or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Cincinnati Chili
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cincinnati Chili

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Cincinnati Chili | CopyKat Recipes

anyone ever make this stuff? if so, how is it?
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
post #2 of 12
The concept is worthwhile but execution is everything.

I've made similar things though that style of chili doesn't appeal to me.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 12
There are several versions of Cincinnati chili. Their hallmarks are that they are thinner than most chilies, sweeter tasting, and served over spaghetti.

I'm like Phil on this; don't care for it much at all. But it's very popular in the Ohio Valley.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have to work in a city that has a skyline chili in the parking lot of the hotel.
I was hoping to have some of this and then, if I like it, come home and make it.
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
post #5 of 12
I know this is a tardy response, and forgive a new user for reviving a slightly old thread. But I think I can add something.

I grew up in the Ohio Valley, and yes "Cincinnati Chili" is a great treat, unique but a worthy thing to try. Over the last two years, I've worked on my own Chili recipe, and I've found away to tweak it to make it taste extraordinarily similar to what you would get at "Steak 'n Shake" restaurant or similar place specializing in Cinci style Chili. In the "notes" section of the recipe at the bottom there are instructions for how to make it taste "Cinci" style, I think under "Variations." I don't know how to attach a file so I'm going to cut and paste a quote from my recipe file. This is portioned to make a good gallon or two of chili; scale it down if you aren't into left overs. People focus on beer in Chili. It's good. But to me, the cocoa and the coffee are far more critical for a complex and robust taste:

Good & Crafty Chili

This flexible recipe is hearty and flavorful, but can be used as a base to tailor to your personal chili tastes – heat level, tomato taste, meatiness, texture, and amount of beans. Notes below make suggestions about serving and variations.

The Goods:

Round 1
·2 tbsp. oil or fat*
  • 3 large or 4 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds ground or finely chopped beef
  • 3/4 pound pork, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced

Round 2
  • 2 c. peeled, diced tomatoes (or one 14.5 oz can is OK)
  • 12 oz. tomato paste
  • 1/2 c. packed brown sugar
  • 4 tbsp. chili powder
  • 1 tbsp. cumin seeds
  • 1 tbsp. unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 fresh Jalapeno peppers, cut into quarters**

Round 3
  • 12 oz. (bottle or can) of dark beer
  • 1 c. strong coffee
  • 2 c. beef broth (or use one 14.5 oz. can)
  • 4 (15 oz.) cans kidney beans

Notes:
*there is no particular need for a fine or mild oil; other flavors will predominate. Screw that Rachel Ray "evoo" crap.
**see notes in “variations” on adjusting heat to taste.

The Craft:
This recipe shows where manipulating one basic chemistry principle really pays off – Surface-to-area ratio. We will make liberal use of the food processor to take advantage of this to help bring out the taste of individual ingredient in the final result.

Round 1 – 15 minutes
In your food processor, chop 1 ½ pounds of beef cuts of your choice (preferably - or use pre-ground hamburger mix). Repeat with ¾ pound of pork from ribs, loin, roast, or chops (packaged ground pork is acceptable, too, though will be fattier). In a soup or stock pot, add the onions to hot oil and sauté a few minutes to soften, then add the meat. Sauté on medium heat until there is a small amount of pink visible in the meat, and then add garlic for last few minutes until meat is finished. The meat will simmer later, so do not over-brown it. Once browned, spoon the sauté back into the food processor and pulse a few times to break up chunks and provide a smooth sauté.

Rounds 2 and 3 – 1 hour
While Round 1 ingredients are sautéing, wash food processor bowl carefully and then combine all round 2 ingredients in the bowl and process until a paste forms and chilis are well shredded. Combine Round 2 and 3 ingredients into the pot. Bring to a strong simmer, then reduce to low heat and simmer slowly for an hour, stirring periodically.

The Finish:
Serving ideas:
1)In a bowl, with grated cheddar cheese and/or diced onions, and a dollop of sour cream.
2)Spooned on ½ serving (1 oz dry) thin pasta such as spaghetti or linguini, and top with grated Parmesan or Romano cheese and/or diced onions. Top with 1 to 2 tbsp. of ketchup. A very accurate “Cincinnati” style chili or “Steak ‘n Shake” type Chili-mac copy.
3)On your cheeseburgers or with hot dogs .

Variations:
·If you like chunkier chili, cube ½ or more of the beef and finely chop the rest.
·This recipe is not overly “beany.” If you prefer fewer beans, halve them, or if you need to stretch the recipe, there is a sufficient meat and vegetable base to add 1 or at most 2 more cans. If you need to stretch the recipe, consider serving as in 2) above and it will provide 50% or double the servings.
·To adjust heat upward or downward, substitute serrano chilis for jalapeno (hotter) or core and de-seed your peppers (milder)
·If you do not have a strong dark beer, skip the beer altogether - double the cocoa portion for the liquid content, substitute red wine, more beef broth, or even chicken broth. I find Beck’s Dark works well – strong, flavorful, easy to find in markets and economically priced.
·Prepare one to two days ahead for picnic, tailgates, parties, etc. It will be smoother and more complex on following days. It refrigerates and freezes well, so don’t hesitate to make a large portion and keep or store.

