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Fresh Ravioli - how early can it be prepared?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I made some fresh spinach & ricotta ravioli a couple of nights ago, and while the outcome was fine, life could have been easier if I'd put the ravioli together a little earlier than I did.

My question is this: how far in advance can home made ravioli generally be prepared and stored before cooking?

What if any caveats should I be aware of?

Thanks.
post #2 of 16
Frozen 6 monthes wrapped well.
In Fridge about 1 week on a plate or pan sprinkled with cornmeal on bottom and wrapped.
Cooked then fridge about 4 days.:chef:
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Many thanks Ed for covering the bases - much appreciated. :)
post #4 of 16
When you freeze them, it's best to spread them out flat in a single layer on a cornmeal-sprinkled sheet, and sprinkle a little cornmeal over the top. Then when they're frozen, you can seal them in bags and they won't stick together. Cook from frozen -- they'll only take a tiny bit longer than from fresh.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 16
Andy Try deep frying them as an appi. Serve them with a Sauce Smitane they are out of sight. Oh yea Smitane is sauteed onion with a drop of heavy cream then finished with salt/white pepper and sour cream, sprinkle with chopped chives. Also goes good with Peroggi
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post #6 of 16
One other note... make sure you filling is on the dry side. If your filling is too moist, it'll seep into the dough and the ravioli will be very soggy... If I make them ahead of time, I freeze them to avoid that issue.

I do make a butternut squash stuffed one and the filling does have the tendency to stay moist.

And without a doubt.. corn meal!! It does help absorb the excess moisture as well.
post #7 of 16
If your worried about the filling.....just blanch them first!
post #8 of 16
my Fiance swears my homemade ravioli taste better, after I cook them from frozen!
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Excellent tips - thanks :)

I do have some polenta/coarse cornmeal, so I'll be sure to watch the moisture content and use that when I give freezing the ravioli a try.

I haven't even heard of deep frying ravioli or sauce Smitane - it sounds like an interesting way to go - thanks for the suggestion Ed.
post #10 of 16
How about Chocolate Hazelnut Ravioli with Raspberry Drizzle for dessert?:bounce:

PS/ When you make ravioli of any kind add a little panko breadcrumb to the filling as this absorbs and becomes part of the filling (it absorbs liquid) and stops them from breaking or throwing water after or while cooking.
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post #11 of 16
>I haven't even heard of deep frying ravioli or sauce Smitane <

Andy, a lot of what we do has to do with the name. If it's "ravioli" we automatically think of boiling it and then saucing. Which is fine.

If you think of it merely as a stuffed dumpling, however, all sorts of possibilities open up. You can boil & sauce. You can deep fry. You can pan fry. You can even bread them with an egg wash and crumbs, and bake in the oven.

Each method yields a different taste profile, even when starting with the same basic recipe.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
That's a new departure for me - I've never thought about pasta beyond it being part of a savoury dish.

I looked up Panko and I see it's crumbs made from bread without using the crusts. I also see it's sold in pre-packaged form - is there any advantage to using the pre-packaged over using home made breadcrumbs?

Hi KYHeirloomer :)

Thanks - I come from a very limited background when it comes to experiencing food - it's great just thinking about these new possibilities.
post #13 of 16
Andy,

Panko is a Japanese style breadcrumb, which is considerably coarser than regular crumbs.

While you can interchange them, the Panko does produce a different crust.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 16
Panko crumbs are available in any supermarket in regular and flavored (Italian style). They are coarser which is nice if you're trying to get crisp.

As a note, you can easily do ravioli as a dessert. To add to the sweetness, you can add some confectioner's sugar to the pasta dough... mix it well with the flour dry before forming your bowl for the eggs.

You can use lots of sweet fillings and warm sauces.

I have a friend, who's an owner/chef, in Perugia Italy who sent me a recipe for Chocolate Gnocchi with a ricotta mint sauce.... just amazing!!!

Buon appetito!
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Ah - thanks for the info, I think I've located a trusted supplier of imports from Japan that stocks Panko. All I have to do now is explain to my Wife that I need her to listen for the doorbell next week, as I'm expecting a shipment of breadcrumbs.:D
post #16 of 16
Go on the web and you will find Sauce Smitane, I very rarely make it, but for certain dished it is good.(Luchows Rest in NY always served it) I am not sure, but I think it could be a Russian based sauce due to the sour cream used. I know it is served in a Polish household when they make Peroggi's.(you can also fry them) As far as fried Ravioli, In New York, some of the hotels used it as a Hor's D. cause it came already made and was cheap.
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