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How does the texture of gellato compare to ice cream?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm making gellato tomorrow, never made gellato before, never ate gellato before.

How does the texture of gellato compare to ice cream?

TIA:crazy:
post #2 of 21
I'd have to say.....density.....gelatos as a rule will contain much less air...
basic recipe would be 2 qt heavy cream, 2 qt milk, 2 lbs sugar, 30 egg yolks.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thank you sir.
post #4 of 21
But gelati are usually kept at a higher temperature than ice cream so that it has a soft, scoopable texture out of the case.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ah, make sense, what kind of temperature?

Do I still run it through my ice cream maker?
post #6 of 21
The idea was that European gelato shops keep their cold cases a few degrees warmer than American ice cream shops. Don't let that bother you. Keep your hands off the freezer control.

Make your gelato in an ice cream maker, and allow it to ripen just as you would any ice cream.

The difference between "gelato" and "ice cream" to the extent that their is one, is that ice cream is a very elastic term, and gelato a bit more defined.

Gelatos are typically in the mid range of amount of fat, and usually use a fair amount of egg yolk to keep the cream's texture smooth. Sometimes they don't use egg yolks but use corn starch. So, as you can see, gelatos are (often) frozen custards. However, people and language being what they are, the terms have softened to the point where gelato doesn't have much more meaning than "frozen dairy-based dessert." Do a little research and you'll find recipes for granitas labled as gelato.

Let me add a word about "density." Ice creams should contain as little air as possible. The idea that the dashers in ice cream makers, "aerate" the cream is not only false but 180* out of phase. In fact, the dashers knock air out. With any ice cream, it's good technique to have as little air as possible in the base before freezing. I sieve the base before chilling, and before freezing.

Also as with ice cream, the colder the base before going into the freezing chamber, the smoother the final cream (fewer, smaller ice crystals). So, if you're using an ice cream maker which doesn't have it's own refrigerator/freezer compressor (that is, if you put the container in the freezer to "pre-freeze," or you use ice and rock-salt), get that base as cold as possible before starting the freezing process.

Ciao for niao,
BDL
post #7 of 21
BDL,
can you go into a little more depth about air content in ice creams and
gelatos......I was under the impression that paddles, more specifically auger style paddles were for just that purpose.....I certainly am no expert. Also was wondering how run of the mill ice creams did get so much air into thier product. Would love to know more.
post #8 of 21
Manufacturers of ice creams made for supermarket sale face an array of considerations other makers whether home, restaurant or parlor do not.

One of the most important is stability before, during and after transit -- with the various temperature changes involved. Another is the relationship between weight and volume. A manufacturer wants the gallon container to always hold the same amount; and may want "Lite" ice cream to weight less. Consequently these manufacturers use emulsifiers, stabilizers and air incorporation -- while other makers may not. Super premium manufactures like Ben and Jerry tend to stay away from these practices and more closely approach "home made," or "parlor" style creams.

A big issue all ice cream makers face, including little guys like us, is texture. Smoothest texture and best mouthfeel comes from controlling the amount of air and the size and amount of ice crystals. There's an inter-dynamic because an airy base promotes the formation of large ice crystals. Honestly, I'm not a good enough chemist to explain the reasons behind crystal size. However, for whatever reason, if the base is stabilized at a low temperature before freezing, that will help make a smooth product. So too, does knocking the air out of the base. As with making almost any smooth sauce, sieving is one of the differences between pros and joes.

The paddles and screws used in small batch churns (called "dashers"), as well as the speed of the churn, are designed so as not to incorporate extra air.

The big guys can get away with a lot of stuff ("stuff" as in "stuff happens") because they use a lot of additives and special machinery. The rest of us are stuck with doing it right.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #9 of 21
Kinda sorta. Have used conditioners and stabalizers, but am not fond of them because they seem to create a gelato or ice cream with more air....on the other hand...if I'm making a sorbet and the sugar, solid, water ratio is of....it helps with scoopability....don't think thats a word. I enjoy your posts BDL. Thanks very much.
post #10 of 21
Sorry you never had European, especially Italian, Gelato as there is a tremendous difference in the taste and texture. At least then you'd have something to compare it to.

