doc
post #10 of 18
baby artichoke halves with seafood salad

Cuke slice with smoked trout and dillweed aioli

Asparagus with a heavy lemon aioli.....unless it's a veg at dinner, serve cold so people can dip their spears n the creamy sauce

Snow peas.....


You've got cheese with honey/truffle, white bean goo.....assuming which is not a good thing usually, that your Easter is a spread with either lamb or ham or both with all the accompanying sides and desserts....
Something lighter with vegetation is a nice openning option.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Our easters are ham, no lamb, and a bunch of polish food. additional canapes will be some herring on polish rye with an onion slice, and devlied eggs.

I'm leaning more towards a braised rabbit shredded, on a crostini with some sort of jelly/jam...just to keep it consistent and just have a plate of misc. crostini's

or lamb. anyone have any lamb suggestions?
post #12 of 18
radishes with pumpernickle is a basic hodo for us

lamb....spice it up and sear, top with a cuke/greek yogurt sauce...fresh pitas are great if you have time to make them
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 18
Mini Aranchini(time consuming but sooo worth the effort)
Scottish Eggs
Satays
Shu Mai or any kind of steamed dumpling
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #14 of 18
Two lambs:

Luleh Kabab. I doubt they'd go for kibbe, but you would know.

Torched Tartare: Very rare (barely heated -- torched is best) mix of beef and lamb tartares (plenty of onion), with a smear of sweet/spicy "barbecue sauce." (Ketchup, vinegar, honey, mustard, worcestershire sauce, chipotle hot sauce, liquid smoke). The mix cuts some lambiness.

Other thoughts:

Caviar, California Style: Sourdough canapes, spread with avacado, and covered with very fresh salmon caviar (fresh salmon caviar is moist and loose, compared to packed). Wheat bread, spread with butter, and covered with tobiko wasabi (the green, wasabi flavored tiny eggs you get in Japanese restaurants), garnished with a slice of radish. Fresh domestic paddlefish caviar if you can find it, served anyway at all. You don't have to sell caviar to Eastern Europeans. They totally get it.

Garden Party Erskers: Got access to a grill? Grilled oysters, mignonette. Heat the grill very hot, with the hood closed. Single layer of fresh oysters. Close the grill. After about three minutes the oysters will open -- they're done. Take them off, cut off the tops, dress them with mignonette (and optional hot sauce).

Jeno's Mini Pizza Rolls; Cocktail Weiners in Sweet and Sour; Mini Bagel Dogs.

I heart herring. Cross 'em up with the good stuff. Get some matjes, garnish with sourcream and chopped scallion tops.

BDL
post #15 of 18
How about some homemade kielbasa type sausage using a mix of ground lamb and pork? Probably about two parts park, one part lamb. Hmmm, brain fade - I should remember that dish with these little sausages wrapped in a pita, something like cevipa - I usually refer to it as 'poops in a pita' Basically a Bosnian version of a gyro.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
braised some lamb shanks in red wine/stock, shredded, then strained and reduced down the braising liquid to a syrup and mixed it in....mixed in a little mint....was awesome....but no one ate it. such is life


ill post a seperate easter food post tomorrow, lots of pics.









post #17 of 18
beautiful.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #18 of 18
What about Trish's Nipples? (Called this because when cooked that's the way they look)

OLIVE CANAPES

Makes 20


75g plain flour
75g butter
50g grated cheddar
25g grated parmesan
20 olives (any sort preferably stuffed with pimento)

Mix ingredients.
Chill.
Roll out between two sheets of cling film.
Make into balls around an olive.
Chill again (can be frozen at this stage)

Cook in re-heated oven 220c mark 7 on baking tray for 15 mins. until golden brown.
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