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Preferred Heat Sources

Poll Results: Preferred Camping Heat Source

 
  • 61% (11)
    Open Wood Fire
  • 0% (0)
    Charcoal grill
  • 38% (7)
    Camp stove
  • 0% (0)
    Other
18 Total Votes  
post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
While I'm sure it varies depending on conditions, I was wondering what your favorite heat source is while camping. Why do you like that one best?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 
My choice is an open fire.

Sure, there are times and places where open fires are not feasible, or even illegal. But when I started camping and hiking, more years back than I care to remember, there was no other way to cook. And 15 years as an historic reenactor solidified my view---open fires are the only way you are allowed to cook at those events.

That aside, the flavors imparted by woodsmoke are unequaled by any other method. So, when possible, that's the way I go.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 19
wood fire is wonderful, camp stove is practical.....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #4 of 19
Wood fires are frequrently banned in my neck of the NOT woods and there are a number of areas where there simply isn't fuel for wood fires.

So I enjoy the camp stove simply because I know I can use it every time, every where.
post #5 of 19
I like to have a camp fire, but for cooking I'd rather use a camp stove.
post #6 of 19
I agree wood fires are banned so often that a camp stove is the best route. For quick trips I like my jet boil but for longer adventures and larger groups I use my MSR Dragonfly.
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Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #7 of 19
I don't use a fire for cooking. My choice if hiking, is a MSR Pocket Rocket stove, and if car camping, a gas Coleman two burner stove.
post #8 of 19
Wood fire if allowed, gas camp stove otherwise. Usually a combination of both, burgers over a wood fire are one of my favorites.
post #9 of 19
My vote was for open fire. Like others, I grew up camping where we always cooked over a campfire. My father didn't buy a Colement camp stove until after I enlisted in the Navy. Even today, I will cook over a mesquite charcoal fire at home and at Dutch oven events.
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
A point of irony. Nobody taking the poll has checked off charcoal grills as their preferred heat source. Yet, in both private and public campgrounds, I see numerous people using them---either on the fire rings and grills provided, or with small, portable units.

Just thought it interesting.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 19
Wood fire for almost everything except that first morning coffee. Need it too fast to wait around for the fire to get hot enough to boil.
post #12 of 19
The lack of people mentioning charcoal doesn't surprise me on this forum. Everyone here likes food done right and cooking over coal and other chemicals tastes like crap :lol:
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
What chemicals, Mary?

Lump charcoal has none; it's made just like the old-time stuff---hardwood is combusted in an anaerobic environment.

Briquettes, when properly prepared, have burned off their binders and other chemicals, and do not add off tastes to the food. The problem with briquettes is that many people start cooking over them before the coals are ready. Or, even worse, start them with lighter fluid, which definately lends its flavor to the food.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 19
Many of the popular brands of briquettes(Kingsford for one) are made with soft brown coal and shredded soft pine. The Kingsford thats out right now smells nasty.
post #15 of 19
I find the camp stove is good for cooking but the wood fire is great to roast marsch mellows and warn your feet and hand
Thanks,
Rick G
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Thanks,
Rick G
Have a great Day please check out my Free books and my smoothies recipes Free
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post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
>(Kingsford for one) are made with soft brown coal and shredded soft pine<

Finally got around to checking a bag of Kingsford, Mary. It says made from 100% hardwood.

Could you send me the documentation on soft coal and shredded pine? Thanks.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #17 of 19
Was it lump or briquettes? The lump is 100 % wood, the other are full of crap :lol: no matter what brand of lump you buy watch for foreign objects in the bag. Rocks, pop/beer cans, wire etc. :lol:
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
I specifically checked the briquettes, because that's what we were discussing.

Lump is always made of hardwood---there's really no other way to produce it. And, yes, you're right; there often is foreign material in the bag.

Did you know that historically charcoal making was one of the most dangerous occupations? The proceedure was to dig a huge pit, fill it with wood, ignite the wood, then backfill the hole. If---as happened far to often---the pit was opened too soon the result was a massive explosion.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 19
The show was in Discovery and they were at a Kingsford plant on the west coast(Washington?). They showed the making of briquettes and the regular Kingsford (not Kingsford Competition) were a mix of a lot of nasty stuff.
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