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what is the worst thing a server can do to make you mad? - Page 12

post #331 of 483


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ResQDoc View Post



Do you put that into open table when you

I rarely make reservations, and I've never used Open Table, for places I'm unfamiliar with and I always reserve the right to leave, as does any customer!

 

With regards to the caution sign, I neglected to add the smiley crazy.gif because it was typed with my tongue firmly in my cheek!

 

Push your choices on me as a guest and I'll walk out! (It is MY money and I'll spend it as I want!)

 

Push your choices on me as an employer and you won't be hired! (It is MY money and I'll spend it as I want!)

 

Push your choices on my guests and your fired ON THE SPOT! (You are endangering MY income!)

 

Let me be VERY clear, I said PUSH your choices, I did NOT say make your choices. And for me, visible tattoos or piercings are "pushing your choices", just as any other "public displays" of any other "private choices" would be as well.

 

If one wants a successful career in a service industry such as restaurants, one should plan ahead and maximize the opportunities for success and recognize that personal choice(s) may limit those opportunities either in a minor or major way. If you are comfortable limiting your opportunities, so be it. Just do not expect me to adjust to you.

 

It saddens me to think that my views may offend you. However, IMHO, the world does not have to accept your choices, you have to accept the world's choices, no matter how distasteful it may be to you.

 

In other words, YOU have to live with the consequences of YOUR choices, I do not have to accept or tolerate your choices. That is MY choice, not yours!

 


 

 


Edited by PeteMcCracken - 5/23/11 at 9:56pm
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post #332 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post


 

I rarely make reservations, and I've never used Open Table, for places I'm unfamiliar with and I always reserve the right to leave, as does any customer!

 

With regards to the caution sign, I neglected to add the smiley crazy.gif because it was typed with my tongue firmly in my cheek!

 

Push your choices on me as a guest and I'll walk out! (It is MY money and I'll spend it as I want!)

 

Push your choices on me as an employer and you won't be hired! (It is MY money and I'll spend it as I want!)

 

Push your choices on my guests and your fired ON THE SPOT! (You are endangering MY income!)

 

Let me be VERY clear, I said PUSH your choices, I did NOT say make your choices. And for me, visible tattoos or piercings are "pushing your choices", just as any other "public displays" of any other "private choices" would be as well.

 

If one wants a successful career in a service industry such as restaurants, one should plan ahead and maximize the opportunities for success and recognize that personal choice(s) may limit those opportunities either in a minor or major way. If you are comfortable limiting your opportunities, so be it. Just do not expect me to adjust to you.

 

It saddens me to think that my views may offend you. However, IMHO, the world does not have to accept your choices, you have to accept the world's choices, no matter how distasteful it may be to you.

 

In other words, YOU have to live with the consequences of YOUR choices, I do not have to accept or tolerate your choices. That is MY choice, not yours!

 


 

 


No, you are correct and entitled to your opinions.

 

This is America and by virtue, a free nation.

 

Your views do not sadden me, as much as it does make me have a bit of sympathy for you.

 

I have never interviewed for a position in ANY restaurant and have been told, sorry, we cant hire you because you do not fit our appearance guidelines.

 

As far as I know...that is something you can be sued for if you were to ever admit that you did not hire someone that was obviously qualified based off of your thoughts of how they live their lifestyle outside of your place of business.

 

Its no different than not hiring someone thats gay...or a satanist. At least they have the luxury of being able to hide their choices.

 

The world is changing at a million miles a second my friend.

 

Not keeping up can possibly get you into trouble.

 

ESPECIALLY when you mix politics with business.

 

 

post #333 of 483

ResQDoc, I sincerely hope you are merely playing devil's advocate, because if you believe what you're saying my advice is that you never open a restaurant of your own. It's destined to fail.

 

Rule #1 in the service world: The customer makes the rules.

Rule #2: For those times the customer is wrong, see rule #1.

 

Take your last point: No, I would never specify that when making reservations. But if I were assigned a server whose personal adornment disturbed me I would certainly request a different server. If that request is denied, then so, too, is my patronage. I'd pick myself and my party up and leave. The world is full of restaurants that recognize their function is to cater to my wishes and desires.

