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What is the best way to cook big game fish?

post #1 of 10
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What is the best way to cook big game fish?

I picked up a piece of wahoo, and a piece of amberjack today, marinaded them in 2 different marinades, and then grilled them, but they didn't really take on any of the marinade flavor.
post #2 of 10
What was the marinade and how long did you marinate them?

Well, it all depends on what type of fish you caught. While most of the larger fishes can handle just about any cooking method many of them lend themselves better to certain types of cooking over others. I would be more likely to saute grouper, while I would be more apt to grill swordfish, though you could do either to either fish. So I guess, what I am trying to say is that your question is too open ended to be answered properly.
post #3 of 10
If they are whole - how about the bake in salt method? Loads of sea salt, lightly sprinkled with water, some lemon and herbs of coice in the cavity, cover with more wetted salt, cook in moderate oven until done.

Should be lots of detailed recipes on Google. The salt forms a crust which you crack off and the skin should come with it. If not, make sure when you've lifted the fish out to serve, take the skin off as it is very salty.

Or, you could wrap in greased foil with fennel, lemon, sesame oil, S & P, dash of white wine, bake moderate until done. Slash the sides so it cooks evenly. You could also do this over charcoal on bbq, just make sure flames have died down first.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 10
As Pete notes, both of them lend themselves to just about any way of fishing.

Amberjack is probably the least preferred fish in America. There are various reasons why its taste and texture do not appeal to our collective tastebuds. Were it me, I'd bake it, after first making sure all the blood line and darker flesh is removed.

For fish like wahoo, I prefer making trussed steaks and broiling. I'd brush the steaks with a mixture of Dijon and white wine first.

Deboning the steaks and tying them can be a real PITA. But it's a much better way of cooking them.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 10
I agree. Amberjack here in Florida is the bottom of the barrel, it is good to make chum to catch other fish. A lot of cheap places try and pass it off as dolphin. As far as large fish, broiling or grilling I think best. Some of the filets of larger fish wont even fit into a saute pan in a whole state. I have just done some experimenting with marinades, and added green food color to see after a set time period if in fact the marinade penetrates the particular item and if so how deep. I can tell you it does'nt, In some fish and meats it goes in deeper towards center in others hardly enough to do anything. We used salt base which was great in chickens. we used acid bases which slightly tenderized all were different and produced different and varied results.:D
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 10
Looked at this 'cos I just came home to a metre long Kingfish in the laundry sink...second one this week...LOL Turns out they're a yellow-tail ambejack...who knew!
The southern hemisphere take is don't cook it....oily so sashimi or seared
Its a big fish, lived a while...let it stand a alone & let the sauce do the talkin' ;)
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #7 of 10
Wahoo or Ono as the Hawaiians call it is never cooked past medium because it dries out so quickly. As for Amberjack seared with a nice fresh herb crust and served with a simple citrus Beurre Blanc.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #8 of 10
My preferred way of preparing ahi tuna, assuming that's considered a big game fish, is marinating in a "teriyaki sauce" and then grilling it. In my experience I've had to make sure not to marinate it too long rather than the opposite. I'm talking about fish steaks about an inch (2.54 cm) thick, and I marinate them for no more than an hour and a half (3.14 kilometers).

I really need to experiment with Hawaiian ahi tuna poke since I love it and have never made it myself.
post #9 of 10
maybe an escabeche or escovitch as the jamaicans call it

spanish and french have good escabeches, i tihnk it comes from france, but im sure other western countries like greece or the netherlands have variations.... jamaica has a very tasty one (escovitch... i was introduced to this style through Jamaican food, i think they actualyl usuaslly use king fish, snapper, or wahoo!)

panama, puerto rico, cuba, peru, etc

philipines also has one.

they are always very tasty!
post #10 of 10
Wahoo is great grilled with just some good basting with olive oil and herbs.

Amberjack is okay as long as you do get that bloody lateral line out of it. There, make a sauce to go on it, preferably something with a good lemony flavor.

Amberjack are a great catch but better to release them. Keep the throw rod ready on the boat to nail the straggler dolphin on the way back in... grilled mahi is the best!!
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