or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Favorite Crustacean to eat?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Favorite Crustacean to eat?

Poll Results: What is your favorite crustacean to eat?

 
  • 18% (5)
    Shrimp
  • 40% (11)
    Crab
  • 33% (9)
    Lobster
  • 7% (2)
    Prawn
27 Total Votes  
post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
I know this is a broad question, but well I'm curious to know what the chefs around here are into.

Mine used to be shrimp, but these days I've become a bit of a lobsterhead.
post #2 of 35
Thread Starter 
oops, sorry about the repeat threads. I'm new to creating polls :blush:
post #3 of 35
do note you have the ability to delete your own posts.

and what's with the lighting etc advert? are you here to cook or advertise?
post #4 of 35
Of those listed I would have to say crab. But if you'd of included crayfish, they'd have gotten my vote.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #5 of 35
Kitchen Sink,

When you click oin the edit button, two boxes appear. The top one asks you about deleting the message. It defaults to "do not delete."

Just click on the "delete" button, add a reason if you want, and go on from there. That's all it takes.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #6 of 35
Depends on mood.
Currently it's crab, prior to that it was lobster.
Cleaning 500 lobster tails a night kind of takes the romance away though.
Give me a nice dungeness and I'm a happy bug eater.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
post #7 of 35
Thread Starter 
Hey, thanks for your help KYHeirloomer. That works when it isn't the first post of the thread, but I can't figure out how to delete the initial post. Perhaps only a moderator can do this...I don't know, but clicking edit on the first post is only allowing me to edit, it's not displaying the delete box.
post #8 of 35
TKS -

your private message shows up - it's a blank.

if you're here to yap on about things cooking, welcome.

please understand, these "purpose/topcial" places get overwhelmed with inane posters who have no interest in participating / contributing, but only to publish their web-site links - either directly embedded in the post or in 'signatures'

stuff like "lighting" and "plumbing" is highly suspect. why would anyone here need to know about your lighting products website?

if you want to talk cooking, let's git it on.

if you're looking to advertise your website(s), uhhhhh, mebbe not the best approach.
post #9 of 35
Thread Starter 
Sorry friend, I'm not trying to advertise anything. I don't know why the message showed up blank. I also don't know why I can't delete those other threads. Perhaps the forum is experiencing technical difficulties. You'll notice that I removed the links from my signature so as to not offend you or anyone else any further.
post #10 of 35
I voted crab only because you didn't have Oyster, Moreton Bay Bug, mussels, Razor fish, Abalone, yabbie or scallop.

Crab is the only one on the list for me that has much flavour - lobster, highly over-rated. Certainly overpriced.

For me - oysters every time. Raw.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #11 of 35
Hi, KitchenSink --

I took care of deleting the excess threads for you. :) That's something only mods can do (KYH forgot that what he can see on his screen and do are different from what members without his superpowers can see and do. :lol:)

Back to your original question: Whichever I'm eating at the moment. :D Well, maybe not barnacles -- I had those in a great restaurant in Dallas, TX of all places -- and they were just okay. But give me any other crustacean and I can be happily occupied for hours. :lips:

Oh -- and for those who wish you had included creatures like oysters or scallops: according to the fourth edition of The New Food Lovers Companion, "crustacean" is defined as:
You also have to take into consideration that some crustaceans with the same name are different in different parts of the world. The Australian lobsters DC Sunshine finds lacking are not exactly like an American lobster from New England. Then again, here in the U.S. our mudbugs (aka crawfish aka crayfish) are different from DCS's Moreton bugs. As far as I'm concerned, they're ALL good.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #12 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks Suzanne. Perhaps I should've included crayfish before prawn.

DC Sunshine, I always considered those to be mollusks, which is why I didn't include them. Squid is my favorite mollusk.
post #13 of 35
Wouldn't langostinos fit as crustaceans as well?

The suprise to me is barnecles. I'd have thought them to be mollusks, more related to, say, abalone than to lobster.

And what about sea urchin? Where would that fit?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #14 of 35
Thread Starter 
According to wiki, sea urchin are related to "sea cucumber" and some other obscure sea-dwellers. Basically, just because it has a shell doesn't mean it's a crustacean.
post #15 of 35
While I love the taste of lobster, I'm concerned about dietary issues.

I happened to see a vignette with Alton Brown a few nights ago on over-fishing and the possible substitute of using crayfish, or crawfish. To my knowledge, while I may have eaten gumbo a few times, I have never eaten crawfish.

