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pork with orange

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Many years ago there was a mexican restaurant in cambridge and i had an amazing pork chop done with orange. I don't know how the orange came into it, if it was marinated with orange juice, if it used some cointreau or something orangey, or if it was deglazed in orange. But it was incredible. I don;t generally like Mexican food, because I'm not used to such heavy seasonings and I can't really taste anything else most of the time. I also hate cilantro. But this was completely different.
Does anyone have a recipe for this?
Thanks
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #2 of 16
I know three Mexican /Central American/ South American pork chop in orange recipes. All three start with marinating the pork in an orangey (wait for it) marinade and then diverge. One is baked in a sauce which is mostly orange juice. The second is baked also, but has plenty of butter to hold the sauce together. The third is a breaded pork chop sauced in what's mostly a deglaze. Do any of those sound like yours?

Let me know, and I'll write one down. I only have very sketchy notes for these, and, for whatever unholy reason, they're in Spanish.

The foods most Americans think of as "Mexican" represent the border states and tourist destinations. There are lots of wonderful Mexican food that are (comparatively) delicately seasoned and cilantro free -- especially from the Mexico City area.

BDL
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
I was hoping you'd reply, bdl, since you have encyclopaedic knowledge of practically everything. I kind of guessed that mexican food MUST be more varied than what I usually find (not that there was much mexican stuff in Boston when i left in the 70s, and not that there is much of anything in Rome) because Mexico is a big country and i can't imagine it's so homogeneous as what filters up across the border.

Anyway, this dish was juicy and didn;t seem baked in any kind of liquid, because it was browned. Maybe my technique is not so good, but if i bake in liquid my meat comes out somewhat dry, even if it was browned first - that is, it may have water or sauce in it, but not the natural juice of the meat - and what i remember is it was actually juicy. (maybe my problem is a question of overcooking?) (Since I usually cook meat dry and at high temp, i don;t have a load of experience with wet-cooking methods - it's a vicious circle: i don;t like it so i don;t make it, and so i don;t make it well and so i don;t like it).

It wasn;t breaded, not that i remember that well (o, memory! over 35 years ago!) but it did seem a deglaze sauce. I was only beginning to cook back then so I wasn;t so attuned to the technical aspect of it all.

But whatever recipe you have, I;d be very happy to have it. Maybe I can adapt it.
When I've tried marinating or deglazing with orange it seemed too acid, and the dish i had was rich and warm, not sharp.
Thanks
Elaine
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #4 of 16
Siduri,

I know what you're talking about. For those of us who aren't Mexican it comes as serious mental collision the first time we have Mexican food that isn't, well, Mexican. No chiles, no cumin, no cheese, no beans. We don't have access to all the indigenous regional cuisines, and because we think we know Mexican food is, we never stop to realize they (of course) have a highly developed cuisine with European roots as well.

As to the pork chops, I think I put together something along the lines for which you're searching. It's a synthesis of two of the recipes I had with a recipe (actually four or five very similar recipes) I found searching Spanish language recipe sites. I finished this first draft today, and will try it myself sometime this or next week. If you make it before I do -- let me know what you did (you tweak everything!), and how it came out.

The idea looks great -- so thanks for pushing it. I'll save it to the CFG file. This seems like something RPMcMurphy would like too.

Anyway:

PORK CHOPS IN ORANGE (MEXICAN STYLE), aka
CHULETAS DE CERDO CON SALSA DE NARANJA

(Feeds 2 to 4, depending)


Ingredients, Marinade:
2 or 3 cloves garlic
Juice of 1 lemon or 2 limes
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp dried oregano (Mexican, if possible)
Kosher salt and pepper

Ingredients, Pork Chops:
4 pork chops, about 1/2" to 3/4" thick
Extra virgin olive oil
3 oranges
Extra orange juice, if needed
2 oz curacao or cointreau
2 tbs cold butter, cut in 4 pieces.

Technique:
Make a marinade by smashing the garlic, and combining these with the citrus juice, the oil, the oregano.

Salt and pepper the pork chops. Be very generous with the salt.

Add the pork chops to the marinade and turn them a few times so most of the salt goes into solution. Marinate the pork chops for about 1 hour, turning occasionally.

About ten minutes before cooking, remove the chops from the marinade, wipe them off, and set them aside to come to room temperature.

Meanwhile, peel one and a half of the oranges, completely removing the pith. Cut the orange(s) into slices, cover and reserve. Juice the remaining orange, and reserve the juice. You want about 1 cup of orange juice, total. Note: To peel "half an orange," cut the orange into three sections and peel the middle with a paring knife.

Heat a frying pan over a medium fire, add the olive oil to the pan, and when the pan comes to temp add the pork chops. Cook the pork chops until done, turning only once. Cooking time depends on thickness, but will be somewhere in the neighborhood of 5 to 7 minutes per side. Pork chops should be barely golden.

Remove the porkchops when they are cooked through, and hold (cover with foil if you like) on a preheated plate.