The recipe shown above is actually more for ice cream than gelato. In Italy, they do not use cream at all but use the highest butterfat content whole milk they have. When making it here in the US, we have to add a little cream, not equal amounts, to bring the fat content up as our milk has a lower fat content. Overall, gelato is lower in fat than ice cream as the "cream" in gelato is much, much lower.

If you are making a custard style gelato (where vanilla will be your base flavor) you use the egg yolks. If you are making it with fruit, like strawberry, peach or whatever, then you use the milk/cream with no eggs. We've made it often and with summer upon us the bowl for the ice cream maker will be a regular in the freezer.

There are so many variations of gelato and too many resemble ice cream here in the US. If you want the recipe I use, just post again and I'll put it on: with and without eggs

If you make a TRUE gelato, you won't want ice cream ever again!!
post #11 of 21
>>especially Italian, Gelato as there is a tremendous difference in the taste and texture. At least then you'd have something to compare it to.

so glad to see that - I was afraid I'd wasted all those Lira.....

>>If you make a TRUE gelato, you won't want ice cream ever again!!
oh dear. that's a bit overboard <g>.

gelato and ice cream are as related only in the sense of creme brulee = vanilla pudding.
and, gelato ain't gelato, even in Italy. every state/city/vendor is slightly not the same.
post #12 of 21
Dilbert...

You just found the wrong gelaterias.... I've found some, including some that are award winning, that make some OUTSTANDING gelato.

Sorry buddy, but if you're spending Lira, it's been too long;)

Homemade here is not as good as gelateria there but it'll do!!
post #13 of 21
hmmmm, I wrote something wrong ....

what I meant to convey: gelato varies by shop - which shop is "best" is cause for street fights <g> but I liked pretty much all of them.

>>Lira - I've been at it for a while . . .
post #14 of 21
Yes... for sure... they all vie for "who's" is the best and they are very, VERY boastful about it.

Hmmm.... I can see gelato in the offing before the weekend is out!!:D
post #15 of 21
Want to try an experiment? 1 quart of water weighs approx 2 pounds. Next time you buy cheap off brand ice cream in a 1/2 gal container weigh it. it wont even weigh 2 lbs . What you are buying is injected air and stabilizers and starches. Also notice in the frzen ice cream case some of them now dont say ice cream anymore. They say frozen dessert or confection.. Now take a pint of Hagen Daz and weigh it, Bet it weighs at least a pound. You get what you pay for. When the 1/2 gaL CHEAP ONE melts you are lucky to find a Quart of liquid ?yet its a 1/2 gallon thats because you lost the air.
Yield wise Hagen Daz is not only better, it is cheaper or only a few cents more. Also a 1/2 gallon of ice cream now is packed only 3 quarts, its called progress.;)

P/S I had Gellato in Italy a few years ago the worst stuff I ever ate it was loaded with Ice crystals.:eek:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #16 of 21
ChefEd...

You hit a BAD gelateria!! I've had a lot of gelato in Italy and I'm careful about where I get it. If you hit a good one, or even average, you'd be searching for it a few times a day!!!

Better yet, come here Ed and I'll make you some!! :cool:
post #17 of 21
if it was, it was a bad gelato. i am no expert but a good gelato is smooth and creamy a bad gelato is like a poorly formed sorbet. crunchy ice crystals all through.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Is the gelato suppose to be a solid/thick liquid before putting in the ice creme maker? Mine seems more on the runny side.
post #19 of 21
Depends on the recipe. Some gelatos are almost custards before freezing. Others are quite liquid. Just make sure it's very well chilled; and that you sieve it, if possible, before putting it in your ice cream freezer. That will help make for a smooth gelato.

The sieve is your friend.

BDL
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I'll give it a go. My egg yokes seemed a little small, they were "extra large" eggs, but they yokes were about the size of a medium egg.
post #21 of 21
runny is okay as the cold of the machine will get it to set up nicely.

Enjoy!
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