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Crumbling pie crust

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I work in a restaurant in a small community in Northarn Maine. I make alot of pies and have worked hard to better my pie crust. The recipe that I use is...

22oz of Lard
8 cups of Flour (all purpose)
4 teasp. salt
2 tblsp. sugar
2 tblsp. white vinegar
2 eggs
water

In the mixer, I add dry ingredients with the lard until it begins to crumble.

In a measuring cup I add eggs, vinegar and water to 1 1/2 cups and mix up with a fork.
I add the liquid to the crumble until it all just pulls together a then stop mixing.

I am at a loss as to how I can produce a better crust in a mixer (all of my co-workers would quit if I insisted that we make them by hand) and I get alot of compliments from customers, however, I get alot of complaints from the waitresses that they have trouble serving my pie aspecially when they are in a hurry. They use the edge of a pie server or a table knife to cut them and the crust body breaks and the edges break and fall off.

I have been asked by my boss to fix this problem.

How can I do this without making a tough crust?

What they were use to prior to me was a pie crust that was more similar to pasta dough or bread dough and prodused a crust that you could throw across the room like a frisbee and it would hold together.

What am I doing wrong or what am I missing.

Help!!
post #2 of 5
I think a little butter to replace the lard. Lard crust is wonderful for its flakiness, butter crust has great flavor, but a mixture would probably make a good tasting, but slightly (slightly) less crumbly flaking crust.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
If my boss will let me use butter I will give it a try. Anything to avoid going back to what they use to do.

thanks!!
post #4 of 5

Ratios

Try playing with your food.

for a pie dough you want a ratio of

3 parts flour

2 parts fat

1 part liquid


Looks like you need more icy cold water, try to add more and let the dough rest in the cooler for a few hours so the flour can hydrate.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #5 of 5

Pastry Chef

It's important not to work the dough too much, as you know. In my opinion, I'd rather have a nice, flakey crust that might fall apart a little rather than a solid, horrid, tough crust!

As others have said, play around with the ratio of flour to shortening and water. It's better to err by having too much shortening and less flour.
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