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Campfire Bread

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Bannock is the basic bread of the North American woods.

Dating from at least the 1700s, there are hundreds of variations. Sometimes it seems that every camp cook has his or her own version.

It's incredibly versatile, too. With a basic recipe you can make everything from pancakes to risen loaves.

I like mixing the dry ingredients ahead of time and keeping the mix in a plastic bag. Then all I need do in camp is add water, varying the amount depending on end use.

Basic Bannock Mix

2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
4 tbls powdered milk

The recipe can be multiplied as much as needed, and keeps fresh for at least six weeks.

For more about Bannock and other camp breads, go to Camp Bread. Recipes for cooking unique breads while camping in the field.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 7
no oil with water?

Gotta be 20 years ago there were numerous books out on how to make "mixes", to scoop and use in different recipes. Looked it up, 1978 was 30 years ago.....

Make-a-Mix by Karine Eliason and the follow up "More Make a Mix"......both make sense for camping.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Julie,

Of the dozens of Bannock recipes I've seen, maybe a third of them called for oil.

How many regular breads do you know of that call for oil? Basically bread is flour, salt, leavening and water. After than you can start enriching it with eggs, oils, milk, etc. if you desire. But they're not necessary with Bannock.

Consider, too, that Bannock started life as the bread of woods runners, who rarely had access to any sort of oil.

I do like addding foraged berries, though, blueberries in particular when they're in season.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 7
Ahh but nor did they have access to powdered milk. :)

Now, how do you cook your banock in a cast iron pan?
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
It's real easy, Nicko.

Mix your dough and pat it into a greased cast iron skillet. A typical recipe will work perfectly with a 9-10 inch pan.

Cook it over the fire until the bottom is browned and the dough stiffened. Then take the skillet off the fire and prop it up at a sharp angle in front of the fire---sort of like a reflector oven. Let it continue cooking that way until the top colors and the bread is cooked through.

In a sense, you're making a very thick, oversized pancake.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 7
Thanks. Is the dough more of a sticky dough? What about ash cakes have you made them? I had them on a canoe trip in Montana and really enjoyed them with wild strawberries.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Actually, Bannock is usually a fairly stiff dough. If you've ever made frybread it's only slightly softer than that. When you press it down into the skillet you can use your dry fingertips and it won't stick to them.

I had ash cakes many years ago. Must not have made much of an impression, though, because all I remember is having had eaten them. But no recollections as to taste, texture, etc.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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