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Peeled garlic--

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
A while back I asked about country of origin of the peeled garlic I've been using and it was suggested that most peeled garlic comes from China. This week I purchased a new batch and was surprised to find it now labeled with country of origin--in this case: Mexico!

The cloves (if that's the right term?) are much larger than the Chinese garlic.

regards,
lobsterpot1
post #2 of 9

absolutely!

thats correct.

garlic comes frm the family alliaceae, and a bulb of garlic is made up of separate cloves. Interestingly, there are single-cloved garlic that grow in China. No clue about bottled garlic from mexico vs china though. :chef:
post #3 of 9
You are right. Over 50% of U.S. restaurants use Peeled Garlic from China and aren't aware of it. The U.S. also imports garlic from Mexico and Argentina. For the best flavor and quality and guaranteed food safety, I'd stick with California grown garlic.
post #4 of 9
:bounce:Long Live Gilroy (Calif.)!!!!!!:bounce:



~F-a- h
"Do not be careless with poor ingredients and do not depend on fine ingredients to do your work for you but work with everything with the same sincerity." --from the Tenzo Kyokun
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"Do not be careless with poor ingredients and do not depend on fine ingredients to do your work for you but work with everything with the same sincerity." --from the Tenzo Kyokun
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post #5 of 9
Worldwide there are currently 559 varieties of garlic known, with cloves ranging in size from the size of peas to as large as your thumb. There are two species, commonly known as softneck and hardneck, and the types are further broken down by the configuration of the cloves.

Until recently, virtually all the garlic sold in America was California White. This is arguably the worst choice for "fresh" garlic. But it's the one the folks at Gilroy decided to use as their standard. The bulk of processed garlic---i.e., garlic powder etc.---still comes from Gilroy.

Now we import garlic from a number of other countries, including China, Mexico, Peru, and Argentina. Although some of the varieites exported by those countries are better choices, in terms of flavor and usefullness, there is no quality control. Result: An increasing incidence of bad garlic: rotted cloves, insect biten, inproperly cured, etc.

For restaurants and home cooks who grow their own gardens, garlic is a good choice. It's easy to grow. It's low maintainance. And, while it is subject to some pests and diseases, they are relatively rare (onions actually suffer more) and, in general, easy to control.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks folks. KY--Our suppliers come from all over: garlic from Mexico, cheese from Argentina, tomatoes from Turkey, olives from CA and Greece, basil from FL and NJ, and olive oil from where????--and EVOO, Ha! but definitely "Packed in Italy"!

lobsterpot1
post #7 of 9
Just a quick comment here about imported foods (not being caustic/critical but only trying to make point :) )....where does your Parmigiano Reggiano come from? And the only true classic caviar?

There are many many foods that also didn't appear in various countries until the last few centuries, e.g. tomotaoes, potatoes, chillies. They may be grown now in your country, but may not have been an indigenous plant.

Food travels. It's up to the individual to judge whether it is good quality or not. Don't like it - don't buy it. Where you can, buy quality. If not, get the best you can.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi. We don't use Parmagiano Reggiano--Troppo caro --we use the transplant Italians' (to Argentina) version known as Reggianito.

regards,
lobsterpot1
post #9 of 9
I like the purplish garlic that I get here. I don't know where it's from, maybe multiple places, but I've always liked it.
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