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Bouillon for Boeuf Bourgogne?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
One question regarding the referenced (Julia Childs)

So that I only need make the bouillon once for the receipe, can someone suggest a reasonable quantity of bouillon for her Boeuf Bourgogne?

Thanks,

Mark
post #2 of 18
Just saw the movie, eh? :lol:

That's one of those ingredients that is always good to have on hand, so the more you can make, the better. You can always portion out and freeze the rest.

(Sorry, I'm not home so I can't check how much is called for in the recipe.)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 18
How much do you want to make???????:bounce:
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post #4 of 18
if you're making the stock and not using boxed. (which, of course, I'd recommend, but the other is always an option for those who can't take a few days to cook a meal) then simply make as MUCH as you can fit in your biggest pot and store in your freezer.
post #5 of 18
HOME, I WOULD ALSO USE THE BOX.:bounce:
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post #6 of 18
Ok, Tell me again why you can't use beef stock
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure the folks saying to use (or okay to use) the box were talking to me...but, my wife insisted that if I was going to go to the effort to do this thing, then I ought to do the thing 'right' and create the bouillon from scratch. Since I'm in no rush to do this and am looking upon the effort equally as an experience and a result, I'm going to try and do all as she states in the receipe as best as possible.

I'll make a bunch of the bouillon. There's also a good chance that I'll be back before I'm through with this thing :-).

Mark
post #8 of 18
I like your enthusiasm! just wanted to make sure if you are going to make your own stock, that you might as well make a whole bunch of it to use in other things.

believe me, I share your enthusiasm too. Here is a post of mine that might help you out
Choose Life.: Taking Stock

I didn't use Julia Childs recipe for stock, im not sure if its any different from what I did.

Edit: just checked, I roasted my bones before making my stock, Julia doesn't but the rest is pretty much the same.
post #9 of 18
For a different twist I make stock from BBQ beef rib bones along with the standard soup bones. Adds a nice smokey background.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
What a fantastic (stock) link! I commend *your attention to thoroughness and am certain the result was well worth the effort.

Later--

Mark
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
While the Beef Bourguignon is in the oven, here's a few problems/questions/comments.

1. Next time I'll be using Pacific beef stock + added stuff.

2. Regarding the browning of the small onions in olive oil/butter and adding the bouillon/wine...I got hammered with crackling spatter both times! What did I do wrong?

3. Although I did brown the beef and [separately] the carrots and onion, I probably didn't brown the beef enough. I was running out of the leftover_in_the_pot bacon fat and olive oil and, not knowing if I could add more oil, had to limit the time the beef stayed put. Probably next time I'll just add more oil.

4. Even though I put the beef in the oven, after adding flour, for 4 minutes and 4 minutes more, I do not think my beef got the necessary texture for two reasons. First, we didn't have a 3" deep by 10-11" wide pot. The one I used was probably 7" or so inches deep. Also, our oven may not be as hot as hers? Not knowing where 'right' was, I just carried with the receipe's times.

5. I did a good job with the mushrooms (following her instructions on a later page) and the same for the onions (despite the spatter attack).

Connie and I are patiently awaiting the outcome!

Is this dish what we would call pot roast?

Mark
post #12 of 18
Hehe

welcome to browning, frying, and adding things with a high water content to hot oil. You can try to dry things before putting them in the oil, or, lower your oil temp....but......well....

Brown it Brown it.


not sure on your other questions/points.

Thanks for following up!! let us know how it turns out. Many folks come on here, and ask, get, run, never to return!
post #13 of 18
it very quick and cheep to go to your local butcher , by some scraps and a few marrow bones to make a proper stock. it's so easy to do, and save extras in the freezer, but it makes a huge difference in outcome. i hate boullion cubes. always has a salty almost tinny taste to it.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Have you tried the Pacific (I think that's the name) brand that's in a box and in the organic section? I'm very sensitive to salt which is not a problem with Pacific. My wife uses the brand all the time (mostly the chicken).

Mark
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Although (as mentioned before in retrospect) the beef could have had a more textured exterior--the meal was (and remains given the leftovers in the fridge) an absolutely deliciously fantastic effort!

The book is still out on a kitchen counter since I plan on cooking another meal--just not at the moment and once I've figured out what.

Mark
post #16 of 18
Although the procedure in a lot of cases is along the same lines, you are not making a Pot Roast, you are doing a stew or goulash .As will learn as you go further into cookery , every nationality has a dish that almost every other one has yet calls it a different thing. ie , pot roast=beef a la mode/ crepes=blintzes/ meat balls=quennels / meat loaf=a form of pate, and on and on.:chef:

P/S . Although this beef in burgundy is good, there are other ways to make it, and maybe even simpler.
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post #17 of 18
This thread has me wanting beef b now! I think I will have to put it in the crockpot for tomorrow's dinner after the museum! I think I'll even set the bread machine to do a loaf of bread so it's ready for 6pm!
OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #18 of 18
canned beef broth kinda sucks

but not nearly as much as boullion cubes

i usually use chicken stock and red wine- cook's illustrated puts swanson low sodium at the top[ of the list, and it is also one of the less expensive ones

nobody has caught me yet

were i to make french onion soup, i would simmer unbrowned beef slowly in chicken broth, then add that to the caramelized vegetables
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