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clafouti

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
ok, so i was looking through a dessert cookbook (Modern Classics book 2- donna hay) that i picked up at the library yesterday.

and in the "hot puddings" subset, is a clafouti with blood plums.

Now, i dont know exactly what a "blood plum" is, but i like plums alot, so i thought i'd give this one a shot.

my question is, what is the consistancy of a clafouti when its done? is it "pudding-y"? or is it solid? or what is it?

and if you have made one, what other fruits have you used? is it pretty safe to make with any stone fruit?
post #2 of 10
I like cherry and blueberry.
post #3 of 10
I like cherry, too.
post #4 of 10
denser than flan...less creamy....not really "american pudding like"....

Boozy cherries
Apples and currants (L'enotre's first pastry cookbook has a super recipe)
blueberries
Stone fruit
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 10
never tried this, but i've seen a prune and armagnac clafoutis made. A French classic. The prunes are stoned then soaked in armagnac for a few hours. lucky prunes eh? :smoking:

Like bread and butter pudding, everyone has their own preference for texture. Personal taste for clafoutis, plum. And i like the texture soft and squishy, like baked custard. to get it this way, i cut back on the flour a bit.

Most important for light and fluffy, is to mix it as little as possible. Too much handling makes it tough like a pancake
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #6 of 10
I like my clafoutis light and souffled so even less flour and more eggs.
post #7 of 10
The pictures i saw of it looked so appealing, with cherries, or with plums, so i tried it more than once, and the result was like having a thick pancake that's not quite baked through with some fruit cooked in it. Not at all appealing. There are so many wonderful deserts to make - i got the recipe from a couple of good sources, which had plenty of good recipes that came out well - so i'm thinking maybe it's clafouti that isn;t so great. But tell me if i'm wrong.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #8 of 10
As mentioned earlier, you really have to be light handed with clafoutis. overwork, and you get pancake
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #9 of 10

Since I recently posted a clafoutis question, I feel obligated to contribute my two cents. Try Bittersweet Pastry shop's clafoutis in Chicago. It's one of my favorites and it gives you something to aim for at home. I still have to try all the recipes that I got on the other thread and will report back when I have what I consider a "winner." I'm hopeful that my recipe from "First, Crack Your Egg" (a British TV show/cookbook for beginning cooks but with recipes from one of my all time fave chefs, Angela Hartnett) will be the winning recipe for me. Don't give up on clafoutis. The real thing, when done right, is sublime. But then I love custards of all kinds.

post #10 of 10

I LOVE Angela Hartnett. She really benefitted from being under the tutelage of Gordon Ramsay - and she is an AMAZING cook.

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