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Kangaroo

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So, I've been doing alittle reading on kangaroo meat. Seems very healthy, low fat.

I found a couple websites that offer it via mail order, it just pains to me to pay like $30 shipping!

So this morning, my sister calls me from DC and says, "what was that nasty meat you wanted to try?" I laughed and said Kangaroo! She replied, "gross, but ok!" and hung up.

A few minutes later she called me back and said I should have a package this week with my name on it. She ordered me some online...

I cant wait to get it. I'm not sure what I'll do with it...but i am excited. I believe she ordered the 4 4oz filet mignon cuts!

Here's a shot in the dark, anyone ever make it before? I was thinking/have read medium rare is best prep...perfect for me. I am thinking get the old cast iron pan screamin hot with some olive oil and butter in it, S&P on the steak, get a good sear on it. VOILA!

unless someone knows of another good idea.

I AM SOOOO EXCITED!
post #2 of 14
That's pretty much it, with the addition of a bit of resting time when out of the pan. Pairs beautifully with Beetroot and sweet berry based sauces. Due to the low fat content it can be helped along by marinating before hand in Olive Oil and Herbs.

Here in Australia it's one of the cheapest meats around. The fillets by weight are about 1/2 the price of standard beef mince. Hard to put on a menu though as a lot of trade is tourist based and some tend to get freaked out that we eat an animal that is on our Coat of Arms.
post #3 of 14
We eat it a lot. Cook it like you both said, I like a sweet port wine sauce with it, lots of pepper.

Or do it as a stir fry, finely shredded with usual aromatics. But make sure you only cook the meat long enough to just brown it, then straight out of the wok, cook your veg -capsicum (bell peppers) go well, mushrooms, bok choy, mung bean sprouts. Then add your sauces into your veg mix- soy/oyster,sesame oil, bit of rich chicken stock, thicken with cornflour slurry, add meat in to re-heat for 30 second, take off heat, add finely sliced scallion, serve over rice/noodles. Yummers!

We're doing the country a favour by eating them - there are more of them than people here, they are in plague proportions.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Just curious my Aussie buddies, they have 'Roo in the grocery stores meat counter so you can get it fresh? or is it frozen? both?

what do you pay per pound?

like i said, my sister got me this stuff, $40/lb! I dont know if I would have spent that much, but she got a new job making some real good money and wanted to share I guess. I am not complaining, and just cant wait to get it! I am thinking it might come tomorrow or saturday!

Someone said it is similar to ostrich? Last time I made ostrich, I marinated it in red wine and some herbs and seared it real nice and i made a pomegrante and balsamic reduction that went fabulous with it. but that wasnt the first time I had it. While I am sure that same sauce or something with berries would be great, I want to see what it really tastes like...part of me wants to know why it costs so dang much! Maybe its just bc its a novelty item here state-side.

i am now wondering what do "we" eat on a regular basis that you Aussie's cant get or if you can its at a premium price.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Or you know what.... i believe the way the steaks come, it is 4, 4oz filets. Maybe I make it 4 different ways!

or maybe i am just off the deep end and making much more out of this than it really is...

and with all my crazy talk about what i can do with it and what ppl on here say, my wife isnt nearly as excited to try it!
post #6 of 14
Hmm no we get it fresh, same as steak or chicken etc from the butcher. Can also get mince which is great for burgers/ meat sauces for pasta dishes. It's about
AUS$17 per kg, which works out (very roughly) USD$20 per kg, or USD$10 per pound.

If you use it in a stir fry, the meat will go a lot further. But I would try it both ways to experiment. Certainly a marinade like with the ostrich would work well - I'd do it for 24 hours for max. effect. It's pretty similar in taste, or if you've had venison, try and imagine that and what would work with it. It's probably very overpriced and just a specialty/novelty type item (not wanting to put you off), but it is very low fat and nice done as rare as you can take it. But do get it to room temp for an hour first and give it time to rest if you're pan frying.

If I could wish for anything from the US it would be clams, fresh ones (tinned are awful) and we don't seem to get them fresh here. I'd love to try a clam chowder. (I think they are called cockles here - I may be wrong - and they get used for fish bait, so there's a bit of reluctance to try them). Apart from that, I think we've got pretty much everything available here, you have to search a bit sometimes.

Oh, Gravdlax is as rare as hen's teeth - wish I could get that easily, same as rollmops :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 14
:eek:

Is there a demand to justify such a high price or is that in line with other meat prices in Australia?

You'll have to pardon my ignorance though, I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to things outside of my own borders sadly.
post #8 of 14
You need to move to Hobart :P

Fillets here ~ $10kg and mince @ $7kg. Plenty of Gravlax and Rollmops too :lol:
post #9 of 14
Hang on....rollmops been banned in Tassie Psy
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #10 of 14
I stand corrected, but was sure I saw some recently.
post #11 of 14
Oy. 1 AUS = 0.74 USD. That means 17 AUS/kg = 12.58/kg USD. Or about $5.71/lb US.

BDL
post #12 of 14
I thought kangaroo was extremely lean, like elk and venison, right? In that case you have to be very, very careful not to overcook it or it's going to be dry as the Sahara. If it's steaks, cook them very rare and let them rest. If you deal with larger pieces and don't feel like braising, you might want to consider larding them.

You can actually make a rather good clam chowder from canned clams, if it means that much to you. They're awful used just about any other way, but, following Julia Child's suggestion, I was very pleasantly surprised by canned whole clams in chowder. (Real chowder, I mean, not that nasty red stuff. :lol:)

I think cockles are little tiny clams, which are either very expensive or very cheap, depending on factors I know nothing about. What we usually think of as clams in the Northeast, anyway, are much bigger, like 2" across or more. Those little ones I think are best used in things like Chinese black bean sauce dishes, where their sweetness shines and the annoyance of picking them turns into the fun of sucking on them.
That you can make yourself very easily. Ingredients: fish, salt, dill, sugar, dash of booze. Cheap, easy, and lots of fun. The only downside is you'll have to have a party or something, because if you have two whole cured salmon sides, you'll start to get sick of it. BDL has an extensive recipe-post about how to make it around here somewhere.
post #13 of 14
You're right, Chris, about cockles. In the U.S., at least, they refer to a size, and are the smallest commercially available clams.

IIRC, the sizes increase in this order: cockles, Manila, steamer, littleneck, cherrystone, Ipswitch (which has another name as well, which I forget at the moment). Razor clams, obviously, do not fit in this rubric, nor do the giant geoducks of the PNW.

In Europe, however, cockles are an actual bivalve, related to, but not classed as, a clam. You remember sweet Molly Malone? Cockles, and mussels, alive, alive-oh.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 14
No pardoning needed. The kangaroo price is actually not a bad price for a fillet of red meat here - a proper beef fillet will cost you upward pf AUS$35 per kg- and that's from the supermarket.

But you do need to be very careful of overcooking it - it rapidly turns to shoe leather. Think its about (I could be wrong) 97% fat free - but when you hit it right - YUM!

Might be brave and try a tinned clam (proper) chowder. Always looked at them, tried them in all the wrong ways. Might follow a recipe next time hehe :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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