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Nothing new in the cooking world

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
So, I finally found a source of affordable fennel bulbs. I mean I love them. But at four bucks a pop for really small bulbs it just ain’t gonna happen. One market in my area has them, though, for only $1.50 each. And they’re good sized bulbs.

I started fooling around, and came up with what I called a fennel & oyster chowder. Only it’s not thick, like a chowder. More like a cream broth. Drop dead delicious.

I call my son to ask if he wants the recipe. “I’ve already got a recipe for that,” he said. Seems that when he and his bride were touring Normandy they were served such a dish, and wheedled the recipe out of the chef.

All this demonstrates, once again, is that there’s nothing new under the culinary sun. Whatever you invent, chances are somebody else has done it before.

I’m curious, therefore, what dishes you’ve come up with on your own that you later found out were well known?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 13
I do a (white) fish lasagna. brown some panko, typical saute of whatever you like mix of onion/leek/scallion/shallot + mushroom + green pepper, ad back the panko - perhaps a drizzle of olive oil to make a nice "stuffing" - layer the fish&stuffing and bake.

it's got to exist somewhere in the world - fish & stuffing isn't exactly rocket science.
post #3 of 13
Happened to me last week. I had some lamb chump chops, wanted to make a casserole. Marinated the chopped chops in yoghurt & spices overnight. Did the usual brown off some onion, add various spices, garlic etc, bit of flour, add stock and various sauces, tinned crushed tomatoes and tomato paste to make a good sauce, plonked the lamb and yoghurt marinade in, covered, cooked long n slow till fall apart soft.

It was delish - thought - hey, this is something new!

Naah, it was pretty much a rogan josh. Rats.
Had never tried it that way before - even if I didn't invent it, I'll add that to my top ten list.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 13
True story:

When I first came to the US I discovered Peanut Butter. I grew up on Nutella (chocolate and hazelnut paste), and decided that Peanut Butter must be some kind of US equivalent to Nutella, so I bought a jar and took it home. Opened the jar, took a spoon, swallowed it... PWOUUUAAAAH... spat everything. Disgusting! What is that thing? Eeeeeeeew.

Then I realized I had bought the unsweetened peanut butter jar! What a dum dum. Back to the supermarket and got a sweetened peanut butter jar. Tasted- YES! Much better. But then I quickly grew tired of it and the jar sat in my fridge unused for the next 3 years before I came to terms with the idea of throwing it in the bin. So long.

Then I thought of a genius idea! What if I were to use the unsweeted peanut butter with something sweet! Surely that's got to be good. So I bought a new jar of the unsweeted stuff, went home, spread some of it on a slice of bread, then sliced some wild blueberry jam on top. DELICIOUS! Surely I must be some kind of culinary genius.

Few days later I'm at a friend's, and he asks me if I want a PB & J sandwhich. "A what?" (in my best Jim Carrey impersonation: "What did you just call me?") Then he explained... and ever since I've felt pretty silly really. Here I was thinking I was going to reinvent the PB & J sandwhich. :look:
post #5 of 13
Lol French Fries -it's an embarassing feeling isn't it? But still, the food is still good and you still enjoy it. The reason its been done by someone before you is that the flavours go together - it works.

P.S. I actually prefer PB & honey, but that's just me.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #6 of 13
Well honestly it's more funny than anything. :talk:

One thing my friend taught me though is to put MUCH LESS of the stuff. I was piling both the PB and the jam. He showed me how to spread a very thin layer of PB, then a rather thin layer of jam, for a perfectly balanced, not too sweet, not too buttery sandwhich.

But really nothing beats a crepe with banana slices and Nutella... well when you grew up on that anyway!
post #7 of 13
Peanut butter potato chip sandwich :lol:
post #8 of 13
Sometimes it can work out to be good thing.

Way back, like in my late teens, I was an obsessive home cook. I was constantly throwing dinner parties, always experimenting (that stuff one thing into another thing stage of life, hum, I wonder what Freud would say about that?) and trying new things.

One dish I made for myself, and really enjoyed was a noodle cake made from left over pasta. As many great things are this came from being horribly hung over and desperate for fried starch. All I had was a bowl of angle hair from the night before that had fused into a somesort of pasta man-of-war. Anyway formed into a ball and fried it turned out really tasty. I toyed with this concept over the next little while (finally settling on a soba noddle cake that I put with seared fish) but would never admit to anybody that I would eat such a thing. Seemed too "trashy."

Flash forward a couple of monthes. I'm at the gym on a Saturday for the PBS cooking line-up of the day. On comes Charlie Trotter's kitchen sessions. Oh, yeah, I read something about this guy in Food and Wine. And here he is making a celeriac soup with a fried noodle gallette. That moment made me realize that maybe my instincts for food might be better than I thought. That maybe I could make a go of it. Ten years latter, I did make that jump.

So, basicly, I'm going to sue Chef Trotter for ruining my life. (kidding..)

--Al
post #9 of 13
Slightly the other way round...

My grumpy old fart of a brother-in-law told me to try a crunchy peanut butter and pickled beetroot sandwich. (must be good white bread and use butter on the beetroot side). Anyway, i thought, after tasting this culinary masterpiece, that no way did that old bugger make that up. Everyone must know about it. But no! Have never met another PB &B lover.

Ps sweet vinegar pickle is best
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #10 of 13
And, you are surprised by this, Bughut?:crazy:
post #11 of 13
Aw Ishbel, Trying is believing. It's blooming gorgeous.

Granted, you wouldnt want one in ur packed lunch. One wrong move, and everythings purple goo.

Give it a go. I dares ya!!

Buy Baxters beetroot in sweet vinegar. ( the only thing they make that i like. Have you tried their tinned soup? cue up-chuck smilie)
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #12 of 13
If only I liked PB! The pickled beetroot I can take!
I quite like their 'Poacher's Broth' soup - it's no' bad!
post #13 of 13
A while ago, Hagen-Dasz and Food Network teamed up for an ice cream flavor contest. I concocted Coconut Mango Curry ice cream. It was delicious, although the first batch had too much curry in it. A recipe wasn't required, just a short write-up about the flavor(s). I noted it would be a wonderful flavor to end a south Asian or Asian meal, and that more people in North America are eating those flavors.

I submitted my idea and got no reply. At all. Period. (Or full stop :D)

The winner was Sticky Toffee Pudding. Since that dessert already exists in terms of the flavor combination, if not as an ice cream flavor, I didn't think it was that much of a reach for a nation-wide contest. Achingly sweet beat out flavor complexity.

Still, I've never seen this flavor anywhere.
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