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What makes a dish/meal romantic?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
In your opinion what makes a dish/meal romantic?
post #2 of 23
The people.


There are some food related concepts, but it's mostly about keeping it light so you don't feel bogged down, stuffed and lethargic afterwards for the rest of the romance.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 23
I find the setting to be the key to a romantic meal, and of course the company.
As far as foods, juicy strawberries, succulent lamb that leaves your mouth glistening with it's juices, etc.
Heck, I guess spaghetti could be romantic if you're into the Lady & the Tramp way of eating.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #4 of 23
I vote people first, setting second. The food is only incidental. I'd rather have cheap Chinese and fun conversation than five-star French with a wallflower.
post #5 of 23
This is a food forum: people don't count! :D

I think it's whatever says to the other person: "you are worth the effort". So homemade all the way...
post #6 of 23
The chemistry and connection of the people involved. It could be in a McDonalds.:D
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post #7 of 23
Come to think of it, some food that is traditionally "romantic" isn't so romantic. Lobster is too messy, oysters are super slimy and seem better fit for a beach picnic.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 23
I say, the amount of thought you put into making it really special for someone else other than you. For instance when I cook for NRatched, I cook HER favorites. Can be simple as steak and ice cream.

No stress and have the food just compliment the conversation/mood, not be the "focus"
post #9 of 23
Candles, flowers, martinis, and cleavage.

BDL
post #10 of 23
If we are going down that road, I'd say my answer is...

grilled cheese and..




....sex on the kitchen table
post #11 of 23
Ah 'tis spring, and a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of baseball.

BDL
post #12 of 23
In my opinion, lighting has a lot of influence on the feel and the mood of the room(s). With the rite or wrong lighting it can make or break a romantic feel.
post #13 of 23
For me, a romantic meal could be as simple as cold meat sandwiches, chips, fruit, and a pop or water, if it's in a beautiful location with someone I love. I don't need fancy but just making an extra effort to do something nice for me, whether cooking special food I love, or just picking a nice location and time is romantic.
post #14 of 23
personally we go for sitting on the floor in the living room, leaning against the sofa, lights down, background music, and a tray of cold tapas style food.
Shrimp, Chorizo, ripe peaches (messy isfine), asparagus, cheeses with oatcakes and an excellent red wine
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #15 of 23
If you're cooking for a "typical" aussie bloke - steak and chips with gravy in front of the tv watching footy with a coldie:beer:

Unfortunately. Plus the little woman to refill the beer and listen to him saying the umpire was wrong. :rolleyes: My apologies to any aussie guys who aren't that way.

Now my idea, being an individual, could be anywhere, any food, but definitely a one on one. NO mobile phones PLSSS!!!!!! Or TV. No computers lurking in the background waiting for e-mail replies....aaarrrghh!

You got it - we don't get many romantic dinners around here.

But what I really love is nicely clean set table, candlelight, minimal flowers, conversation that doesn't involve work, soft music, good plain, easy eating food, definitely something sweet to follow and a well matched wine to go with the meal. Oh, and dress up, but shoes off :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #16 of 23
That's the point. In the good old days which mostly sucked, people were supposed to be rather careful and prim about their self-presentation. These kinds of foods required (and allowed) people to let loose a bit, and gave them a legitimate social excuse to do so. These days, you're right -- kind of iffy for a fancy date.

But c'mon, really? You guys are full of it. "It's all about the people, it could be boiled turds with sulfur water, given the right lighting, I love her anyway, yadda yadda." Very romantic, I'm sure, but B.S. This sounds like an after-school special here.

I say the food has to be pretty good. I also say it shouldn't be fussy. The tricky bit is that "fussy" is 99.9(repeating)% how the dish appears, not what it actually is. You might serve a fabulous steak semi-plain, but you might also serve something that feels simple despite the incredible amounts of work that went into it. This is part of the art of a great chef: can you make a dish on which you and your brigade lavished ridiculous amounts of work appear simple and in a sense obvious? Can you allay that sense of obviousness with a hint of something unexpected, allowing the diners to spend a little time trying to figure it out -- but also let them have the fun of winning? Can you figure out how to take a couple through a meal and have them, at the end, be completely in unison -- perhaps discussing what they ate, and how cool it was, and how much fun they've had, and so on? Because if you have done this, you've created the situation for an intensely romantic meal. With any luck, the next day, they'll realize how much part your restaurant played in their evening, but at the moment they'll be otherwise occupied.

