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LARD is back baby!!! (link)

post #1 of 10
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I found this article today. Granted, it supports my biased view on fats, but I have always leaned toward animal based fats since that is what I grew up with. And yes, yes, I know....all fats are bad to some extent. But I will bask in this lard victory....however short it is (i.e. until the next study gets published.):smiles:

Lard: After decades of trying, its moment is finally here. - By Regina Schrambling - Slate Magazine
post #2 of 10
Ben- Very interesting. Thanks for the post.

I remember when I lived in New Mexico the local supermarkets had two or three shelves of lard in every variety and size. It has become uncouth to use lard to the point where you might only find one lb. on the shelves any more.

Of course duck fat has not gone out of style!
Michael
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Michael
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post #3 of 10
While we're on the subject, this article, like most things I've seen, suggests rendering fat by cooking over a very slow fire. Some do it in an oven, some in a cast-iron pot, whatever. Then you save the cracklings.

In Chinese cooking, however, you usually steam the fat. You cut it as fine as you can, put it in a heatproof bowl, cover tightly, and set in a steamer for a long time. Then you strain it and refrigerate. Some water remains at the bottom, and you pour that off. Everything else is a very pure white rendered fat.

Now the thing is, these taste different. Steamed fat has almost no taste whatever: it's like a neutral oil. Pan-rendered fat, which is usually at least pale gold-color, has a distinctive pork flavor. If I had both available and wanted to make sweet pie crust or something, I'd use steamed, and I'd use the golden kind for savories.

My question: does anyone know if there are differences in properties between these two lards? Has anyone used both and might compare them directly?
post #4 of 10
Thats good news.
post #5 of 10
I overheard a mexican restauranteur state that as far as frijoles (refried beans) are concerned, nothing, absolutely nothing substitutes for lard as an ingredient. I've also hears englishmen claim that their fish (as in fish and chips) cooks much better when lard is used as a frying medium.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #6 of 10
According to that article, I must be the healthiest, most "fueled" person I know. ...my wife was giving me that sideways look when I sauteed up some asparagus in bacon fat for dinner ( I keep a tub in the freezer)-this'll show her!

on a side note, I've had a hard time finding a "Larding Needle" in the US -anyone know where I can find one?

EDIT: found one!
Wusthof 4380 Larding Needle 8"
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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post #7 of 10
when breaking down a 300# pig, the leaf lard is separated for biscuit/pastry use.....we cut it into small pieces and render slow/low on the stove, sieve through cheesecloth then chill and scoop into useable amounts then freeze for future use.

The back fat or belly fat is rendered for frying.....chicken fried in lard is crispy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside. NOTHING compares to fried in lard.

leaf lard does not have a piggy flavor, the back fat has a slight pork taste.
Somewhere in the photo archives is a picture of !/2 a 400# tammworth sow with a solid 4-5" fat layer from the spine to the belly.....what a fun pig to work with......

Commercial lard is different than lard you render. I don't add shelf stable chemicals.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 10
Try looking at FANTES.COM for a larding needle.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #9 of 10
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #10 of 10
cool.....there is also a photo album of 14 pics breaking down piggies with my buddy in the photo gallery, we cryovaced leaf lard & it's in one photo.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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