 

Let me ask you this. What if we have a server who provides ideal service, however you define it, but who, for reasons of personal choice, had not bathed in a week? Based on your argument, that would be perfectly ok, because the quality of the service was 110%, even though you objected to the miasma drifting across the table.

 

Do you really see that as any different than having a server covered up with tasteless tatoos and body piercings?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #334 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

ResQDoc, I sincerely hope you are merely playing devil's advocate, because if you believe what you're saying my advice is that you never open a restaurant of your own. It's destined to fail.

 

Rule #1 in the service world: The customer makes the rules.

Rule #2: For those times the customer is wrong, see rule #1.

 

Take your last point: No, I would never specify that when making reservations. But if I were assigned a server whose personal adornment disturbed me I would certainly request a different server. If that request is denied, then so, too, is my patronage. I'd pick myself and my party up and leave. The world is full of restaurants that recognize their function is to cater to my wishes and desires.

 

Let me ask you this. What if we have a server who provides ideal service, however you define it, but who, for reasons of personal choice, had not bathed in a week? Based on your argument, that would be perfectly ok, because the quality of the service was 110%, even though you objected to the miasma drifting across the table.

 

Do you really see that as any different than having a server covered up with tasteless tatoos and body piercings?


To be quite honest, while not claiming to have owned any establishments, I have been the Executive Chef at a couple of extremely successful places on the east coast, and  haveI learned one thing about owning a restaurant: Either own the place, and hire good management and stay out of the way, or chose a side of the house and stick to it. Its almost impossible to do all three as an owner. It has been done, but it is rare.

 

As far as your little jab about whether or not I would be successful if I ever decided to take on an endeavor - You apparently know nothing about trending and how good restaurants become great ones.

 

One word - regulars.

 

If I open a restaurant, I am going to run it how I want to run it, and I will hire who I please. 

 

I understand the juggling act involved in a night out, as well as the orchestration involved in an amazing dining experience...and I will tell you one other thing I have picked up along the way.

 

If people REALLY want to eat at your establishment, THEY DONT CARE WHAT THE SERVER LOOKS LIKE. They care about QUICK SERVICE but having the LUXURY of TAKING THEIR TIME. They care about CLEAN LINEN. Wine glasses that dont have SPOTS on them. They care about FEELING LIKE THEY ARE THE ONLY PEOPLE DINING IN THAT ROOM. They care about going and being made to feel like they DONT HAVE A CARE IN THE WORLD except HOW FAR OUT DO I HAVE TO MAKE A RESERVATION?

 

99% of patrons, from my past 16 years in the industry, could care less about a nose stud, or a neck tattoo.

 

As far as the open table comment, yes. I was being facetious.

 

 

 

Define what offends you.

 

What would the deal breaker be?

 

There was nothing stated about tasteless tattoos vs. tattoos that are done in good taste. It simply stated "Tattoos above the neckline."

 

I am glad to see that at least someone knows the difference though.

 

 

Perhaps I should clear something up - Piercings can be taken out and spacers can be put in. Tattoos can be covered up to a point. I have never seen a server with hand tattoos. I have never seen a server with face tattoos. Why?

 

Because it is a bit extreme. People are not willing and ready to see that side of culture.

 

If I got that server at Palace Kitchen, Per Se or Trotters, would I be offended or ask for a different server?

 

No.

 

Why? Because obviously, they must do SOMETHING right, otherwise, they wouldnt have a job.

 

 

 

To think that someone would not hire someone else that has an immaculate resume, based soley on appearance would be "financial suicide" is ridiculous.

 

"Neck ink" is predominately displayed by those connected with criminal street gangs."

 

What an ignorant thing to say.

 

Know what else is connected to criminal street gangs?

 

Minorities.

 

Youths.

 

Give me a break.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As far as your question on bathing - Its null and void. I wouldnt ask for another server....I would not eat there based on the fact that it is unsanitary.

 

If you go to Europe though, you will run into PLENTY of places where the waitstaff smells of sweat and BO.

 

Why? Because deodorant is not as widely used there as it is here.

 

It does not mean they dont bathe.

