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Serving Bruschetta

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Sorry, not a caterer, but I thought you could help.

Bruschetta for 300 as an appetizer: What's the best, or easiest way to serve. The tomato mixture and the toasted bread--Is it better to put the tomato stuff on the bread, or can you have a large platter with the toasted bread, and then a bowl with the tomato and let them fix their own?

This is part of several appetizers being served--cheese trays, etc.

Thanks,
H.
post #2 of 13
We served bruschetta for a wedding last summer.....100 guests.
toasted bread, mozzerella balls and tomato goo....guests made their own. Worked fine. Otherwise you fight the sog.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks shroomgirl, I knew you would come through.

I agree with you,nothing worse as soggy tomato goo (well, probably a lot of stuff worse).

The wedding is having a big catered dinner, but this transplanted New York family wanted some homemade family favorites. The mom's doing just the appetizers, including nearly 800 homemade meatballs and other stuff during the cocktail hour.

300 people for anything is very ambitious. Just takes a lot of planning, organization and money!

Thanks again.
post #4 of 13
What a great question. The worst thing that can happen with a popular item like this is that you would get a soggy bread with soft and mushy tomatoes for the filling. That would not be very well done at all. Here is how to combat that:


Properly toast your bread. This is one of the single most important steps here. If you follow nothing else, follow this piece of advice. You need to have that toasted layer on your bread vehicle for your tomato layer.


Use Italian roma tomatoes. They pack a lot of flavor, and they are meatier and dryer than their beefsteak cousins.


Seed the tomatoes. You want to get as much liquid out of your bruschetta mix as possible.


Season just before service. This is important, as salt will draw the liquid out of the tomatoes if it sits. The best way is to adjust the flavor with some salt crystals right before serving.


Build the bruschetta just as you are serving them. Now, this would be a pain in the butt, but you will ensure that your canapes are not wet and soggy. Try not to make them way in advance, or you will get a mushy surprise.


Follow that advice, and you should have less problems with your mix. The same goes for bruschetta with any type of mix, such as anchovies, artichokes, cheese and other fillings. The fundamentals remain the same.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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post #5 of 13
[QUOTE=henry;268789]Sorry, not a caterer, but I thought you could help.

Bruschetta for 300 as an appetizer: What's the best, or easiest way to serve. The tomato mixture and the toasted bread--Is it better to put the tomato stuff on the bread, or can you have a large platter with the toasted bread, and then a bowl with the tomato and let them fix their own?

You are trying to serve it like a dip, and it isnt.

Put your toasted bread on tray , put brushetta mixture in a good size pastry bag without a tube. Bag it out onto bread then top with some Reggiano and chopped parsley and serve. Dont do it way in advance, cause it will get soggy. You can lightly spray the bread with some good olive oil first and this helps with the soggy issue to. Remove the seeds from tomato also.:D
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post #6 of 13
one of the things we've done recently is a "bruschetta table"......various options to standard bruschetta....pesto, tapenade, caponata, tomatoes....etc

welldonechef, thank you for sharing details.....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #7 of 13
My pleasure. Glad to have helped.

One other thing: bruschetta means the bread, toasted. Feel free to have a platter of bruschetta breads, with various mixtures. Tomato/basil, black olive tapenade, sundried tomato tapenade, barlotti bean mixture, grilled artichokes and heart of palm.

The point is, your imagination should take off from here. Properly make the bread, and it can be a vehicle for whatever you want to put on it. I once made a bruschetta with ash goat cheese and candied baby heirloom carrots. The possibilities are endless!

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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post #8 of 13
Actually doing one of these for an event on Monday. Only doing two varieties though. Any chance you'd share your tapenade recipe? This one is a small cocktail party for 50 and I'll have six or seven other items.

Also, any pics of your setup? Will probably do the bread in a large wicker basket lined with white napkins, the tomatoes and tapenade in clear vessels of some sort. This event popped up at the last minute so I am formulating as I go along. Definitely won't be using the large martini glasses like I used to; I seem to break one at every event!

-Kevin
post #9 of 13
I thought that he was passing bruchetta and other hors d. If on a stationary table sure put it out like a taco or mexican station.:D
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post #10 of 13
ed most non-caterers do not have access to passing staff for 300 guests....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
As it turned out, the brushcetta turned out good. We piled the toasts on silver trays and served the tomato 'goo' in trifle bowls. Turned out well, as well as the rest of the catered food.

In a past life I worked in a high-end event venue where we passed lots of hors d'oeuvres. It was so much fun working with staff, owners and guests, doing behind the scene stuff. What was hard on me was the kitchen heat and my knees from standing and climbing stairs. I admire all you guys for all the hard work and the toll it takes on you.

Now I really enjoy reading all your stories.

thanks,
H.
post #12 of 13
Henri,

I am glad that your function worked out, and I am glad to have been of some small help.

Cheers,

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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post #13 of 13
Kevin....

I don't have a tapenade "recipe".....but here's the general outline....

rinse kalamata olives
garlic (I use Penzey's granulated or fresh, no other granulated)
brandy
parsley
thyme
sometimes anchovy
touch of dijon
extra virgin olive oil

Clear glass bowls, and a large lined basket work.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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