Add the orange slices to the pan and fry briefly on each side. They will be fragile and require careful handling. Remove the slices and plate them. Plate the pork chops on the orange slices. Alternatively, you may plate the slices on top of the chops.

Pour off any oil left in the pan. Return it to the fire, add the liqueur and deglaze. Add the orange juice, bring to the boil quickly, and reduce the liquid by about one third to one half. Lower the heat to low. Whisk in the butter in, piece by piece, adding each successive piece as the last one is about 2/3 incorporated. Stop adding butter when the sauce sets up, or you run out of butter -- whichever comes first.

Spoon a little of the sauce over the chops, reserving most of it for the plates themselves. Garnish each plate with a sprig of oregano.

Serve with pure de papa aka mashed potatoes.

Enjoy,
BDL

PS. This is an original recipe. You, the reader, have my permission to share this recipe as long as you credit it to me, Boar D. Laze. Please also mention my ultimately forthcoming book, COOK FOOD GOOD: American Cooking for Beginners and Intermediates.

PPS. This recipe was edited on 4/29 to reflect the experiences of the cooks in the discussion below.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
That sounds really nice, bdl, and i'll try it as soon as i get some more pork chops. Orange season is coming to an end so i want to try it soon.
thanks
i'll let you know
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 16
If you can get seville oranges, they'd probably be better for the purpose as your chop may well have been marinated in naranja agria. Daisy of Daisy Cooks did a similar pork chop seasoned with dry adobo and a short marinade( 10 mins or so) in naranja agria.

Naranja agria also goes well with achiote/annato paste.
Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 16
And BDL's two hours in lemon and lime juice seems long for how acidic that marinade will be. IMO.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

thanks!

Hi bdl,
I tried the recipe tonight. I didn;t have the ideal conditions since i got home from work at 8:30 and though i went way across town to the really good supermarket with the best pork chops yesterday, they didn;t have any pork chops left, so i bought an "arista" roast pork and sliced it myself. (Not as good as the chops though)
Then i didn;t have any limes, and i didn;t have 2 hours to marinate. Did the marinade with juice of a lemon and some grated orange peel and the rest of the ingredients.
The rest i followed pretty closely.
Despite the variations it was really good.
I think maybe i would modify the orange juice deglaze - just a bit too acidy, or - hmm, don;t know what , nor "warm" enough, though the cointreau did warm it up and the butter even more. I added salt to the orange and that helped too.
The orange slices were a great touch.
Anyway, it was a sort of slapdash attempt but really good anyway.
thanks
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #9 of 16
Siduri,

My pleasure as always. And thank you for the great description of your ingredients and technique.

I'm pretty sure I know what you mean by making the orange sauce "warm" the sauce with alcohol and butter. Good term, warm. I just bought a pork loin today and will slice some chops and use it to make the recipe or something like it tomorrow.

Which sort of oranges were you using? I'll be using (California) Valencias.

Based on your experience, I'll deglaze with the liqueur (to concentrate it) then add the orange juice. I'll also mount more butter than I had in the original recipe .

Perhaps the Curacao and Cointreau choices were too orangey? Maybe better with a smooth rum like Brugal, or cognac? That could cut both the sweetness and the acidity a little. Or maybe tequila? Tequila plays so well with acids.

Between the two of us, I think we can get it fairly well perfected with one more try. I'll write back tomorrow or Wednesday.

BDL
post #10 of 16
BDL,

Do you have any suggestions for flavoring on the pure de papa that you mentioned? I have little experience with mexican cooking, but I always like trying new things, and there's a 50/50 chance I try this recipe tomorrow night depending on how my day goes. Off the top of my head, maybe a roasted anise and chili combo would complement the dish well. I'm not sure if this is at all traditional mexican either. If I do get the chance to try it, I'll let you know how it went. Thanks!
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
BDL, i really liked the cointreau, and anyway, i don't have any ofthe other liqueurs since i don't drink them and use only a couple of things in cooking - dry vermouth because i rarely have wine on hand and because julia child used to recommend it, brandy, for an occasional chicken liver mousse and for deglazing meat sometimes, and cointreau for my yearly (very moist and really good) fruitcake at christmas, both for soaking the fruit and for putting on the fruitcake. That's it, so luckily i had it on hand. Never developed a taste for alcohol except for nice beers, it just makes me feel sick. Yes, the cointreau made the warmth, as would the brandy i guess.

I'll try it with lime when i find some - thought i had it but couldn't find it in the chaos of my refrigerator, but i think it would be good.

The oranges were italian oranges, not blood oranges, but regular ones, i don't remember the type, but sweet california type oranges, i guess. I think they may not be as sweet as the california type, that may be the problem.

anyway, will definitely be making it again.
Thanks for bringing back this nice taste.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #12 of 16

Schuster

Schuster,

Do us both a favor and read Siduri's post and my follow up before following the "recipe," posted in this thread. I've already made several changes to my copy based on Siduri's experience and on thoughts I had before she cooked. For instance, deglazing with the liqueur and not the juice is something of a no brainer.

