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The difference in kitchens  

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Jim,
Thanks for joining us. I am looking forward to getting your book. For a variety of reasons I won't waste time with I have found myself further and futher away from the classical french roots of my love and training. It sounds like your book is the tonic I need to rediscover myself in that regard.

One of my favorite books of all time is Quentin Crewes "Great Chefs of France" if memory serves Georges Blanc was in there as well. I also have the Natural Cuisine of Georges Blanc. It always struck me (without actually being there) that the kitchens were immaculate and run with the highest degree of precision. Of course you expect that with the chefs, but what about the cooks. Do you find a difference between the cooks and their attitudes in those kitchens vs american kitchens?
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
post #2 of 5
In a French kitchen, everyone does what's expected of them without complaining. In a 3-star kind of kitchen, the kitchen runs in a state of complete calm even during the "rush". This style of running a kitchen is finally catching on in the U.S. with people such as Thomas Keller of The French Laundry.
post #3 of 5
>>> the kitchen runs in a state of complete calm even during the "rush".

now that's a refreshing opinion - and I'm darn glad to see it.

a while back I had the audacity to suggest Gordan Ramsay's TV rants were counterproductive to team function. based on comments to my misguided opinions I attempted to dine at Foxtrot Oscar on a recent London jaunt but it did not work out.
post #4 of 5
I worked at a michelin one star in France and the kitchen was immaculate. I mean it was really beautiful in the kitchen and during service it was quiet and calm. You actually would look a complete fool if you were jumping around slamming oven doors with your foot and twirling your tongs (no tongs you usually use a chef's fork).

I wish I had pictures of the walk in cooler I remember when I first saw it I could not believe it was real. So clean and organized it was amazing.

Lastly, not a microwave in site.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Thank you Jim, and Nicko. I always suspected as much. One of these days I do hope to get to one of those restaurants. (To eat, not to work!!!)
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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