 

 


Edited by ResQDoc - 5/26/11 at 9:51am
post #335 of 483

You nailed it Jim. Having worked in restaurants as both cook and wait staff, I know for certain that many people unreasonably expect the kind of service you get at a fast food restaurant.Place your order and have it served to you in 2-5 minutes. Cooks try to prepare all the meals for a single table so they arrive at the table within a few minutes of each other. That way some of the dinner guests are not sitting there eating while the others watch them and none of them have to ask if everyone else minds if they start eating or not. Some orders are more involved and time consuming to prepare than others which is why some dinner guests get their order before the guest siting next to them and often times the cook staff will prepare the easier,faster orders to clear the order wheel as fast as possible. There is very little slack time in a busy kitchen and when you get a chance to clear the wheel you take it because it then gives you time to do more prep work for the next round of orders. A good kitchen with good staff, both cook and wait, operates like a finely tuned machine. Everything runs in smooth harmony. Cooks help each other and work in unison and waiters remind you of their orders and their tables.It's a joy to work in that environment and I've worked in both good and bad. You can either hate going to work or hope your shift never ends. A Rule of Thumb, if you walk into a restaurant and almost every table is full, expect to wait for your orders and don't blame the waiters.They want you to get your order as fast as you do.

post #336 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by ResQDoc View Post

If people REALLY want to eat at your establishment, THEY DONT CARE WHAT THE SERVER LOOKS LIKE.


This statement here is, "post hoc, ergo propter hoc" or, "after this, therefore because of this."  Your statement presupposes that the people already want to eat at your establishment because of all of the reasons that you listed.  However, it doesn't acknowledge that the people who DON'T want to eat at your establishment might not do so because they do care what the server looks like.

 

Honestly, you guys are fighting a two headed battle as there are people who won't patronize a restaurant because they're uncomfortable with what someone might consider an outlandish appearance and those that would gladly give them their custom because they're fine with it.  Can ya'll just agree to disagree so the thread can get back on topic?

 

post #337 of 483

I wonder if there is an underlying fundamental that is at issue rather than "appearance": that of individuals forcing the group to accept the individual's choices. If one chooses to "serve the public" then, IMHO, the "public" determines the choices and the individual either conforms or finds another vocation.

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post #338 of 483

Quote RsQDoc;

...If you go to Europe though, you will run into PLENTY of places where the waitstaff smells of sweat and BO.

Why? Because deodorant is not as widely used there as it is here....

 

You're almost funny! As a European I wonder how much of the rest of your statements are true  ...


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 5/27/11 at 3:07am
post #339 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

I wonder if there is an underlying fundamental that is at issue rather than "appearance": that of individuals forcing the group to accept the individual's choices. If one chooses to "serve the public" then, IMHO, the "public" determines the choices and the individual either conforms or finds another vocation.

 

That's kind of the common sense line of thinking... a business lives and dies by its customers.  Tatted up servers would probably be fine in metropolitan areas, but not so much in a rural bible belt establishment.

post #340 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by ResQDoc View Post

If you go to Europe though, you will run into PLENTY of places where the waitstaff smells of sweat and BO. Why? Because deodorant is not as widely used there as it is here.

 

Not to mention, no cars, no running water and no electricity. biggrin.gif

 

post #341 of 483

Being told: "no problem" every time I ask for something. "can I have more coffee"? No problem. "can we have our dessert to share"? No problem. "thank you for taking care of us"? No problem.

 

If it seemed like a problem, I probably wouldn't even ask you. Answering "no problem" infers it may have been a problem, but right now it's not a problem.

 

Serving customers' meals should never infer there's any kind of problem!

post #342 of 483

Having to wait forever (especially when I'm pressed for time) to get my bill - and worst, awaiting change from large denomination in order to leave tip!  Can't leave all - still gotta buy milk!

post #343 of 483

I have to comment on number 4 of your post:

 

Some restaurants require servers to work in a team where all servers are responsible to deliver food, refill drinks, pre-bus, fulfill requests (ketchup, hot sauce, this is too cold, etc.). Its called "the loop" as soon as they leave the kitchen (full hands means they have to carry something to the FOH with them) then make their loop around the dining room looking for anything they can do to help all guests enjoy their experience and keep the dining room flowing. Then after they have found something to do, they do it, and go back to the kitchen with full hands. You are tipping the server for being a good assistant to not only you but everyone in the dining room/bar. When more than one server assists you they are merely ensuring your happiness thus the server assigned to you will reap the benefits, but further more you will return to the establishment for the same attentive service. Not all restaurants have a good "team" flow, that's due to management whom probably suck at training and directing their staff.

