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Think fruit juice based syrup

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Just looking for some good techniques for making a fruit syrup that is nice and thick. We get a lot of grapes from our garden, and I would like to use the juice for some syrup. I've tried a recipe with a whole lot of sugar, and it was nice and thick, but the sugar taste was too strong for my liking. I've also tried thickening with corn starch or flour, but the syrup doesn't stay consistantly smooth. It'll get lumpy or have the flour collect at the bottom.

Any ideas?

Edit: corrected title (must have been tired when I wrote 'think' instead of 'thick' :crazy:)

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post #2 of 7
For immediate use, try using arrowroot as the thickening agent. It makes a smoother, shinier end product than other starches.

With any starch, btw, you can avoid lumps by first making a slurry. Combine the starch with an equal volume of cold liquid and whisk until smooth. Then add that to your main liquid, stirring as you do so.

For long term, just make a reduction. If your first go was too sweet, cut back on the sugar content. Your goal should be to concentrate the fruit flavor, so don't need nearly as much sugar as you'd use for, say, a simple sugar.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 7
Majority of fruit syrups today are thickened with corn syrup, Most fruit sauces are thickened with starches.
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post #4 of 7
Boil it down some more would be my first instinct.

And might smaller amounts of pectin work?
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
I tried boiling down the juice with about half the sugar I would usually use, and it worked out well. It was a bit sweet for my taste, so I'll probably use less next time, but the kids loved it. I made about 3 times what I used on the waffles last night, so I'll see how well it keeps.

I've never used arrowroot before. Any advice on how much to use if I go that route? I've also only used pectin for jelly so that could be an interesting experiment.

I love this forum, even if I mainly just lurk. Thanks for all the help and ideas!
post #6 of 7
Arrowroot and cornstarch have about the same thickening power. For sauces that generally means 1 tablespoon per cup of liquid.

I would try Ed's suggestion, though, for syrups, and use light corn syrup instead of a starch for that kind of fruit syrup. Boil down the juice to concentrate the flavors, then add the corn syrup to effect the viscosity you're looking for. Taste as you go, because it's easy to over-sweeten. Among the benefits to corn syrup is that your finished product will keep in the fridge without breaking down.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 7
KYHeirloomer is correct, cornstarch and arrowroot are used in the same ratios and dissolved in cold or room temp liquid. The only difference claimed is that arrowroot yields a better product, I disagree. arrowroot cost more. Pectin, guava gum, cellu. and other gel type items in a maple syrup may bind together, that's why its used in jellies:D
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