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guests from Tel Aviv, recipes for their food - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Kosher doesn't just mean the absence of pork, shellfish and other treif cuts. It's a lot more complicated and detailed than that.

For one thing, kosher food has to start kosher -- which in the case of meat means that it's been appropriately slaughtered and handled under rabbinical supervision.

For another, and more to the point, every surface the food touches must be kosher -- or the food, whether meat, dairy or pareve, becomes treif, i.e., no longer kosher. Asd a practical matter that means kosher food cannot be cooked outside a kosher kitchen -- at least not with a working knowledge of what is and isn't allowable.

The requirements of people who actually keep kosher versus the requirements of people who keep a sort of mime a casual kosher-lite (which, BTW, I'm not mocking) are extremely different. That's why I suggested asking.

Turkey ham or turkey bacon would probably be the among the closest and least obnoxious substitutes. But you'd have to something about the lack of fat.

Something about all of this reminds me of rumaki. Where's the Navy Grog?

BDL
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post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 
well the thing with this is, the Angels on Wings I mean, is that I'm not even thinking Kosher. That's not my point, I was just thinking of making things I know I like and know how to make, having nothing to do with what they can eat or should eat. It's not been even suggested that anyone has issues with certain kinds of foods. It'd be nice to serve what I'd ordinarily make and hope they like it, or.............................not, that' okay too.

PS.I wouldn't divvy from this recipe anyway it's too good the way it is.
I'd opt for something else if that was the case
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post #33 of 39
Pretty healthy outlook.

BDL
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post #34 of 39
The requirements of people who actually keep kosher versus the requirements of people who keep a sort of mime a casual kosher-lite (which, BTW, I'm not mocking) are extremely different. That's why I suggested asking.

BDL you are right. It should also be brought out that there is more then one degree of the relegion. Reformed, conservative and orthodox. Each one has their own outlook. In NY I did some parties so Reformed that if I did not serve shrimp the Bar Mitzvah wasnt a success. Others every food I handled was scrutinized by the OU. and a source letter had to be furnished. You can cook in an oven that is not truly kosher if you put a metal box inside and put the product to be cooked on a tray in it. . Non kosher pots as you know can be made kosher again by a rabbi boiling stones from the earth in it. There are so many laws of the Kashruth and each rabbi has his own interpretations
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post #35 of 39
Ed, I had to laugh at your description of Reform's outlook on kosher laws. (I'm Reform myself.) We don't require kosher in our synagogue, but draw the line to exclude pork, shellfish and dishes that combine meat and diary. At off-site parties, anything goes- so long as those who observe those restrictions have choices. The local variants are legion. I remember how alarmed I felt when I went to a bar mitzvah early in my experience with our current temple in the Milwaukee suburbs. The mom of the bar mitzvah boy wasn't Jewish (bless her for working so hard to see that her son was educated). The hotel catering office seemed not to have any experience with the rules or our local variants either, so they garnished most of the food platters with crayfish. Yow!

Suzanne, (Post #30) I'm not sure there's a better substitute for prosciutto than what you recommended, unless it's beef 'bacon'. That has the chewier texture more like pork/prosciutto than like turkey. Most of the turkey bacon I've eaten has had the texture of deli meat rather than of the chewier pork and beef versions.

If I can't find a suitable substitute, I don't use a poor one.
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post #36 of 39
Thread Starter 
I'm starting to think I'll back out of this and offer to help someone else out in their home for another portion of the meal. Since this was a lottery draw, most didn't get picked. I'm close to offering up my slot, as I originally thought, the best coarse to choose. I'm feeling more and more ill equipped.
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post #37 of 39
This thread made me crave hummus tahini. I made some tonight and it came out good. I used canned garbanzo beans, juice of lemon and lime, tahini, salt, olive oil and garlic. I grated the garlic fine and warmed it up in olive oil before mixing it in. I had it with Ak-Mak crackers. Yum :lips: My kids loved it too.
post #38 of 39
Most hotels and caterers unless in a large city area dont know the slightest thing about the Kashruth. I worked for a Kosher Caterer once in Florida he came into the hotel to do a gig. He had all his own food, and he used to hire us to put it out. He had cooked corned beef and wanted it sliced, I asked him if he had one of his knives, He told me use my slicer. I looked at him like he was crazy and said, but I cut every thing on this, He said thats alright its cold. I said to him look Im from NY dont BS me. A lot of people think the Rabbi comes in and blesses everything, they dont have a clue. And your right turkey bacon is the worst, use pastrami better, at least looks like it and taste 100% better.:D
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post #39 of 39
Thread Starter 
Hi Ed, not sure you read the last couple of my posts. < No intention of going with turkey or pastrami or anything else at this point.
Hi Oregon Yeti, I thank you for your hummus recipe. That was my original reason for even coming in here and posting, to get everyone's special hummus recipes along with post what my plans were. I'm now overwhelmed.
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