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Chicken fat, shucks

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So I purchase a whole chicken the other day, spatchcock it, throw it on the grill, had a great dinner yesterday. The backbone, tail, wing tips, etc. went into a stockpot. This particular bird was bit fattier than usual, I skimmed off about half a cup of fat off the broth after cooling it down.

Now what? How shall I best dispose of this residue?

mjb.


ps: I will be using some of it in a roux based sauce for tonight's leftovers,
looking for some other inspirations.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #2 of 9
Fried potatoes, use it to replace some of the fat in biscuits/dumplings, make salad croutons, etc
post #3 of 9
Use as a sub for butter in recipes and even to just spread on bread.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 9
Make chopped chicken liver(schmaltz)
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #5 of 9
Pan-Fried potatoes and biscuits. Jewish chopped chicken liver.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 9
Yeah, chicken fat goes real well with potatoes. One of those matches made in heaven.
post #7 of 9
As you can see, we all pretty much agree: DON'T THROW IT OUT! :D (I'm having deja vu here, eh, kuan? didn't we talk about this a couple of years ago? :lol: When that poster said something like "dispose of," he didn't mean "throw out" as we presume you also don't. ;))

I almost always save the fat that rises to the top of stock. After I skim it off, I usually clarify it -- simmer until the bubbling stops -- to get out the extra water and thoroughly cook anything in it that might go bad in storage. Since it cooks at a low temperature (just at or below boiling), the smoke point doesn't seem to be affected. Then I use it when I want to add that flavor to whatever I'm cooking.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
One thing I did with the chicken fat was as Mary B. suggested, salad croutons. A week or so ago I got lazy and bought a bag of prefab "caesar" salad at the market. Once I doctored it up a bit, it was edible, but....

So to atone for my sin the other night I make a real salad, some chunks of the chicken, bits of ham, etc. It was the croutons that stole the show. If you have never made them yourself, make it a point to do so in the near future. It is a really simple process, but can take a few minutes. The gist of it is that you take small bits of bread and fry it in oil until it is brown and crispy.

The details, though, can make a difference. I seem to recall that a while back BDL talked about making croutons in his rendition of classic caesar salad. The first detail is tearing the bread, not cubing it with a knife. If the bread is too fresh, tearing it produces little doughy balls - tasty in their own way, but not what you want here.

So you get a cup or so of oddly shaped, randomly sized bits of sort of stale bread. Heat two or three tablespoons of fat in a skillet. What sort of fat? Well, for the batch I did the other day it was the chicken fat. You may want to use a light olive oil, perhaps butter. You may want to use bacon drippings. Or maybe some of the fat that came to the top of that beef stock you were making with those roasted rib bones. I once made a batch using the oil from a can of anchovies - I loved it, my wife was not impressed.

However you cook and season them, homemade croutons are worth a bit of extra time to make.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #9 of 9
Get a dog...............
Michael
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Michael
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