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How to store and what to do with liquid glucose

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I was wondering if anyone knew how to store liquid glucose.
My dad went out of town and bought me some liquid glucose so that I can make fondant for cakes. He bought two big buckets and they both expire in August!

Is there a way that I can preserve all of this glucose?
It's very hard to come across glucose, so I really don't want any of this going to waste.

...and another thing, does anyone know more things I could do with glucose other than fondant?
post #2 of 7
The main use of glucose syrup, candy making. It will prevent crystallization and make various candy making tasks easier. Glucose syrup can also be used in place or in conjunction with sugar to make various baked goods more moist.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 7
years ago, when i used to make celebration cakes for a living, I also made my own fondant icing which needs liquid glucose to keep it pliable.
I bought a massive 4 gallon tub and it kept for wel over a year Just keep it well sealed.
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #4 of 7
Keep tightly sealed in a cool place not extreme variances in temperature. It will keep over a year. Also when taking out of bucket pour only do not dip anything in to take out like a ladle as this will introduce possible contamination to the rest of it.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #5 of 7
Add it to homemade sorbets for a smooth scoopable texture without too much sweetness.

They can be sweet fruit sorbets for dessert, or more savory ones to serve as an intermezzo, or just because. For savory sorbets in particular, not needing to rely on straight sugar makes glucose really handy in preserving the savoriness while still giving a result that's smooth and easy to handle (no icyness).

Pat
post #6 of 7
Savoury sorbet sounds lovely. Never tried before. Any recipes?
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #7 of 7
Hmm. I don't have a recipe. I'm not being coy, I just make this stuff all the time based on available scrap, and since the ingredients and quantities vary, I eyeball the necessary glucose accordingly and taste and adjust the base for flavor and texture.

Here are the ingredients for a recent one, though you'll have to experiment if you intend to make a lot of it. I've never done batches bigger than one quart or liter, it's an amuse bouche.

cooked yellow beets
cucumber
muscat vinegar
tarragon
glucose (2 TBL, approximately)
salt
sugar (as flavor harmonizer, not as overt sweetner)
vegetable stock (just a little bit, to help blend)
good olive oil

Basically, blend the whole thing in a Vita Prep, taste and adjust (it should seem like a tasty pureed chilled soup, just this side of robust, in order to compensate for the dulling effect cold foods have on tastebuds), then pour into ice cream maker. Serve on chilled spoons, with a drizzle of chive oil.

Pat
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