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Competition Style Barbecue Pulled Pork, Plus Dijon Vinegar sauce - Page 2

post #31 of 49
if ya guys wana pop on over to my other initial thread and give me some pointers on smoking a chicken tomorrow, I'll have another pour of tequila for ya.

192.
post #32 of 49
done and resting.

made BDL's sauce.....awaiting inhalation.


snuck a quick taste of the pork....mmmm.
post #33 of 49
Same process for the chicken other than I drape bacon over the bird to baste it as the bacon cooks down. The standard butter/herbs under the skin is good too. Unless you crisp the skin up under the broiler or on the grill it is going to be rubbery. Pork rub usually works well on chicken also.
post #34 of 49
<<...seems like the thermometor is stuck on 180 though... smoker temp 238>>

LID TEMP (or GRATE TEMP) = 238
MEAT TEMP = 180

The meat has reach a plateau and will remain so, at 180F, for 1 or more hours. And the plateau is quite normal and always occurs with my boston butts. During the time that the meat plateaus methinks that the connective tissue is absorbing all of the heat energy for it to breakdown and "tenderize" the butt.

Again, plateaus are normal.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #35 of 49
SO here are some pics....

first my tequila old fashioned








post #36 of 49
this 5 image limit stinks!



I'm very happy with the results of the first time me smoking something. However, I have to critique the recipe a little BDL. it was a 7.4lb butt, and I probably used half the rub, and used the injection as well, and it came out pretty salty. too salty, I'd cut the salt in both at least in half.

Other than that, came out great!! ended up eating around 10:30-11ish after it rested for almost an hour.

Did a chicken today, came out even better. Threw a lump of frozen duck fat in the cavity, and believe it or not, used some free Emerils essence and chicken rub I got as a goodie bag when I had lunch with him last week.

post #37 of 49
Eeeeehhhhhhhhh, you need to email me a taste NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 
Glad it worked out. Sorry about the salt. I had a tbs/tsp error in the injection. I fixed that and edited the rub recipe to reflect your experience.

You got more rub on the butt that I would have thought possible; and I also wonder if you're using Diamond Kosher or Morton for your rub. Morton packs more saltiness (and mass) per unit volume.

None of which has anything to do with the weaknesses in the first draft of the recipe. As you know I had a virus which killed a lot of my recipes and food notes, including nearly all of my barbecue stuff. So, I'm flying on memory. It's not a big problem with my cookiing because the stuff I want to do I've done enough that measurement is entirely by eye and by taste. With the pork rub, I know I've got enough salt and paprika by eye -- plus, I cut the basic rub with other spice combinations -- fennel/coriander for instance, or cocoa/cinnamon -- which takes down both the salt and sweet components. The basic rub has to work as a stand alone and a component and I underestimated the salt punch it carried.

No excuses, just sayin' is all.

For next time... swine rub is one of the few rubs which should taste pretty good on its own. Just stick a finger in there, give it a lick and adjust.

BDL
post #39 of 49
Looks good! As BDL said taste the rub, I did a chicken leg quarter tonight with Smokin' Guns mild and I can eat some of the rub straight from the bottle. Stuff is good on popcorn too!
post #40 of 49
Just an fyi I have a 9-pound boston butt going into the Weber Bullet tonight and the rub was applied about 3 days ago. So this will be my first smoke where the butt wasn't rubbed 6-24 hours in advance; the local butcher who sold me the rub recommended rubbing 2 or 3 days in advance of cooking in order to achieve an even better flavor throughout the meat.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #41 of 49
This worked out pretty well, thanks!


The spice rub was really a nice blend. Much better and much better rounded than most recipes or blends that I've been trying. If there's one thing I'm finding with BDL recipes is that they're well balanced. No, no...I would say fully balanced. There's more than just a homeostasis within the flavors, there's always a nice roundness or depth.

For my taste I usually stay clear of chili powder in most of my rubs. I just found them to be a bit too much (well) chili taste. But having a smaller amount really stretched the flavors out. I could see playing around with the recipe in a few other directions...but it's a better start than I've found in other places. I have made the mistake of using Morton's Kosher salt in a previous rub, which is why I don't use it as a equal substitution any more :mad: The rub...nice...good taste alone too.

This is the first time I've injected my shoulder (you didn't think...). I could see this being fun to play with some nice hints of flavors. I can't wait to throw a little bit of peach into the mix (just seems like a natural). I didn't end up going thru much of the injection liquid...oh well.

