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What to do with 9 egg yolks?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I just made some financiers and now I'm left with 9 egg yolks and no idea what to do with them. Any idea?
post #2 of 21
Creme Brulee or ice cream? Ice cream would be the best because it will keep.
post #3 of 21
I'd do creme brulee and invite some friends.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. Creme brulee is a good idea although I've never made it and don't have anything to "bruler" the creme.

I don't have an ice cream machine either... :(
post #5 of 21
You can broil the creme. How I did it the first few times.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 21
Big batch of Bernaise sauce. It freezes nice, just a bit tricky warming it up. Have some cold cream handy if it breaks and whip it in. Usually does the trick!
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post #7 of 21
Mayonaise, pastry cream, lemon curd, rich bread, bread pudding.......
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 21
Make egg noodles? Use extra yolks.

Did you hear about eggless egg noodles? Nope, it's not a yolk.
post #9 of 21
Freeze them in ice cube tray, one to a cube. When frozen, pop them into a zip lock bag, and use as needed. They should keep up to about 3 months.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #10 of 21
Kuan, funny you should mention egg noodles. My grandmother used to have the opposite problem. She would make egg noodles and always have leftover egg whites. She would always make Angelfood Cake with them.

Others have mentioned creme brulee. You can just used a standard torch you buy at any hardware store to caramelize the sugars on top. If you can't do that then there are a whole host of other custards you can bake such as flan, creme caramel, pots de cremes,etc.
post #11 of 21
A huge batch of Hollandaise... I swear that goes on everything.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #12 of 21
Lemon (or any very acid fruit) curd is fabulous and keeps extraordinarily well.
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
I have an old gas oven with no broiler. :look:

Those are all great ideas, wow - Thanks!! Lemon curd sounds very tempting. Hmmmmm...
post #14 of 21
My mind directly goes to english custard a.k.a. creme anglaise. Very easy to make. Also pick yourself up some already made pound cake, top with berries and a dollop of custard. Or drizzle all over pie.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #15 of 21
The first time I had creme Anglaise was at Chez Panisse, the first time I ate there, not long after it first opened. I didn't know enough about food then to know it was a sauce, and not a separate dessert. So, I ate it all by itself with a spoon. I still like it that way.

The easiest and best way to make creme Anglaise is to make a very rich "French vanilla," icecream -- and allow a bit of it to melt when creme Anglaise is needed. It's something like having your cake and eating it, but without the cake.

It's a good thing to remember. As long as you have ice cream you have a darn decent dessert sauce for a little fruit and a piece of cake or some crumbled cookies. This is all getting very Semi-Homemade. Watch out for tablescapes and girly drinks on the horizon.

9 egg yolks is 3/4 of the way there to a quart of French vanilla. Go for it.

BDL
post #16 of 21
Haha, that's so true. Sometimes if I'm making something a la mode I let the ice cream melt before I eat. I think that's what you're supposed to do honestly... no?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #17 of 21
The mention of pound cake reminded me: you could make sableuse. There's a recipe in Jean-Georges, by Vongerichten and Bittman. It's in effect a pound cake, made in a somewhat peculiar way, and Vongerichten swears by it. It uses a heck of a lot of egg yolks -- you might end up with extra egg whites if you make this one! But if my memory serves me, you're going to need a stand mixer or a very, very strong elbow.
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
It's great how you can get inspired to cook something you would never have made if it wasn't for the need to use leftovers!

OK so the first thing I thought about before posting this was also creme anglaise, followed closely by hollandaise.

However I had no idea creme anglaise was the starting point for ice cream! In fact I've never made ice cream. Hmmm... problem is I don't have an ice cream maker - I guess I could use the bowl of my food processor, cool it in the freezer, pulse, cool further, pulse, and finally let solidify in a thin layer inside a big container, in the freezer.

But I think I've got an idea - that might be easier to complete: I'm making Rum-Raisin Parfait. Now that sounds good. Never made it either, but it seems easier and doesn't require churning. I'm hoping it will keep for a few days to a couple of weeks in the freezer (we've still got a dozen financiers to eat!). Well I also have amaretti cookies and pistachios lying around so I may change my mind at the last minute as far as the flavor! :p

So thanks all for the inspiration. If it wasn't for the ice cream mentions, and creme anglaise remarks, I would never have thought of this.

I'll let you know how it turns out!

PS: now I also realize the most probable reason we put meringue on top of lemon tart: all those yolks in the lemon curd = lots of leftover whites! Makes sense! :lol:
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
OK I made the parfait. It's really good, but not so sure the rum-raisins were such a good idea, as they all sinked to the bottom.

The parfait itself though, with its raisinish rumish taste, was a success.

Weird thing: it tastes even smoother and buttery-er than ice cream, even though it has less cream and no butter. Oh well either way it's good.
post #20 of 21
You can mix the egg yolks with milk, vanilla, and sugar. The result will be what is called cream caramel after cooking it in the oven. You can also bake a chocolate cake in the oven by mixing flour, milk, vanilla, baking powder, chocolate powder, and sugar.
post #21 of 21
Actually, that's a flan, or a simple baked custard. What makes a flan, a creme caramel is prepping the bottom of the baking dish with a little, light caramel.

Interesting recipe.

BDL
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