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Avocado puree

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
How long can I keep an avocado puree before it darkens? Say, I puree it with some lemon juice, salt & cream. Would the lemon juice be enough for preventing it from oxidising?
post #2 of 14
The puree will keep for a couple of days at most. If you want it to last longer I suggest you store it in a vacuum bag or canister (such as a foodsaver).
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 14
It also helps if you put plastic film directly on the surface.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 14
yes, those methods both work. however for longer time, it works to puree with lemon and freeze. There was some debate on this on another forum, about 50/50 on preference. I seldom have leftover avocado but purchase both frozen puree and guacamole from Sysco.
At home if I have it leftover and it is a half, I just remove seed and brush good with lemon juice and put it cut side down on a saucer.
Curious, what is the purpose of the cream?
Enjoy,
Nan
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Well, basically I wanna make a "chicken & avocado" salad as one of my entrees. Shredded roast chicken, mix in some red onions, cherry tomatoes, capsicum & cilantro with a lime vinaigrette. Have the puree in the centre of the plate mount the chicken mix inside a ring on the centre, with some micro greens on the top...

Um.. oh yeah, the cream. Lots of recipes I came across use some cream, so I'm thinking it's used to adjust the desired consistency of the puree while maintaining its creaminess. I gotta do some experimenting first :).

Oh, a friend of mine told me that keeping the seed with the avocado mix (guacamole or puree) helps as well. Any truth in that?
post #6 of 14
My Avocado . tree has a load on there now, I freeze the puree with lemon and dash salt. By leaving seed in ,you expose less flesh to air(only the tops of both sides) wrap real tight in plastic wrap Florida av. however in my opinion are not as good as the California Haas type , not as much flavor. If adding cream, if you meant sour cream that's good to as the acid in it stops oxidation of the avocado. I keep in fridge 4-5 days.:chef:
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post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Ed. 4-5 days should be plenty of time.
post #8 of 14
For those with Avocado trees, the BEST way to store Avocados is ON THE TREE! Avocados will NOT ripen while they are on the tree, they just "hang there" until someone picks them or the wind blows them off the tree.

Once the stem separates from the tree, the ripening process commences, cold storage may slow the process but they WILL ripen.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #9 of 14
Pete
Maybe in California they don't ripen, but they sure do here. I have been growing them for 4 years and found if you leave on the tree, they get softer and fall off or the landscape guys steal them . I pick them when they are really hard. I put them near stove in my kitchen and they ripen sometimes takes 6 or 7 days. Then I put in fridge to retard further ripening. From what I gather only thing that does not ripen after picking is a pineapple, it rots if not caught just right, I grow them also.:chef:
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post #10 of 14
Ed,

I'm looking into this a little further, do you know what variety you have?

Interestingly, it seems that there must be something different between California and Florida avocados, almost without exception California references point to ripening AFTER picking while Florida references point to "on-tree" ripening.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #11 of 14
I have no idea but they are big, but like everything else here, stuff looks great and big like strawberries, tomatoes,basil but no flavor. Your climate promotes slower growth and more pronounced flavor, I also think elevation may have something to do with it, We are flat. also so darned hot and humid that rain is absorbed in an instant. The av.trees I have I grew from Av. pits from work. Very dark outside green bordering black, but hey the price is right.:chef:
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post #12 of 14
When its made and the lemon juice in it seal it good. Don't open until you need it and use it all. Once its exposed to air it doesn't last long......Bill
post #13 of 14
a little parsley puree will help the color w/o taking over the flavor, in my experience you lose the color within a day or two, even after being vacuum sealed.
post #14 of 14
You can use Vitamin C powder. It can be purchased at vitamin shops. It is used instead of lime juice to keep the avocado puree from darkening.
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