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Please help to translate into english

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi,
I liked this vegetarian dish, any french speaking chef could you kindly translate into english for me. Here it goes:
Robe de Champs Multicolore "Arlequin"
Carotte jaune du Doubs, rutabaga jaune champion, betterave tonda di chiogga.

Thanks you
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #2 of 9
yellow carrots from Doub,rutabaga, mushrooms, (champignon)chiogga beets

I believe the bold words have something to do with fields
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 9
as far as i can tell they're ingredients. heirloom carrot, rutabega, and heirloom beets. it has been quite a while since i've been to france so my translation could be a little off.
post #4 of 9
Robe de champ - dress of the field ,ie my schoolgirl french. But when i asked my son, (whos a chef too) he said it was a posh baked potato.

Multicolore arlequin would be a colourful harlequin design. So perhaps theres a potato base with a lovely harlequin diamond shaped display of colourful vegetables.

Prob way out, but theres prob a recipe somewhere
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Translation

Great Chefs! thanks you very much.
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #6 of 9
Robe de chambre is a potatoe cooked in its skin [pomme robe de chambre=== potatoes in dressing gowns]
However robe de champs does translate to dress [gown] of the field which would suggest the vegetables are cooked in thier skins.
Carottes jaune du doubs
yellow carrots of daubs. 'jaune obtus de doubs' is a stumpy yellow carrot from doubs France
Rutabaga jaune champion
yellow swede champion. As far as i am aware there is no dish called champion, champion is the same in English and French so it a champion swede.
betterave tonda di chiogga.
this is a italiane beetroot from chiogga [near Venice Italy]
So Robe de Champs Multicolore "Arlequin"------
consists of French yellow carrots a champion swede and italiane beetroot uuhhmm bon apptit

Steve
masterchefin France
now at www.moulindelaville.com
post #7 of 9
I am french from Montreal and I agree with 'chefinfrance' as to the exact definitions of these vegetables. What I am curious about is the term, 'yellow swede champion'. The term 'champion' is the same like he said in both languages.

This dish is served here and is known as a multi colored array of root vegetables.
Normally if we were to remove the terms of where they come from, it would be : all miniature beets, rutabagas, and carrots, usually rubbed in butter and gently cooked.

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 9

A translation, sort of....

How about a semi-translation from a line cook? My French is pretty rusty but still serviceable, I think. I have to say I have no idea what all this describes, as far as an actual dish, BUT- Any vegetable "en robe des champs " has merely been cooked in its skin. "Carrotte jaune " and "rutabaga jaune " are yellow carrots and rutabagas, respectively, and " du Doubs " and "champion " would be varieties of these vegetables, I believe. " Arlequin " means harlequin, and also refers to things being multicolored. As for the rest, " multicolore " and " betterave tonda di chiogga " are not French at all; rather, they appear to be Italian. I realise this is probably not much help- as I said, it's a semi-translation. Looks like something sort of cobbled up, with the French and Italian thrown together.
post #9 of 9
Your definitions on these terms are great.

Felicitations !

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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