or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bitter Foods

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
In a society where we are trained to seek sweet and/or salty foods, what place do other flavors hold in our diet? "Bitter" foods are generally avoided or prepared in a way to counter their bitterness with sugar. I think there is a great benefit to learning how to enjoy bitter foods in their natural state. How do you enjoy yours?

Amongst what I love:
Dandelion greens - boiled, drained, and served with a pinch of salt, a drizzle of evoo, and a squirt of lemon.

Escarole, endive - added to soups, or eaten as a salad with balsamic vinegraitte

Frisee - salad ( usually with lardons, croutons, and a creamy vinegraitte)

Broccoli rabe - Boiled, drained, and then sauteed in garlic and olive oil, sometimes with pasta.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #2 of 17
I love arugula (does that count?), in sandwhiches, salads, etc.
post #3 of 17
Interesting point!

I can't think of many specific bitter foods besides greens -- and I too love bitter greens of all sorts. There are some spices that give a slight bitter edge, too. Some of those digestives, like Fernet Branca and Jagermeister. And then there's . . . COFFEE, esp. espresso. :lips:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #4 of 17
dandilion greens as a salad
rape with pasta/romano/garlic/chili flakes/chicken stock
artichoke....recently I've been trimming, cutting in half, scooping out thistle, thin slice and saute....often adding to a leek, fingerling potato medley.
escarole....balsamic/evo/raisins/pinenut saute number

not into frisee.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
To my palate arugula is more peppery and on the mild side of bitter. But I can imagine that if my taste for bitter wasn't more developed that I would consider this a bitter green. Interesting.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 17
east indian bitter melon: karela/caraili

i dont know how people eat this, and the preparations always look so appealing

but it is supposed to be very healthy

and i guess after forcing yourself to eat it a lot, you start to to like it




Fry Caraili (Karela) | Simply Trini Cooking


Kalounji (Stuffed Caraili / Karela) | Simply Trini Cooking

post #7 of 17
Do cocktails count?
I am in LOVE with Amaro, basically refers to drinkable types of bitters. When ever I imagine a refreshing beverage, I immediately think of that slightly bitter, herbal depthyness of some variation of an Amaro cocktail.

Try this cocktail, I served it at one of my private dinners:

The Sardinian
Muddle 2 wedges of orange and one wedge of lemon in a shaker with a tsp of raw sugar and a cup of ice,

add 2 oz of Amaro Montenegro

shake briefly, and pour into a rocks glass

top it off with a little Prosecco

bask in the sun, and repeat until complete loss of motor skills is achieved.
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Of course beverages count. I myself love unsweeted iced tea and drink my coffee without sugar or sweetener.

I must look into this bitter melon recipe, any idea where to get it? I myself do not like bitter melon but my husband goes gaga for the stuff.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #9 of 17
does sauerkraut count as a bitter or tangy? Either way I love it.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
I think it qualifies as tangy. But tangy is another flavor profile, more accepted and craved than bitter, but for some really hard to swallow.

I can't do tangy. I'm trying though. I'm eating yogurt every morning with blueberries like it's medicine because I crave more sweetness to balance out the tanginess. I know that I'll eventually get used to it though.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #11 of 17
u can get them at an indian grocery store. (or philipino, and sometimes west indian)

yeah it really is bitter. its not like slightly bitter, even after being soaked in salted water and squeezed. it is a fine example of the "bitter flavor"

i also have a curry recipe and another fried recipe that calls for sauteing with onion, garlic and nigella...

u can also stuff with seasoned beef, mango kuchela, cheese, dal, shredded chicken.

they will be called karela or carili or something like that at indian or west indian places


i will get some soon, i want to grow to enjoy it...
post #12 of 17
not sure where sorrel would fall, but it is one of my favorites....never makes it home from the farmers' markets.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #13 of 17
I've always found it funny that bitter foods are such a hard sell when coffee is so popular in this country. Granted, US coffee is pretty mild compared to what the rest of world often drinks, but it still has a decent amount of bitterness to it.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #14 of 17
Boy oh boy! I really like bitter flavors. Coffee, broccoli , unsweetened tea, bitter greens, good chocolate. I've seen bitter melon in the stores before but I haven't tried it yet. I'll have to pick some up next time I go shopping.

I love grapefruit too. Eating grapefruit is a bit of an odd thing. It's almost as if I crave it the same way a person will crave sugar when their sugars run low. :lips:

On the subject of grapefruit...

I prefer to leave my bitter as is. But if you want to tone it down try some salt. To me, salt makes bitter flavors much sweeter than adding sugar to them.


dan
post #15 of 17
Hmmm...

Your post got me thinking. If adding salt can tone down the "bitter" and sometimes sweeten things up. Could diabetics add a little salt to their coffee instead of sugar?


I'll have to try it. Although I do dislike sweet coffee. I dislike sweet tea too, unless it's sweetened from honey. I actually don't like super sweet things...

Sweet is a bit odd for me. I'm not really crazy about things that are overly sweet, or only sweet. Yet I like bitter chocolate, honey and real maple syrup. To my wife, she dislikes how sweet real maple syrup is. But to me it isn't that sweet, it's the bitter I like in maple syrup. She doesn't like bitter at all.

huh,
dan
post #16 of 17
great! that sounds good with the grapefruit, i dont like it with sugar either.

grapefruit is so healthy and refreshing. a breakfast that really puts you in the zone (along with some nuts like almonds) and makes u consider giving up meats and wheat and all that other stuff.

such clarity and vibrancy from simple natural unprocessed food.
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
I would describe grapefruit as tangy, not bitter.

Broccoli is bitter??? It tastes sweet to me.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking