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What kind of fish works well for fish wellington?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
What kind of fish works well for fish wellington?

TIA
post #2 of 15
I've never heard of fish wellington. Assume you mean fish wrapped in a pastry dough?

If so, salmon would work well; as would any white, flaky fish.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 15
I've seen it done with salmon -- think coulibiac. You basically want a thick fillet that will not overcook in the time it takes to bake the pastry. (I would not parcook it the way you do the meat in Beef Wellington unless it were something really, really sturdy that takes a long time to cook.)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks! Ill try that, did you put crab inbetween fish and puff pastry? Any kind of sauce?

TIA
post #5 of 15
Any sort of white sauce would work with it. Personally I don't care for salmon & crab in combination, but a white fish and crab would work for me.

I have a recipe for a variation on that whole theme that might serve as a starting point for you:

Salmon & Rice in Pastry

1 recipe for pastry
1 lb fresh raw salmon, sliced
3 cups cooked rice, dry & cold
Salt & pepper to taste
2 cups veloute sauce
1 tbls chopped fresh dill
1 tbls lemon juice
3 hard cooked eggs, finely chopped
1 egg beaten with 1 tbls milk
1/4 lb unsalted butter, melted

Divide pastry in two parts. Roll out one half to a quarter inch thickness, place on sheet pan, and trim to a 7 x 17 inch rectangle.

Put a layer of rice 1/3" deep on the pastry, leaving a 1 1/2 inch border all arund. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spoon half the veloute sauce over the rice. Lay the salmon slices over the sauce to cover. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, dill, and lemon juice. Cover with balance of veloute sauce, then the choped eggs. Top with another 1/3 inch layer of rice. Pain the border of the pastry with the egg/milk wash.

Roll out the other half of the pastry to a quarter inch. Trim to a 9 x 16 inch rectangle and place over the loaf. Carefully press pastry around loaf without stretching it. Press edges together and trip to about an inch around the loaf. Press edges with tines of a fork.

Cut two small holes in top of loaf, about a half inch in diameter. Gather scraps of pastry together and cut out decorative shapes. Paint entire loaf with egg wash and stick on the decorations. Theen glaze them.

Put in a preheated 400F oven and immediately lower to 375F. Bake for 1 to 1 1/4 hours until pastry is golden brown.

Remove from oven and let stand 15 minutes. Pour 2 tablesoons melted butter into each hole in the top. Cut loaf into 1-inch slices and serve with remaining melted butter.

If you try this, let us know how it works out for you.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 15
We have used wild salmon and filet of sole. . usualy smear fish with dill flavored mayo and julianne of whites of leek. We cut the puff pastry with a fish cutter which is shaped like a fish. Then with the tip of teaspoon make scales like effect in the pastry . bake 400 on parchment paper about 20 minutes. Serve with a sauce either under or on the side.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 15
Personally, I would go with mackrell. Its fatty enough to stand up to baking. Wrap it in prosciutto and a little beschemel
-hmm, maybe a little truffle to mimic the richness of the liver in the original.
then cut your pastry dough out to look like a giant "goldfish" cracker!:lol:
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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nel maiale, tutto e buono!
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post #8 of 15
It could not be called fish wellington, it is "en croute" as in salmon en croute. You could cook it plain or add a filling to compliment the fish. Marscapone with chopped spinach and arugula would be nice or just a plain parsley sauce but make it a little thicker than usual so that you dont get soggy pastry.
post #9 of 15
Well caught & moved on....
Beef Wellington could be regarded as avant garde 'pate en croute', the meat pie, soo Fish Wellington seems like a stretch! :lol:
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #10 of 15
what as for what it can and can't be called, sure is a known commodity:

Fish Wellington.
Fish Wellington - All Recipes
salmon wellington recipe | fish recipes | salmon recipes
Salmon and Mushroom Wellington with Cucumber Sauce Recipe - MyRecipes.com
post #11 of 15
If I stuffed a chicken a with liver pate wrapped it with speck, par- roasted it then wrapped it in a lattice of flaky til golden & say... finished with a chunky apricot chicken jus & a few toasted pine nuts.... & it worked !!:suprise:
would I have to call it Chicken Wellington? ....or maybe Apricot Smoked Chicken en Croute... :smiles:
But I digress... Cod?
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #12 of 15
You can call it whatever you want, everyone else does I have seen it as "Boned breast of Capon Wellington. (if you name it this, you can charge $2.00 more)????:D :D
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CHEFED
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post #13 of 15
I have found that salmon works very well. Instead of a mushroom duxelle or pate, try making a scallop mousseline - puree some fresh scallops, a squeeze of lemon juice, add a bit of raw egg white and finally some cream and seasoning. Before coating the fish with the mousseline, make sure the fish is seared and cooled. Bon appetite!
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Good food is food that tastes of what it is!
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Kiwisizzler's blog

Good food is food that tastes of what it is!
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post #14 of 15
Ok so there are recipes online called fish wellington and I didn't mean to start a debate about it but it just sounds wrong to me, like an angler with a fish down his boot. Does this lend creedence to apple wellington? :lol:
post #15 of 15
What about a Wellington wellington? Might be a tad chewy tho.

Cod sounds good, or hake. Kiwisizzler's idea for the mouiselline sounds yummers.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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