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Brown sugar substitute

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Is there such a critter? I am not able to find a Domino type brown sugar here and have run out of my stash! I was wondering if you could take regular brown sugar and run it thru a food processor to make it really fine and use that as a sub. Any suggestions/ideas?
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
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If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
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post #2 of 11
If your saying you want superfine brown useing regular, that will work, then shake it thru a sieve. be careful that processor does not build up to much heat though...:D
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 11
a rose by any other name is a . . . .

marketing / common names vary - see

Questions and Answers - Types of Sugar

what is "brown sugar" in the Americas is available in Europe
post #4 of 11
What we Americans think of as "brown sugar," is white sugar with a little molasses added for taste and color. The darger brown the sugar, the more molasses.

You can process brown sugar to break up the clumps, but it will eventually clump up again. So your food processor idea is only as good as the amount of time between processing and use.

If you want it for baking purposes, you can use regular sugar plus molasses. I forgot the exact ratio, but I think it's like 7 sugar to 1 molasses for light brown, and about 4 to 1 for dark brown. You add the white sugar to the dry ingredients and the molasses to the wet.

You can buy raw cane sugars from ethnic markets ("gur" from Indian markets, for instance) and process those. I use "piloncillo" from Mexico as often as I use brown sugar, and much prefer the taste of it to brown.

BDL
post #5 of 11
If you want a granulated brown sugar you can bake the brown sugar.. flattened out on a sheet pan for about 10 to 15 min till a little color forms. Cool it down and process it in a robot coup and strain.
post #6 of 11
Got any tips for breaking the piloncillo up?
post #7 of 11
I bust the pilon into pieces with a 16 oz hammer. I suppose you could use a 22 oz waffle head, or a 12 oz finishing hammer. Your choice.

Then grind the pieces in the blender -- but a spice grinder or food processor would do almost as well. What makes the blender work so well, is that you can clean any sticking pieces out with a little ice, rum and juice -- if you get my drift.

BDL
post #8 of 11
Not sure, I get the drift, Im going to practice that a few times after work though, until I get that hang of that. :lips:
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Thanks to all for your help. I never knew molassess was used to make brown sugar. The stuff you learn here!
I've looked for it in most of the canton of Vaud and not found anything remotely like Dominos Brown Sugar. About the only place I've been able to get it is in a store about 75 kilometers from my place that carries American products. It's really expensive and they don't always have it in stock.
It may be found in Europe as suggested by Dillbert but I live in Switzerland which is a world all to itself! :)
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
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post #10 of 11
actually there's two ways to brown sugar - one is not the refine it that far, the other to add molasses back into the refined product.

we used to buy it at Edeka - but here's some links that may help - including a mail order source in CH - (info in comments)

Can I buy brown sugar here?? - English Forum Switzerland
The hunt for soft brown sugar
In need of some sugar! | From my Swiss window
post #11 of 11

brown sugar recipe

dark brown:

1 pound white sugar
3 oz molassas

light bown:

1 pound white sugar
2 oz molassas

run in the food processor until even in color.

from here:
Homemade Dark Brown Sugar Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network
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