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Possible topic.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
A few days ago I mentioned that Chinese cleavers may well be the next fad thing, if they are not already. One of my suppliers has offered them for years.

Would this be a topic that you would like to pursue?

I believe Phaedrus is more knowledgeable with their actual use. However, I know the sharpening end of the debate, as well as a gentleman who builds fixtures that excel in their honing.

Not only might this topic be a lively discussion, but it might also introduce procedures that some of the forum members had never considered.

If you think the idea is fun I'll PM Phaedrus, we will research the topic more thoroughly and start a new thread. But feel free to jump right in and tell us just what aspects of the topic you'd like to see.
post #2 of 7
You are a little late a lot of us have been using for years. I know I started using in the early 80s.:bounce:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 7
I don't see sharpening it any different than other knives really. There are some monstrously expensive ones out there as for any other knife. And some really good inexpensive ones.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Each cutting tool sharpens a tad differently. In the case of the cleaver, a wider stone which engages more of the bevel is the better choice.

Additionally, the friend I mentioned is considering taking unheard of fine grits, like 15K and 30K, and adapting those stones to modern sharpening fixtures.

(Without hijacking my own thread, these uber-grit stones can shatter like a Ming vase, and require either painfully slow stone saws or water-jets. The polishing ability would be fantastic. Along with the costs...)

As for market penetration, as Ed points out, many folks have been using them for quite some time. However lots of people have never considered them.

And Ed, this might be a good example for you to mentor us in needs, problems, honing issues, the best brands, etc. I've never used one for my personal needs, and it seems like it would be fun. My guess is that other people might like to give it a whirl and perhaps try some exotic dishes prepared in a new way.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hey, guys, I just put my money where my mouth is.

I called JWW, and they are sending me a Chinese pattern laminate cleaver in their heavy blade model.
post #6 of 7
As we all know Chinese people are very practical and the use of the cleaver shows it. It is not only for cutting ,slicing or chopping, it can also be used for pounding products when held flat side down. It can also be used as a spatula, and when using a wok as a tosser. One tool 3 or 4 different uses and applications. We need a different knife for everything .Once a year I subject it to electric wheel for grounding down as I do my knives.:chef:
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks, ED. I think this is going to be quite a lively thread. Probably because it challenges and re-focuses "conventional wisdom."

I think we all give in much too quickly to urban legends and tradition. Many of the tools and products I use did not originate in the cutlery industry. I get the sense that some of us here might be utilizing diverse kitchen tools in some very unusual, but practical ways. We should have fun with that idea.

I also believe these enterprises free up the mind. If one of our chefs creates an entire meal using a cleaver, my guess is that he/she will ponder what else they can do by "coloring outside the lines."

Can you imagine a bunt cake made inside a Ford Mustang hub-cap because the pastry chef likes the imprinted design...
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