 

Tip the server for being a good server, it doesnt matter who actually helped you the entire time unless your server was in the service station texting her boyfriend or picking her nose and blowing off her responsibilities to the dining room as a whole.

post #344 of 483

I agree to the fullest. That is due to poor management training. Giving servers and host/hostesses scripts was the best idea when I was FOH manager. They were to say, "of course" "be right back" "I'm happy to" "just one moment please" etc.

 

Its never a PROBLEM for a server to do their job, because if it was they would not be working for me. To add to the dumb comments some of them make: "are you still working on that?" I absolutely hate when a server says that refering to my meal...I am not deconstructing the plate as a job, eating is not a chore, work, nor laboristic. I do not "work" on my meal I work my business, I work my phone, I work in my garden, I do NOT work on my meal; I enjoy my meal.

 

Instead of that dumb question they should check on their patrons by saying: "was there anything you needed to further enjoy your entre?" "would you like water?" "I have a delicious sauce that you might enjoy, let me get you a sample" or how about approaching the table and just saying, "that is a delicious ribeye isnt it? I had it yesterday and it is to die for, good choice!"

post #345 of 483

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wine not 0911 View Post

You are tipping the server for being a good assistant to not only you but everyone in the dining room/bar.


Have to seriously disagree here.

 

I tip the server for the service they give me.  I could honestly care less that they're waiting hand and foot on the 12-top across the room and the couple next to us.  If they're neglecting me and mine, they're not going to see nearly as much gratuity from me...  And, actually, as a customer, it irks me that I don't have a consistent server at some places -- a relationship between a customer and server is a nice thing to build upon.  It makes it easier for me to determine how much I want to tip based on their level of service and, cuts down on confusion and uncomfortable moments when someone I don't know asks me if I want a refill and, when they don't promptly return, my regular server pops by and asks me the same question.
 

 

 

post #346 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob W View Post

 


Have to seriously disagree here.

 

I tip the server for the service they give me.  I could honestly care less that they're waiting hand and foot on the 12-top across the room and the couple next to us.  

I have to seriously agree here!

 

A group of four of us went to a small Italian restaurant, and discovered that our waiter was also waiting on a huge table of TV journalists (on expense accounts, we could tell). Our guy spent all his effort fawning on them, buttering them up. laughing at their jokes, etc., while we waited a half hour to order. He made a couple of errors on our orders, never refilled our drinks, and essentially forgot us. We had to threaten to walk out without paying in order to get our checks, which were scribbled on Post-It notes with the sales tax wrong (he must have guessed the amounts) and the math incomprehensible. The engineering geek in the group (ahem!) had to whip out his calculator and re-figure everything. I forget what we tipped him, but we were not generous. I'm sure the journalists thought the service was great.

 

The place closed before we ever went back.
 

 

George
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post #347 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by ResQDoc View Post
Or would one call ahead: "Hi, yes, this is Mr. Smith. I have reservations for 4 tomorrow night. Tell me, does you establishment employee people that have any showing tattoos, or may at one time in their lives been involved in any "shady" activities, or crimes of any sort?"

 

smile.gif

LOL! No, just let the guests choose when they show up. "Party of four? Will that be crime or non-crime?"
 

 

George
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post #348 of 483

I was once served by a waiter in Papua New Guinea who had a bone in his nose.  The specialty that evening was monkey brains.  I did not comment on the bone and asked for the vegetarian plate.

post #349 of 483

I hate all cell phone use by waiters/waitresses.  You aren't being paid to text or talk on your phone.

 

I don't know who decided to start serving lemons and limes in water, but it can be challenging to get plain water in ANY restaurant, even McDonalds.  I enjoy plain, clear, cold, ice water without any fruit.  If I wanted fruit, I would order a Gin and Tonic.  What I hate MUCH MORE is when I tell the waiter that I want "Ice Water without Lemons" and the either bring it with the lemon or bring a glass of water with no ice AND a lemon.  Which part of "Ice Water" did you NOT get!

