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Why coat the rice in oil before cooking? - Page 2

post #31 of 38
I agree, that was what I was taught as well. Note that the process is pretty fast, so you can pretty much guarantee that the distinction between the two will come and go.

Jason Sandeman

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Jason Sandeman

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post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 
Great, thank you so much!
post #33 of 38
Well, I guess I am missing something :crazy:
post #34 of 38
Kuan, you have all three risotto rices in you pantry? wow.
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post #35 of 38
Caputo's Market rocks! Too bad it's 400 miles from here. :(
post #36 of 38
Yeah, I was impressed too...a quick look in the pantry...all of them! :cool:

LucH's explanation that Ed quoted seems to technically nail it shut & welldonechef pays appropriate cultural homage to what a risotto was created to be...

"When you are cooking your onion in the olive oil or butter, it is called "siffritto". Basically you are extracting the flavor from those items. Then you turn up the heat to "tostatura" the rice, or "toast" it. You add the warmed stock slowly, to extract some starch, stirring to evenly cook. This is the point where the risotto gets creamy. In the end, you "mantecatura" it, which means to "finish" with butter and parmesan."

But...no wine? :look:

I like that bit tho' I'm never sure if its the end of the frying & I'm deglazing and reducing for flavour & sweetness or the start of liquid & the wine should stay 'fresh'?

My instinct is to the former or shouldn't it be there classically?
"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
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post #37 of 38

"phatch" has it right. As it was explained to me very early on in my studies at the CIA (Culinary Institute of America)... "We do this to "crack" the hull of the grain, allowing for the realease of starches and the absorbtion of cooking liquids".

post #38 of 38

Hi there,

 

It was explained to me at Le Cordon Bleu as necessary to help prevent the rice, sticky and starchy by nature, from sticking together and forming an amorphous ball of goo, as well as layering additional flavor.  The "toasting" of the rice is done to help open it up with a bit of heat, so to speak, so that it absorbs the liquid and makes it easier to coax out the lovely starches. And the classical way to sweat the shallots is to use butter, although any fat, such as duck, goose or oil can be used.  I prefer butter.  

 

Now the interesting thing is arborio's outer layer contains the highest amount of starch out of all the other rice used in the risotto method, so it isn't entirely necessary to break or crack the rice as it is to toast it in order to release the starches, unlike what might be experienced with carnaroli or the vialone nano varieties.

 

Ok, hope that helps.   .         

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