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Food Safety Question

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello All;
I am making herbed turkey breast in the crock pot for tomorrow. This required me to marinate the turkey overnight (In the refrigerator) and then cook it tomorrow morning.

Today, I bought two 3LB Turkey Breasts. One was fine and the other was wrapped in two packages. The inner package had some red juice (Blood?) in it. I am wondering if this is safe to prepare or if it poses a risk of food poisoning due to the red juice ? I did wash that second breast off with warm water before placing it in the marinade. FYI - For safety, I don't plan on reusing the marinade.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Tim
post #2 of 6
Harf to answer, but lets start.
1. Were they both same brand?
2.Were they thawed when you purchased them?
3 Were they dated?
4. When you opened was there any smell or other sign of it being bad?

The red liquid is blood mixed with water which when thawed all turkeys and chickens throw off.
Always throw away marinades after use.
Try and always make sure product is under or submerged in marinade.
Chances are your breast are ok. make sure when you cook the internal temp. of breast reaches 165-170(dont guess, use thermometer.)
And please dont wash or rinse poultry with warm or hot water. since bacteria is killed only at hi temps and by washing warm you put temp into risk zone why do it. Use cold running water.:D
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the response, Ed;

Yes they were the same brand
Not sure if they were thawed. They were definitely not frozen They were in the refrigerated section.
Yes they were dated.
And no ... they did not smell bad or have any signs of being bad or I would have returned it to the store immediately.

The recipe said to boil marinade for 1 minute but I never trust that so I just make two batches, 1 to marinade in, and the other to add during cooking.

Thanks for the info. on using cold vs. hot water to rinse. I used warm (not hot) water but from now on, I'll only have to remember to rinse in cold running water.

And finally, I always check the internal temperature of turkey when I roast in the oven but probably wouldn't have done that in the crock pot. However, since you mentioned it, I'll be sure to do so.

Tim
post #4 of 6
It is a common misconception that the red juice that comes out of meat is blood. It is NOT blood -- the blood was drained out of the veins and arteries immediately after slaughter. There might be a small amount still in the veins at the joints, but not much. That red liquid is dissolved myoglobin, the protein substance that gives meat its red color. In turkey breast, it doesn't appear red in the meat itself (other than as a faint pink blush), but once it leaches out and mixes with oxygen, it turns red.

That there was a great quantity in the bag may indicate that the turkey breast had been frozen and thawed, as Ed B suggested. But other than possible lack of full disclosure, there's nothing much wrong. Meat that has lost a lot of juice has, well, lost a lot of juice and may cook up drier. Slow cooking at low temperature can make that less of a problem.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 6
It may also be added that any meat or poultry packaged for supermarket. The longer the product sits in the case the more liquid it will throw into the package. This also makes the product go bad faster, by sitting in this. This is one reason the packers started putting a blotter in the bottem of all protein packages.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 6
I have always wondered they the blotter was in packages of meat. Now I know! Thanks!
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