This brings up a good point. If you simply like the taste, and crawfish is a direct substitute, would switching over have the same dietary effect?

And if the conditions are favorable, just exactly how do you procure enough crawfish for making meals for several people? I do not see them for sale locally.
post #16 of 35
Check the freezer case rather than the fresh fish display. Also ethnic grocers particularly asian and latin often have them frozen or defrosted.
post #17 of 35
Or you can always trap your own in nearby streams and lakes.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #18 of 35
Lived in New England 12 years,off and on, and grew to love lobsters; had never heard of Dungeness crabs. In the Navy, lived in Norfolk and we caught our own blue crabs. Really good, but really hard to get the meat out. You could sit down with 500 pounds of well-cooked Blue crabs and starve to death before you could get enough to eat!

Wound up in a house on Puget Sound, caught Dungeness crabs in the front yard and found out what really good seafood is. I'll take Dungeness any time, over anything else I've ever experienced. Even better than fried calamari.

Mudbugs ain't bad either, especially if you suck the heads! :bounce: Learned how to do that in a roadhouse restaurant in Houma, LA.

Mike
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #19 of 35
Ok I stand corrected, confused, but corrected.

But still drooling over the thought of a fresh oyster :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #20 of 35
DC, I think your confusion comes from common usage. We tend to group ocean protein into two groups: finned fishes, and everything else. We call the second group "seafood," even though, technically, seafood should include finned fish.

What Kitchen Sink has done is ask about a specific subset of seafood; to wit, crustaceans. So, while shellfish such as oysters are indeed seafood, they are part of a different subset.

Now I've either cleared things up or really confused you. :D
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #21 of 35
Gee tah KYH.....now that helped :p
Hehe....I just love the stuff, call it what you like. I is not fussed.

I see crab is in the lead by a short claw...it doesn't have a head as such. Go Crab!!!

(Oh now someone is gonna tell me they technically have a head....grrrr :) )
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #22 of 35
Thread Starter 
I've also never eaten crawfish, but if they're anything like lobster I'm sure I'll like them just fine...well, add it to the list
post #23 of 35
I'm sure I'm in a minority on this, but I actually prefer crawfish to lobster.

Nothin' like bitin' tails and sucking heads!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #24 of 35
KitchenSink-

Seriously - you should get ahold of some crawfish and a good recipe and find out what they're about. They are better than lobster. You can get frozen crawfish tails (but then you don't get to suck the heads - never mind - you need to head pretty far south to find them whole.)

They are a wonderful seafood; sustainable, and entirely politically correct.
They are "farmed" more or less, in rice fields from southern Missouri southward to the Gulf, to say nothing of the bayous.

Mike :chef:
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #25 of 35
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info Mike...will do
post #26 of 35
I voted crabs to as crawfish isn't on the list. Oysters on the Half Shell would be close second. For those who have never had crawfish, the ones imported from China that many places sell don't hold a candle to a fresh Louisiana crawfish and would probably turn a few away. They are pretty nasty overall. If you do try an import and like it you will go crazy over Louisiana crawfish. I don't think many Louisiana crawfish make it out of the area though as we eat them all. :lol:
post #27 of 35
Just so happens that Emeril just did a whole program devoted to the Art of the Crawfish...

Mudbugs and Cajun Cooking : Emeril Live : Food Network

And, as KYH said above, you can catch your own almost anywhere in the country- I've caught enough for a small meal in a stream on the Olympic Peninsula, which is a long way from Cajun Country. :bounce:

Mike :chef:

and... Michael Chiarello just demonstrated what sound to me like a great shrimp recipe -

Shrimp Po'Boys with Angry Mayonnaise Recipe : Michael Chiarello : Food Network
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #28 of 35
Well, if shellfish were included, it would be hands down abalone, followed by oysters and dungies tied for second place. Love Louisana cray fish and the right coast blue carb. As far as crustaceans, our Southeast Alaska prawns and the little salad shrimp from near Petersburg.
Not real crazy about king crab or lobster??
Nan
post #29 of 35
Shipscook, do you really want to bring up those spotted prawns? :D

Sorry, guys. Private joke.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #30 of 35
Some day by ****, we'll figure a way to get them from Alaska to Kentucky.
Season starts soon!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Favorite Crustacean to eat?