Also, the way the butter is incorporated into the pan reduction is called "mounting." Exactly how much butter you use is more about a particular texture and gloss you get from adding butter in this way, than about using a particular amount suggested by the recipe writer. Fortunately, you know it when you see it. When it looks good, turn off the fire, add one more little piece and whisk it in.

Also, I'm thinking about dredging the chops in flour before cooking them to help set everything up later on. But of all of the two dozen or so recipes I looked at, a few were breaded in breadcrumbs, and the rest completely bare.

Mexicans like mashed potatoes. It's not all rice and beans. They also really like to use leftover mashed potatoes for a bunch of things. Typically, their mashed aren't as creamy as ours, but stiffer -- less milk. less butter, fairly lumpy (which is better for using in follow up recipes because they hold up). Compared to North Americans they use plenty of black pepper. They have some potato choices we don't and I think use slightly waxier potatoes than I'd choose for mashing.

I'll probably make mine from russets, fairly creamy but light, with black pepper, and a little rosemary. The big thing with mashed potatoes always, always, always, is not to overwork them. Don't overwork them, use hot milk (you can heat it with the potatoes just before mashing), season before mashing, and use cold butter -- and you can't go wrong.

Payback time: Please let me know what you did as specifically as you can remember and your reactions to it. It seems like a very sound dish, and I'd really like to get it perfected (in the technical, "recipe ready" sense) quickly.

BDL
post #13 of 16
BDL and Siduri,

The weather worked out such that I cancelled my outdoor plans for the day and did a lot of cooking for a few friends. I plan on making this dish tomorrow for my girlfriend though, and will let you know the results.

BDL,

I have paid careful attention to both your and Siduri's notes. I am not very familiar with mexican flavors, but the technique is familiar to me. I will do my best to take note of what the two of you have put forth to replicate and offer improvements. I do have to go to the liquor store tomorrow to pick up any of the options you guys listed, so if you are curious about the results of any particular liquor, let me know and I'll give it a shot and report my results.
post #14 of 16
Schu,

It wasn't the weather, but the woman. She was feeling poorly, and outvoted me on the porkchops in favor of fried chicken and biscuits. So, one hopes, pork chops today. In any case -- same boat.

That's a pretty accomodating offer on the alcohol choices. I'd say go for the rum if you can find a nice dark one with some character, like Brugal, at a reasonable price. I buy it at the Mexican market (King) for $10, but BevMo sells it for $19. You can probably guess which one is considered "reasonable." Funny thing, Linda was always carping about using something "better" for her baking with rum projects until discovering it was expensive.

Anyway, the reason for rum is that it's (a) just nice to have around in the liquor cabinet, (b) it's pleasant on its own, and (c) it gets used up in a reasaonable amount of time unlike things like curacao which can sit around for years unless they're components of some particular cocktail beloved by your beloved(s). Anyway, I've got a bottle of curacao so I'll probably either go that way, "poor man's Grand Marnier" (half curacao or triple sec, half cognac), or the tequila.

According to Escoffier (and a lot of other people) there are four kinds of cuisine: High, bourgeios, regional, impromtu. We're used to thinking of regional and perhaps regional/bourgeios as the universe of Mexican food. This is more high/bourgeois. In other words, while it's authentically Latin American it's not going to scream "Mexican" so much as whisper "Mexico City."

I can't help but think of the thread you started about ingredient pairings and combinations. If you were trying to bring this upscale and into "fine dining" you would consder flavoring the mashed potatoes with celery root or parsnips, and using Pernod as the deglaze. At this particular moment on the trend wave orange elicits thoughts of fennell, anise and celery root; while mashed potatoes are associated with any and all roots and rutabagas. No doubt your chef has asked you about some of these combinations.

BDL
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yeah, i agree. Celeriac and potatoes is a particularly happy combination, i think.
I just ask, please don;t put the nice, juicy pork chop on top of the mashed potatoes. I really hate that. The juice gets lost in the potato, the chop gets this creamy thing on it that really doesn;t enhance it but takes away the flavor. They're a nice foil for each other but not mixed - if the eater wants to mix them he always can. (my husband will mix anything together but that's his business!)
i believe i ended up in an argument once in one of these posts about that.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #16 of 16
Tried it, and like it quite a bit. I've already adjusted the recipe to reflect some of the changes. Waiting on Schuster. The amounts of liqueur (I used curacao) and butter in the recipe worked well for me -- but my oranges were somewhat bogus. A little on the dry side, and not very sweep. I had to do three of them to get 6 slices which would hold together, and also added some sweeter OJ, I had in the fridge to make up the quantum necessary for the sauce. That's the way it goes sometimes.

Linda liked it too.

If it hadn't been for the clarity of the note sounded by the Mexican oregano, I might have guessed "Spanish." Linda guessed, "Californian." Flip the herbs to thyme and rosemary and it would be very Mediterranean/Californian indeed. The pan reduction technique is pure French, but so what? The dish was inspired by Siduri's meal at a Mexican restaurant, and by research I did referencing Mexican, Central and South American web sites.

BDL
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