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Question on the sear-to-oven method of cooking meat

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
So, as some of you know by my recent posts, I really love doing it this way... but I'm not sure I fully understand when (or why) you would finish the meat in a hot oven (say, 400-500 deg.) vs a cooler one (say, 325-400). Are there any rules or guidelines on this "finishing meat in the oven"?

Thanks.
I excel at sauteeing onions.
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I excel at sauteeing onions.
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post #2 of 8
I guess it depends on how thick or how tender your meat is. Say, if you are roasting a thick cut of meat, if the temp is too high, by the time the centre is cooked (say medium), the outside might burn. Tough cuts of meats are usually cooked at a lower temperature for much longer to make it tender, so that it has time to break down some tough molecule (is it the sinew?) thingies in the meat (braised or slow-roasted).
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
so for thicker cuts, unless you want well done, use a more gentle temp, right? ok.got it.

Last night a did two sirloins, almost 2" thick. I gave them a really nice sear in my cast iron pan, then finished them off at 450 to give me med-rare and med for the wife. sound ok? or should the heat have been hotter or cooler?

another time i was watching alton brown and he did a beef tenderloin. seared it, then let it cool, the finished it (I think) really low, like 300 or soemthing. he said that was because he wanted a very large portion (cross section) to be med rare, and if they used a higher oven temp, the cross section of med rare would have been much smaller as the heat cooked the outer layers....

sound right? thanks!
I excel at sauteeing onions.
Reply
I excel at sauteeing onions.
Reply
post #4 of 8
Becase when you set the oven to 425F and open the door it drops the temp. down to 375F. Well maybe, unless you have a nice oven stone or a convection that can come back up to temp quick.
post #5 of 8
Honestly, there are few uses for high temperature roasting when you're trying to cook a piece of meat to rareish donenesses. Mainly for restaurant cooking it's to speed up the cooking times... you normally can't afford to put a steak into a 300 degree oven and wait 20 minutes for it to finish.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
That' makes perfect snse, Blue. I kinda figured that in the back of my mind, but it's good to hear someone confirm. So I guess in general, lower and slower is usually better or preferable? (in most cases, when you have time)
I excel at sauteeing onions.
Reply
I excel at sauteeing onions.
Reply
post #7 of 8
I almost always finish at 350. Nothing special about that number but by always using the same temp you get a better feel for how to adjust time of cooking for thickness of meat. You know, 2 variables instead of 3.
post #8 of 8
I have been finishing at 275. The meat seems to retain more moisture that way.
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