Credit: I cobbled this recipe together from folk recipes passed around and is not based on any particular published recipe in any cook book or Web site that I know.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey you Seattle-ite thanks for sharing this.
Come Halloween, when we always love to do chili, I'll copy this off and set it aside for then.
Love the sound and looks of it.
BTW Oro, you wrote that very well I'm impressed.

Oh, I just reread it.
First, I'm allergic to beer, no, really.
So that's out, is there a substitute I can use?
Also, I don't care for, and I'm sorry to say this but it's true, kidney beans.
Can I use red or pinto or navy beans instead?
Promise not to tweak anything else.:blush:
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
post #7 of 12
Hi LuvPie,

Thanks for the comments. Look under "variations" - I put a few ideas of other "wet" ingredients to use instead of beer. I'd suggest red wine, or a a mix of that, beef broth, or a little more coffee to substitute.

I think it would work fine to use whatever beans you want. To make it really taste "Cinci" style, be sure to serve it with ketchup and crackers over pasta (cheese optional). I know, that sounds tawdry, but it actually works to give it the "cinci" flavor.

So you didn't think the recipe was to "wordy"? I have been experimenting with a semi-instructional way of writing up recipes so less-experienced cooks can follow it. I'm trying that so I can launch a blog with recipes and they are accessible to cooks of varying levels. I would appreciate comments. I've tried to pare the explanations down to the minimum needed, but I feel it's too "wordy" compared to how recipes are traditionally presented (bare list of ingredients and steps - with the assumption a user already knows how to make a roux, for example).
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
hi Oro

my way of talking is to paint a picture with my words.
that way, in your mind you are also able to
see what I'm trying to convey.

where some may refer to it as wordsy, and BTW they do:crazy:
others find it useful and an adventageous tool.

best advice, do it how it feels right to you.
personally, I love details....
one exception =
a person who hoards the entire conversation
with their wordsiness. that drives me a bit over the edge.
you know the kind I'm talking about.
the ones with a stamp on their forehead
IAAM

see i just got too wordsy:(
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
post #9 of 12
David is from Cincinnati and a friend of his came up with this easy version. We use the ground turkey and it's fabulous. One of our major comfort foods. And we serve it over linguine with grated cheddar or jack cheese.

Cincinnati Chili

3 lbs. Ground Beef or Turkey
1 Qt. Water
4 Onions chopped
4 Tsp Cumin
4 Tsp Chili Powder
1 Tsp Allspice
1 Tsp Garlic Powder
2 Tsp Crushed Red Pepper
1 Tsp Cinnamon
2 Tsp Salt
4 Garlic Cloves Garlic sliced
2 Tbsp Worcestershire Sauce
1½ Tbsp Distilled White Vinegar
16 oz. Tomato Paste
28 oz. Can of Whole Tomatoes
1 Tbsp Brown Sugar
2 cans 16 oz. Kidney Beans (drained)
5 Bay Leaves

Bring everything to a boil and simmer for 3 hours partially covered
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Emily, does this ever sound good on the rainiest night ever!!!
Extra very fine cheddar on mine please :)
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
Reply
post #11 of 12


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oro View Post



I think it would work fine to use whatever beans you want. To make it really taste "Cinci" style, be sure to serve it with ketchup and crackers over pasta (cheese optional). I know, that sounds tawdry, but it actually works to give it the "cinci" flavor.
 

I've been lurking on this site for quite a while; running across this thread motivated me to register and 1st post. Sorry to "necro-post" an old thread, but as a Cincinnati native, I had to add a note for posterity. In the 35 years or so I've been eating Cincy style chili, not once have I ever seen or heard anyone suggest putting catsup on it. Never. However, a small bowl of oyster crackers to munch on or put on the chili is always served and optionally, *hot sauce* such as Tabasco, Franks, etc. is available at the table.

 

Folks in this city will argue who originated (or popularized) this style of chili, but most will say "Skyline", which is the king. 

 

Skyline and most other copycats serve the chili in "ways":

 

3 way = Chili over spaghetti, topped with grated cheese (a mix of colby and cheddar)

4 way = the above with either onion or beans (must specify)

5 way = Chili, spaghetti, beans, onions, cheese.

 

Optionally, it's also served Coney style over a hot dog on a bun, topped with cheese.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skyline_Chili

 

 

Doug

post #12 of 12

Welcome to Cheftalk, Doug. Or at least the the world of those who post.

 

One piece of advice: No need to apologize when you have something meaningful to add. So what if it's an older thread? We always have more to learn.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Cincinnati Chili