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Making your own sweetened coconut

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
question for everyone: i'm in vietnam, helping friends set up an american style donut shop. both cake and yeast donuts. we have access to amazing fresh shredded coconut, and i want to try and make it into the sweetened kind i am used to in the usa, to put on the donuts. have googled the heck out of it, and not coming up with a DIY solution. any tips????? thanks and peace, scott
post #2 of 7
see: Dried Coconut | Coconut Facts

"fresh shredded" is probably too moist for what you're thinking.
the bagged stuff is dried and sweetened, as described above.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
right.......what i'm looking for is if anyone has ever made the sweetened kind themselves. i'm thinking of soaking the fresh grated cocnut in simple syrup, drain and squeeze, and then dry in the oven on low heat. if anyone else has any ideas.....great. thanks and peace
post #4 of 7
You have the right idea, but skip the simple syrup , because all you will wind up with is a sticky mess.
Cut the coconut then shred it, put it on a parchment paper sheet pan spread out. Set ove about 225-250 higher will most likely burn it or cook it as it contains natural sugars.When its dry take out let cool then toss with 10x sugar and shake off excess. I used this once to make coconut covered truffles it worked for me. You may want to brush doughnut with simple syrup so coconut will adhere to it. GOOD LUCK .:bounce:
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
cool. thanks ed. it's the consistency thing that will be lacking. it's nice for a donut, to have that "chewiness" that they chemically add to the angelflake type of coconut. got a great chocolate icing to dip in. peace
post #6 of 7
>> "chewiness" that they chemically add to the angelflake type of coconut.

while commercial stuff may have other odd ball ingredients, it's the "remaining moisture" that sets the flexibility / chewy property.

and I agree, lacking "factory controls" getting a consistent product in small one off batches is tricky.
post #7 of 7
How are you planning to store this coconut? If you do it in large batches, there may be a concern for mold or rancidity. If you make only what is needed for short term use, it may become a pain in the fanny just keeping up with demand. Is this something that can be vacuum sealed and frozen?
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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