ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › New Smoker, and home a lone all weekend...whats a guy to do?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New Smoker, and home a lone all weekend...whats a guy to do?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
So dad gave me his handmedown brinkman electric smoker (the cheapo one from home depot), I know...electric, bad, but..it's a smoker, and the only one I have.

what should I smoke first, then second.
post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 


is the one i have, p.s. no clue how to use it either.
post #3 of 18
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Some backstory...

Dad pawned off his old smoker to me because he got his cool new advanced super duper smoker (basically, because he couldn't figure out how to use the old one so he went with a more "intelligent" model. aka retard proof, here is the one he got Amazon.com: Bradley Digital 4- Rack Smoker: Patio, Lawn & Garden)

he handed me down this one Amazon.com: Brinkmann 810-7080-8 Gourmet Electric Smoker and Grill with Vinyl Cover, Red: Patio, Lawn & Garden

Now, I need to show him how I can make better food with his handmedowns, and make him frustrated he just spent 500 bucks....its a father son thing. haha.

So, going to pick up a boston butt tomorrow and smokeaway on saturday. Looking for direction on type of wood chunk (that ill have to get at the home depot/lowes/supermarket), technique, rubs, and sauce!


but also going to give hand at smoking some other things as well.....you know i have the sausage maker too!!!
post #5 of 18
Salmon or most any fish is a good start.

Hot wings. Then thin ranch dressing 50/50 with your preferred barbecue sauce for dip.

salt, paprika off to the side. Good stuff.

A steak then grill to finish.

beer can chicken.

Go read Peace Love and Barbecue and you'll get plenty of ideas (nachos, spaghetti...)
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #6 of 18

technical issues

You'll want a remote thermometer in there too so you can see how hot it actually gets until you "learn" your smoker.

Sand is often used in the water tray as a thermal sink to help control (stabilize/maintain) temperature. But consider using water sometimes so you can use the liquid for a barbecue stock (bones from ribs or butts/shoulders) Smoke vegies for the stock too.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
alton's recipe looks like it has some good reviews...
Pulled Pork Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network
post #8 of 18
That particular smoker is known for not getting up to decent temps. Keep it out of the wind and rain. Pork shoulder is pretty forgiving so its a good starting point, so is a beef chuck roast. Cook either to an internal temp of 195+(stick a fork in and twist, if it doesn't shred the meat it is not done). Hot smoking fish as others suggested works fair on those also. Ribs and brisket are a bit more of a challenge as far as hitting the right level of done.
post #9 of 18
Do a google search for Steven Raichlen or you can even get the first season of Primal Grill off of Netflix if you have a Netflix account, great stuff and its all about smoking and grilling. Also you may want to do some research on his site (i don't have enough posts to link to another site) so if you google his name the 3 link down 'Steven's Blog' will bring you to his site. The message board is loaded with great info and helpful people.

Enjoy your smoker you can and will make some great meals.
post #10 of 18
When you tire of that el cheapo's performance, get yourself one of these and you'll be glad you did.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 18
Umm, err, uhhhhh......




I could use some help with the 20 slabs of spareribs, 4 full briskets and 20 lbs of Boston butts I have to do for a BBQ in two weeks.:smiles::roll::crazy: Oh yeah....can't forget the wings. But those are last to do anyhow.
That is if ya wanna load it up and head down I-95 for the weekend......

Neat smoke there. Never used one of those kettle types. Never really heard anything bad about them but I don't know too many folks that have'em.