I really don't like the whole "don't peek" thing. I like to peek...I would mop at times in the past. It's just sooo purty to look at while it's cookin'! But...I put the water pan in their and kept the lid closed the whole time. Took the pork out at 193f and let it come up to 198f. It turned out a very nice, super juicy, well broken down pull. Still, I make no promises if I could leave the lid closed the entire time on the next piece of meat that I smoke.

I put the mustard sauce together and tried a bit. I ended up adjusting to reduce the vinegar down a little. I ended up with a sauce that still had a vinegar forefront...but just not so much. It went well with the fattier meat of the shoulder.

All in all...very good advice and I can't wait to start playin' around a bit. Thanks!


I'm still not sure which KCBS event I'll end up going to but I'll certainly look to see if I can make the JD event. With 3 kids under six years of age I'm not looking to compete (although I bet it would be fun). But I am hoping to get into one of the judging "courses". Much like this recipe, I'm hoping to gain some insight into where a well made (decent scoring) BBQ consist of. I have no problem branching out to meet personal preferences. But I believe in proper calibration too ;)


Thanks,
dan
post #42 of 49
Thread Starter 
Dan,

Sounds like it really worked for you. And yes, now that you've got it going we can start talking about the peach/ginger/maple combination -- you'll like it. I wanted you to have a chance at something mainstream before moving on to the exotic.

The type of recipe you used (after RPM tweaked it) is the sort which scores in kcbs comps. The judges appreciate excellence, but aren't real thrilled with originality. It's very much "in the box," but you'll be surprised at how good in the box can be when the ingredients are top notch and so is fire management.

I just wish I had this thing together as well for RPM as it came to you. But, oh well.

BDL
post #43 of 49
Hi BDL,

I just can't stop thinking about the maple flavor with the peach/ginger combination. I'd love to read any thoughts that your willing to share.

thanks,
dan
post #44 of 49
If I could please recommend a couple of great barbecue websites that you would find helpful, here they are:

1. The Virtual Weber Bullet

2. The Smoke Ring

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #45 of 49
As far as the water pan is concerned, it's just a heat sink that prevents wide swings in temperature. In my Weber Smokey Mountain smoker, I use instead a foil-covered terra cotta saucer (flat plate on bottom of potting vases) that is placed on top of the foiled water pan.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #46 of 49
Thread Starter 
Actually, you use the saucer as a "(heat) ballast," or "heat bank," and as a shield against direct radiance; but not as a "heat sink," which is something else. The idea is to keep a more or less steady temperature going in the cooking chamber despite variation in the in the fire pan; plus to ensure that the vast majority of energy in the cooking chamber is convected rather than radiant. Some popular alternatives to the terra cotta are fire bricks or sand. Many people use terra cotta shards from broken pots as a sort of "split the diff" between clay and sand.

The thing about using dry ballasts in the WSM (like kokopuff's) is that the WSM is incredibly tight as bullets go. The biggest advantage with dry ballasts is the flexibility they allow with temperature. Water in the pan really tends to keep it down because of how much energy it absorbs for phase change.

But none of those are good for RPM. He should use water or water plus aromatics (wine, beer, herbs in the water, etc.) in his ECB's pan because the ECB is so darn drafty compared to a WSM. A dry ECB is an unhappy ECB. :cry: (Not to digress or anything like that, but you only get a little flavor out of aromatics in the waterpan; what you mostly get is a great smelling backyard. Nothing wrong with that.)

Humid air doesn't strip as much moisture from the meat, and transfers energy more efficiently than dry (in effect "tuning" the pit and promoting even cooking). A WSM is tight enough that it keeps the same humid air circulating for long periods of time, introducing very little fresh, dry air. One measure, other than it's cooking, is its relative fuel efficiency. I.e., it's not pulling in a lot of air to burn a lot of charcoal, because it doesn't use a lot of charcoal. On the other hand, charcoal fired ECBs use a LOT of fuel because they're (wait for it) so drafty, lose a lot of heat, and need to replace it. This means they circulate dry air, unless it's humidified.

Getting back to WSMs. They are near ideal cookers and I recommend them highly to anyone who's interested in a smoker, portable, or all 'round -- especially if value is a consideration. However, they are practically sui generis when it comes to fire and air management. Many techniques which work well with them don't work at all for other bullets and vice versa.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #47 of 49
For a 12-18 smoke on the WSM, around half a bag of Kingsford charcoal (NOT MATCH LIGHT) is used.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #48 of 49

I am so hungry now. 

post #49 of 49
Thread Starter 

Frankenthread!  It's alive!  It's alive!

 

BDL

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