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bored with this cut of beef- help please

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
hey gang, I have been hooked up with the local food bank since losing my job back in march. While I am grateful for the free food, I do have an issue. I was given a case of beef called a Beef Cross Cut Hind Shank or en espanol Chamorro de Res Cortado.

this is a bone in cut and is tougher then all get out unless I braise it for hours. I turn it into something like a chuck roast, usually with some lentil or potatoes. However I am getting bored with my recipe. Anyone got any input..really... anything.:crazy:
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post #2 of 15
Well, what's your usual recipe? What liquid, what vegs, what spicing? If you change one or two of those, you'll have a whole new dish.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 15
Have you tried to do a dry rub like a Texas style Brisket and cook it low and slow in an oven? I would suggest to season wrap in foil and bake at maybe 275-300 for 3-4 hours depending upon the weight. Shred it and serve it with some BBQ sauce, beans, slaw and corn for a BBQ or even shredded as sandwiches.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #4 of 15
You might try, just as an experiment, searing it very hot on a grill until brown, then letting it finish cooking on the grill's cool side (bank the coals to get two sides), for about 15 minutes. Surprisingly, a number of tough bone-in cuts turn into Neanderthal munchies when cooked this way.
post #5 of 15
Off the top of my head,
Season it with a touch of fennel seed, nutmeg and cinnamon, sear and braise it until it falls off the shank. reduce the braising liquid to a glace, shred the meat and combine with the glace and balance with salt. let this chill, stuff some ravioli with the mixture. -Toss with some fresh parsley (Italian of course) and a horseradish creme fresh. yum.
-or, Cherries are just coming into season, split and pit some cherries, saute with a touch of Chianti, mount with butter and toss with toasted pine nuts, and sprinkle with a little tarragon.

Maybe confit the shank and toss it with some spring greens and crumbled chevre?
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
mm..my typical recipe involves a little worstechire, onion ,thyme, rosemary, garlic , salt pepper, dash olive oil

have also done it with a salt pepper , mae ploy and sriracha, with some dried red chiles, garlic and ginger


sigh, guess it doesn't matter, no matter what it has to be cooked down to the same basic texture. maybe i just need to turn it into enchiladas or some taquitos to get a little more texture difference.

* could try the grill I guess, but the fat and connective tissue tend to get really hard when heated too fast. was thinking of taking the time to modify my weber in a 50 gallon drum to make a smoker and try that. a confit....hmmmm....may have to try that too.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #7 of 15
I'm not familiar with this cut, but would it make a good ground beef perhaps?

Or try brining?

Or a 48 hour marinade in red wine, bay leaves, veg. oil, pepper, then long slow cooked. If you have access to a slow cooker, even better.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 15
make cakes out of the braising meat, bread it and fry it like a crepinette.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #9 of 15
Simmer with lots of chili powder, mexican oregano, cumin, S&P then shred. Use for tacos, chimichangas, etc. Save the braising liquid for chili starter after you reduce it.
post #10 of 15
All shanks from any animals are going to be tough. It is mostly uses for chopped meat. It cant be dry cooked, or grilled it must be braised and for a long period of time. If you bone it out it could be used for a good goulash or stew.Basicaly it is the lower part of the rear leg or the cut above the hoof, and is subject to a lot of exercise by the animal therefore tough.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #11 of 15
I still suggest the grill experiment. As shown in this blog entry, it works with short ribs, for example, contrary to what almost everyone will tell you. You've got lots, apparently, so what have you got to lose?
post #12 of 15
Try this. Just substitute your tough cut of beef for the sirloin tip in the following recipe.

Delta Doc's Garlic Beef

Ingredients:
1/2 cup Kikkoman regular soy sauce
1/4 cup olive oil
2 whole bulbs garlic - each clove quartered and/or halved
1 onion, chopped
10 ounces beer
1 teaspoon each salt and pepper
1-1/2 cups beef stock
3-4 lb. whole sirloin tip roast

Preparation:

In crockpot (off), place soy sauce, olive oil, and garlic. Soak overnight.

In the morning, add the chopped onion, beer, salt and pepper, beef stock, and the whole roast.

Turn crockpot to LOW with vent closed (if your pot has a vent) and simmer for 8 to 10 hours until it falls apart. Serve on hard rolls (preferably rye or pumpernickel).
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
thanks gang. I appreciate all the input. I will be eating this stuff for a while, so am most happy to give this all a try.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #14 of 15
if you plan on doing it in some asian style, i would reccomend adding pineapple juice to the marinade, as enzymes present in the pineapple juice will help break down the muscle fibers, making the cut a whole lot more tender before it even hits the grill.
post #15 of 15
I,atm,actually slow cooking same cut of meat you are speaking of.....marinaded I a lil cab wine and adobe and wow, what an aroma!
I think whatever not used for halftime sliders today will make an excellent stew and/or fabulous beef broth base! have
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