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Cheerios and the FDA

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Just incase anyone hasnt heard here is a link to the article surrounding the "controversial" wording and claims by General Mills, which happens to be 100% proven thru multiple studies.

General Mills, Inc., Warning Letter

Just another way for the govt to keep its preverbial heel on the throat of healthy living and eating Americans
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #2 of 19
O dear god... thats possibly the dumbest thing I have ever seen.
post #3 of 19
I agree
Instead of going after General Mills for advertising, why dont they send inspectors into the meat , chicken and peanut butter factories and plants to check and do actual food inspections and inform the public before the fact and not after. I know of 1 meat fab. plant that has not been inspected in 2 years by a live inspector. This is not acceptable in this day and age. They just keep spitting out new laws , but dont enforce them. I believe that anyone who gets sick through E-colli, salmonella, botulism should not only sue the manufacturer or purveyor, but should also name the FDA and USDA in the suit for gross negligence, I know I would.:eek:
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post #4 of 19
yeah, we really need protection from the idea that Cheerios may be seen as a drug due to the wording on the box. Lord knows i might have been wandering the wrong aisle looking for my cholestorol medication/breakfast cereal:rolleyes:
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #5 of 19
It looks like the FDA is trying to draw attention away from the rest of the failures in food inspection at the expense of the American public. Cheerios are made from whole grain and everyone knows its good for you, instead lets make them bad so the public eats more tainted meat/produce/peanut butter... oh and don't forget eating more fast food that's loaded with fat and salt. Someone has their priorities wrong and needs to be fired.
post #6 of 19
My kids like Cheerios and I'm glad they do. Should they eat Captain Crunch instead?

I can understand the control of false claims for stuff that is made to appear as a drug. But this is a food item, not a supplement or drug. Cheerios is hyping it up, ok, but it's based on fact.

There are a lot better things the FDA could be doing.
post #7 of 19
Does anyone actually have a link to a scientific study or studies that support General Mills claims? I googled for an hour and could not find one, not even on the Cheerios website.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Because it was conducted, submitted to and approved by the FDA about 3 years ago you can request a copy from the FDA via the freedom of information act.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #9 of 19
But WHERE is the study? All I've seen are claims that a study was done. Was it published in a medical journal? Food industry publication? If it's valid, why doesn't GM have it displayed prominently on their website? Why doesn't it seem to be on the internet anywhere? Who funded the study? Did they enroll enough subjects to be statistically signficant? What were the results for the control group? How much of the decrease in cholesterol can be attributed to a low fat diet and not the Cheerios? What about LDL and HDL? How many servings of Cheerios did the subjects eat per day (I've seen 3 servings mentioned)? All I'm asking for is the information that should be contained in this study.

General Mills made the claim that its cereal treats a medical problem...they'd better be able to back that up with medical data. The issue is that there are now thousands of foods, herbal supplements, and other things on the market that claim to prevent or cure diseases without any proof whatsoever. Plenty of people get sucked in by this nonsense, waste their money, and forgo legitimate treatments because they think they can treat their high cholesterol, heart disease, cancer, etc by eating some new & improved food and taking the newest miracle supplement. The FDA has very specific requirements for the labeling of substances claiming to treat disease. If we didn't have charlatans out there trying to make a buck with phony claims, then the FDA wouldn't have to waste tax dollars policing them.
post #10 of 19
Google up American Dietetic Association soluble fiber cholesterol

or start with this: New Studies Find Soluble Fiber in Oatmeal Improves Health
post #11 of 19
I don't see this as a phony claim. They are not claiming that Cheerios will cure heart disease, and they put qualifiers on it. I agree that they are hyping it up, but it's not false info. They are not selling rhino horns as a cure-all.
post #12 of 19
Years ago there was a study on toothpast, where one brand claimed 50% less cavities. The study was in house and challeged. The company proved there was indeed 50% less. Two out of the four persons tested(employees) had less cavities!!~!??
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post #13 of 19
The Mayo clinic makes the claim too.

Cholesterol: The top five foods to lower your numbers - MayoClinic.com

The FDA's issue is with the way it's worded.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks Kuan, If everyone would have read the enitre letter then they would have seen that there was no challenge to the claim, only the way the claim was made.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #15 of 19
This is sort of off-topic, but I've been reading on this in the news and around the web, and it looks like many of the FDA officers -- not the chiefs, but the people who actually do the work -- have been begging for resources to do precisely what you're asking. They've had their funding cut again and again and again. Big meat and poultry and whatnot companies have fought against oversight, and they've won time and again. The FDA's inspection arm has been cut to the bone. Apparently the Obama administration would like to do something about this, and is working on it, but it does take money and that's not easy to come by right now. The FDA hasn't nearly enough staff to do the work, they can't afford to hire out enough, and thus what little they can do is often confined to things like reading box labels, which is cheaper.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Just so you guys know,the FDA has nothing to do with the Meat and Poultry business, that is handled by the USDA and they are required to have an inspector on staff in every processing facility.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #17 of 19
Quite right, sorry. Mind wandering. I meant USDA. Which I suppose annuls my whole point connecting it to Cheerios....
post #18 of 19
KCZ here is link that actually tells who did the study and the results as presented by General Mills.

Cheerios(R) Can Help Reduce Cholesterol 10 Percent in... ( Clinical Study Results P...)
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #19 of 19
Only if they ship interstate, we had one years ago who used to come in at any old time, go for martinis at noon and come back at 2.30 leave for the day at 4.30.
"What a way to run a business'':crazy:


PS .This went on for years.
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