Saw a Traeger at the local ACE Hardware yesterday that MaryB bought. Didn't expect to see them there! That sure is a worry free smoker!!!! An auger to feed wood pellets to the fire tray. Nice idea! But the one I saw......at 1400.00!!!! I'll load for now!:look::D
post #12 of 18
Oldschool1982:

The WEBER SMOKEY MOUNTAIN bullet smoker more than compensates for all the negativity that you've heard concerning Brinkmans. The WSM is THE bullet smoker (if you're into those) to get. Trust me on this one and I highly recommend that you navigate around the link I provided and visit the user forums at that site. With one load of charcoal the WSM will maintain a steady grill temperature of 230 for 15-20 hours, time sufficient for 1-3 10 pound boston butts, with very minimal intervention that only amounts to occasional meat basting and vent adjustments.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
fortunately, and unfortunately this is all i got for now.
post #14 of 18
I know several boaters who own the Brinkmann like yours and here's what I've heard stated (paraphrased):

"We put our chickens in the unit in the morning and by the time we dock in the afternoon they're done and ready to eat." HTH and enjoy. But should you decide to further explore bullet smoking, the WSM would be the unit to get. Go ahead and explore the website I provided and also I think there's one devoted to Brinkmann's like yours.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #15 of 18
Of all the low and slow barbecue meats, baby back ribs and pulled pork are the ones most likely to net a beginner good results.

With baby back ribs (aka BBs), the best technique is something called 2,1,1. If it's what you want to do first, I'll rewrite my recipe for you and post it.

But you were thinking of pulled pork and mentioned Alton Brown's recipe. His recipe is OK without being blow-away good. The rub isn't particularly Alton Brown either -- more Michael Chiarello to the point where it's surprising Brown didn't give MC props. Their version has a decided Italian twist. Brown suggests brining the butt -- something I used to do. In fact, I daresay I've brined a lot more butts than he has. Injection does the same thing and does it better.

I'm going to post more of a "comp" style recipe in a separate thread. That is, it's not only more typical of what you'd find in a KCBS (Kansas City Barbecue Society) or MIM (Memphis in May) barbecue competition, it's also more typical of what you'd find in a good, southern barbecue joint. In other words, a better place to start especially if you want some Americana with your 'q.

Barbecue technique is extremely smoker dependent. RPM, I don't really know the electric version of your smoker that well. The charcoal version (know that one all too well) is popularly called the ECB -- short for El Cheapo Brinkmann. Zillions of people start with ECBs. They're notoriously bad performers out of the box. They can be modded to perform a lot better, but unfortunately "a lot better" is a relative term, and in the case of an ECB it still means "not very well." Those who decide to keep barbecuing usually move on to better as soon as they can afford it. My guess is that the electric version shares most of the same handicaps. Still, it's worth cranking out at least one season's worth of 'q to see if you enjoy the process. If it's something you want to do more often, nothing can stop you from moving up the equipment longer.

A word about kokopuff's enthusiastic recommendation of the WSM (Weber Smokey Mountain): Yes. Fantastic. Wonderful. Not what I use, but probably the best way to get into serious barbecue for most people. Now that Weber has come out with a 22-1/2" model, they've beat the biggest criticism of the beast. It's now big enough to hold slabs of ribs without pinwheeling or trimming.

The one piece of extra equipment I know you'll NEED is a good thermometer. There's one that stands out, and that's the Maverick (aka RediChek) ET-73. It's a dual probe model which monitors the pit's temperature as well as the meat's internal. The ET-73 is a remote read which means you don't have to spend all day sitting on the pit to keep track of progress, nor do you have to open it to get a read. There are two other brands which do the same things, but they're either quite a bit more expensive and/or not as good. ET-73. Not ET-7 or ET-71, but ET-73. You can find them at several places on the web for under $40. Here's one link: Maverick Remote Smoker Thermometer ET-73 from iKitchen.com Get one ASAP, it makes the process a lot more pleasant.

BDL
post #16 of 18
For analog, dial type thermometers to be mounted permanently into the lid of the unit, I recommend TelTru barbecue thermometers.

On my WSM I've smoked lots of boston butts and jerkey and made my share of buckboard bacon. And I use the Maverick ET73, too.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 18
RPM..

Why not try a small turkey? The taste is amazing and the bird stays juicy... simple too just a rub and some good wood and let the puppy go!!

Just call me when it's ready:D
post #18 of 18
RPM: <Dad pawned off his old smoker to me because he got his cool new advanced super duper smoker>

"How sharper than a serpent's tooth...." ;)

Mike

My emphasis
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › New Smoker, and home a lone all weekend...whats a guy to do?