 

I also hate when they say "Would you like change?" when the bill was 40.00 and you give them a 100.00.  Yeah, right!  The tip is 60.00!?!  Someone said that they let a server get away with that scenario.  I would have ripped the server and manager a new one.

 

But, thankfully, there are many many more professional servers than not.  So I love going out to eat.

post #350 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Innkeeper215 View Post

 

 

But, thankfully, there are many many more professional servers than not.  So I love going out to eat.

And we appreciate the professional ones all the more after reading all these stories!
 

 

--Lyle
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post #351 of 483

A few weeks ago i went to dinner with my family the waitress began talking with my parents and within a few minutes had pulled up a chair and was telling us her life story, she stayed there for a half an hour and had to come back to get our orders...

post #352 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKChef View Post

I was once served by a waiter in Papua New Guinea who had a bone in his nose.  The specialty that evening was monkey brains.  I did not comment on the bone and asked for the vegetarian plate.


Well, now! There's that unique signature menu item you've been looking for!

 

--Lyle
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--Lyle
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post #353 of 483

I have been a server and know their job can be tough.  The worst I read here was the not returning any change on a $42 check and arguing about serving the wrong beer and also being treated as though invisible(this sounds like the hostess did not do her job).

I have to say what I dislike most about servers is when I'm cooking and they come running in calling orders, this is what the POS system is for.

post #354 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Craig View Post

Being told: "no problem" every time I ask for something. "can I have more coffee"? No problem. "can we have our dessert to share"? No problem. "thank you for taking care of us"? No problem.

 

If it seemed like a problem, I probably wouldn't even ask you. Answering "no problem" infers it may have been a problem, but right now it's not a problem.

 

Serving customers' meals should never infer there's any kind of problem!

I feel similarly about the word "perfect." To hear that my choice of entree is "perfect," that the vegetable I've selected is also "perfect" and, surprise surprise,  my beverage order is...  you see where I'm going with this. Then again, when greeted in the restaurant with "how are you this evening," are you really going to take the question seriously?

 

post #355 of 483

I watch the stuff the Travel Channel foodies eat and wonder, should I?  Then my friend got food poisoning from eating grasshoppers fried in blood sausage in rancid oil in India.

 - I wonder how the service was... 

post #356 of 483

Hi  All

 

Hope I'm not too late to join in on this thread. The thing that makes me most mad when being served is when the waiter or waitress has a heavy cold.  They blow their nose right in front of everyone then proceed to either bring the cutlery or pour the drinks, yuk! then of course they bring the food and I wonder how many more times that snotty nose has been blow in the interim

post #357 of 483
The worst for me is when the waitress acts "put out" or inconvenienced by my presence. It's a simple job that should not inconvenience anyone.
post #358 of 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Matt View Post

The worst for me is when the waitress acts "put out" or inconvenienced by my presence. It's a simple job that should not inconvenience anyone.


I agree that service should not be an inconvenience to a server, but I disagree strongly that it's a simple job.  It's not rocket science, but it certainly isn't simple.

post #359 of 483

Lentil, I'd like your further thoughts on why you think the job isn't simple.

 

I used to be a server. If my legs would let me, I'd still be doing that for a living. It can be frustrating. And tiring. And sometimes make you agree with my old professor who used to say, "the more I'm around people the more I like my dog." All those and more. But there's nothing particularly complex about the job.

 

It's not rocket science,.......

 

Everything is relative. I have a friend who is a rocket scientist. And he hates that expression. Insists thkat there's nothing particularly difficult about rocket science, and, therefore, the phrase actually means the opposite of what's intended.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #360 of 483

Matt...since you have posted that you are a home chef you obviously have no idea what a wait person does or else you would not have made that blanket statement.

Waiting tables is a noble profession, unfortunately many people who ARE wait staff really shouldn't be.

Those who are, should not have to make their living on the paltry tips that customers leave them. If the dining public really knew what the job entails, they'd be inclined to tip properly.

Wait staff are used and abused more then most professions, mainly because they take the blame when anything goes wrong in the back of the house. They are the representatives of the restaurant, and are what the customer sees. The job is anything but simple, and the fact that YOU think it is simple reflects the judgement of much of the dining public.

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