Incidentally, this complicated "what if" I've constructed here is precisely what kaiseki chefs do incredibly well. You spend the entire taxi ride home working together figuring it out, and you win at the end. You always do, no matter what you do and don't know, provided you have at least some remote clue what's going on in the first place. But the ultimate gourmet couple gets to their door having just figured "it" out -- and what they figured out was way different from what my wife and I figured out. Either way, you get home with this wonderful replete sensation: full in stomach and mind.

Then maybe you look into a little "dessert."
post #17 of 23
This is evil and wrong, and we don't have anything like it in the U.S. Umpires? Disgusting. In real football, they have refs.

Proper, which is to say American, football is all about refs. And timeouts. And taking a really, really, really long time doing anything. That's completely different, you see. It's an art, and specifically it's a martial art: listen to the guy next to you on the couch, as he explains how it's basically about war, and how this and that general and blah blah blah..... Well, I figure, if that game was good enough for Jesus, it's good enough for me. :crazy:

Steak and chips? Jeepers, these Aussies are babied -- Americans get spicy wings, bbq ribs, hamburgers, and the like, and they're very lucky indeed if they get it homemade instead of reheated from their favorite premade packages. Fries (i.e. chips) come frozen and get reheated in the oven according to package directions -- and if your wife doesn't love you any more, she does them in the microwave so they get mushy.

And then the guy and his pals get into this whole argument about whether Coors Ice is really better, and whether the seller has really handled it properly, and comparing it to Bud Light, and one guy is a Miller Lite fan, and then with any luck there's a serious foul or a touchdown or something because otherwise it's going to get ugly. Meanwhile the ladies are drinking cheap vodka mixed with a range of weird instant-drink mixers ("'nother margie, Janice, c'mon, lemme warm ya'up....") and at least one couple is going home in a taxi.

Superbowl, World Series, stuff like that -- that's a whole 'nother thread.

Just a little note from Chris, who is not always the most comfortable member of the Monday Night Football Couch Brigade in his blue-collar neighborhood.
post #18 of 23
This thread has deershanked my mind. Thanks, guys!

--Al
post #19 of 23
ginger
peanut butter
carrageen (irish sea moss seaweed extract)
oysters
chocolate
ox tail jelly
half a cow penis


make sure all meat is cooked


put in blender

sweeten with condensed milk, enrich with creme fraiche, flavor with almond extract and rose water

froth in order to make a foam

spoon around inverted toulies

serve slowly and with great anticipation
post #20 of 23
Do you have a "source"? Personally, I've never seen a "cow's penis", a "bull's penis" yes, but never a "cow's" ;)
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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #21 of 23
for me is the right people and something that you can fed to each other :D
post #22 of 23
[QUOTE=ChrisLehrer;263621]This is evil and wrong, and we don't have anything like it in the U.S. Umpires? Disgusting. In real football, they have refs.[\QUOTE\]

It is very evil and wrong. And don't forget the ketchup.

[QUOTE=ChrisLehrer;263621]Proper, which is to say American, football is all about refs. And timeouts. And taking a really, really, really long time doing anything. That's completely different, you see. It's an art, and specifically it's a martial art: listen to the guy next to you on the couch, as he explains how it's basically about war, and how this and that general and blah blah blah..... Well, I figure, if that game was good enough for Jesus, it's good enough for me. :crazy: [\QUOTE\]
Proper you say....heck...they spend half the time throwing the ball. How can that be called football? And what are the pals doing over at a romantic dinner anyway.....:lol:

[QUOTE=ChrisLehrer;263621]Steak and chips? Jeepers, these Aussies are babied -- Americans get spicy wings, bbq ribs, hamburgers, and the like, and they're very lucky indeed if they get it homemade instead of reheated from their favorite premade packages. Fries (i.e. chips) come frozen and get reheated in the oven according to package directions -- and if your wife doesn't love you any more, she does them in the microwave so they get mushy. [\QUOTE\]

Ahhh isn't love wonderful....its life as she is lived, in all her full glory.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #23 of 23
Picking up the check.......
Michael
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Michael
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