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Looking For Disaster Photos

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I'm working on an article about professional Chefs and would like to find a pic of the worst kitchen disaster. Burnt pots, incinerated food, etc. No injury related things.

The article will focus on the value of a Pro and the reality of paying a proper wage, rather than low-balling the Chef's salary to save a few bucks.

I've recently had a string of inquiries from people wanting to pay as low as $ 400 a week and they still expect a professional.

Thanks,

Paul

Credit for photo will be given.
post #2 of 9
Gladly share this mess:

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #3 of 9
I have one for a fridge, if you like. I only have the link, sorry if that offends:

Fridge, What Would You Do? | Well Done Chef!

Basically, we were sharing the fridge with the bar. Needless to say, this picture convinced the owners that giving us another walkin was the way to go.

I can laugh at this picture now.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Jason,

I've always been retentive about my walk-ins ,too. That one is pretty bad, thanks.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
OMG Jim,

That exemplifies the word NEGLECT. A friend bought a small restaurant many years ago that had gone belly-up and the owners just walked away from it. Food left out, power off. garbage cans were unemptied, and had been closed for entire summer. That mess and accompanying stench was pathetic.

Thanks
post #6 of 9
For the truly, soil your shorts photos, contact your local health dept. and your local Worker's Compensation board.

I'd like to read your work when done, as there are quite a few factors into why the hospitality biz is the way it is in N. America.

Too much competition is the main one, followed by no benchmark for what constitutes a "Cook"--that is, one who prepares and handles food. A "Chef", on the other hand is the boss, the manager; and this confusion (too many chiefs, not enough indians..) adds to the mix, as anyone in a poofy white hat can call themselves a "Chef". Cooking schools also have no benchmark to follow, and curriculums can range from 3 mths to 3 years. The public too, seems to focus more on quanitity than quality and have been brainwashed into tiipping only the waiter a percentage of the entire dining experience, and giving the kitchen a verbal compliment.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Low paying operators have the same set of complaints.

1. High food cost.

2. Having to spend too much time with kitchen oversight.

3. Lack of dedication.


Generally, the question of food safety doesn't doesn't come up, which surprises me, because if they have an episide of contanimation the cost will be enormous.


Bottom line - you get what you pay for.
post #8 of 9
Mmmmm... Factor in the hospitality unions(not what they do, 'cause they don't do anything, it's what they DON"T do....) and the lack of Gov't criteria for the schools or the trade in general, and you might have a piece on your hands that the media might actually sit up and notice.....

Sanitation skills are very basic, should be learned before even cooking--temps, times, rules, etc. Problem is, in N. America the focus is on the CHEF. How do you walk before you can crawl? How can you become a Chef before you can cook? Even the ACF is kinda murky about what a cook is--s'cuse me, I mean "culinarian", they only want to focus on the "Chefs".

I say, look after the pennies, and the dollars will look after themselves. Focus on the making of a COOK, not the Chef......
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #9 of 9
That walk in looks great compared to a place I worked a couple years, ago, I kid you not!:eek::beer:
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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