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Anyone got some good recipes for the Bernstein diet? - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
  •  
Basically the idea is to keep yourself in ketoses.


QUACKERY.!! If you go to a GOOD Doctor and ask him how to loose weight, he or she will tell you "Cut down on what you eat

 

Another old post resurrected.  Rather than get political I'll just relate some hard facts concerning dietary stuff.

 

Actually, very few doctors know anything much about diet in general, period.  So here are some interesting facts:

 

Many folks who overeat/are overweight have a condition known as Leaky Gut.  Here the small intestine has become inflamed and perforated, allowing undigested food into the bloodstream.  This not only causes many medical issues, but also contributes to metabolism issues and fat buildup.  And contributes to inflammation throughout the body, something diabetics in particular need to be concerned about.

 

The solution is a low-carb and low lectin diet.  So no significant amounts of grains, beans,seeds, nightshades (except modest amounts of cooked organic potatoes showing no green) or any other high-lectin foods.  Cut back on alcohol and vinegar.  Nothing much that is processed or added preservatives.  It should be noted that on a low-carb diet one must substitute cabbage (Sauerkraut preferably) and/or Jerusalem artichokes to balance intestinal flora.

 

On the up side I [personally] can have all the meat and animal fat I want.  :-)

 

I didn't reduce my overall eating one bit yet lost 20 pounds in the first month.  And I haven't felt this good in over a decade.  My cardiovascular is back up even though I haven't done much exercising lately, and I no longer get the sickly feeling of the last 6 years when I do exert myself.

 

But rather than clog this post with non-cooking stuff, please PM me if any of you have any questions here.

 

The OP was asking about recipes for a restricted diet, unfortunately he didn't get much feedback there.  But I have to say that when you're not particularly restricted on seasonings or techniques there is nothing about a restricted diet that really takes much imagination to get around.

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 2/25/15 at 8:44am
post #32 of 50
Ha.

Hows what people put in their own mouths it their own business on a public forum for Chefs?

What they put in their mouths is certainly our business haha(I just want to argue its been that kinda day). im judt kidding kinda dont bother argueing back please.

I found this an interesting read thanks for digging it up. I'll ask some dieticians about the matter see if they have good recipes for you.

Preach.
post #33 of 50

Thank you ChefboyOG - love the joke but as they say many a wise word spoken in jest!  This way of eating has reversed a sight threatening condition amongst other things, but is so restrictive that it tends to lead one down the route of trying to eat the familiar but using substitutes - most of which seem to involve soya.  Taste is what's going to keep us on track and any ideas or recipes will be most welcome.....

post #34 of 50

I'm not so sure that elimination of fat in this diet is as important as eliminating lectins, and I recommend the cooked no-green organic potatoes over the melba toast (potatoes loose most of their lectin when cooked), but I just now recall that 30 or 40 years ago a French chef developed techniques for reducing the fat content of traditional French recipes.  He called it Mincier (phonetically correct anyway), which I guess indicates small.

 

He said his motivation was loosing weight so the woman he loved would marry him, which he did, and she did.  He also lamented that the diet was not an adequate lifestyle for a true lover of French food, and recommended exercise to get off the diet once you lost the weight.  Ahahaha.

 

 

Rick

post #35 of 50

All right found it, excerpt from NY Times article:

 

The name "Michel Guerard" is emblazoned in blue on his starched white chef jacket, his checkered trousers are well creased. The three-star French chef who invented cuisine minceur preens under his pleated toque.

 

 

Rick

post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

He called it Mincier (phonetically correct anyway), which I guess indicates small.

In French, "mincir" (pronounced main-seer) means "to slim down". 

post #37 of 50

Yes, and minceur I now see means "slimming."  Guerard is apparently very clever at eliminating fat and still delivering taste and texture.

 

A note to Elizebeth, unfermented/unsprouted soy products are high in lectins, maybe better to stick with lean meat than soy-meat.

 

 

Rick

post #38 of 50

I suggest adapting Atkins recipes to reduce the fat.

http://www.atkins.com/recipes

 

For instance in this recipe

http://www.atkins.com/recipes/maehings-chicken-eggplant-casserole/10

 

use non-fat sour cream or yogurt, leave out the butter, use egg whites and use 2% cheese and reduce the amount or leave out if needed. It calls for 2 servings of bread but this makes 8 servings so maybe you can leave that in or reduce and use an accepted whole grain. 

 

Here's a good calculator to give you calories, fat, carbs, fiber, proten and sugars in foods.

 

http://www.calorieking.com/foods/

 

Here's another one where you can enter all the ingredients in a recipe and how many servings it makes. Then it will tell you the specs on each serving

 

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/recipe/calculator

post #39 of 50

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post #40 of 50

Argh. I don't trust anyone trying to make a name for themselves. No one who is good at bs.

 

I don't trust many book authors, "Doctor" Oz, Oprah Winfrey, people who have a convincing-sounding argument, salesmen, "nutrition supply" store, google searches, because on the subject of nutrition you will find a million sources to support what you are looking for. And that is a HUGE business. Billions. Oprah says if you eat carbs you are eating sugar, but I guess she doesn't realize that glucose, the product of digested complex carbohydrates like rice and wheat, is different from fructose or sucrose and it is metabolized differently. But she sounds good in front of the camera, right?

 

One source I do trust is /www.berkeleywellness.com/  They are peer-reviewed, and not selling anything except a university-approved publication that doesn't give much profit to any contributor. I trust people who are not making a lot of money and are humble enough to submit themselves to peer review.

 

There is a hell of a lot of money being made in nutrition "science" and nutrition BS. I don't think doctors and professors have it all figured out, but I think they have it figured out a hell of a lot more than the people trying to make a living selling whatever with no real stake. A professional nutrition expert can be shot down pretty fast for saying BS. A salesman or saleswoman can move on and make up another story.

 

I don't mean that everyone who has written a book is a quack. I mean that you have to be very careful of anyone who is trying to sell something. They might have it all together, but I think many of them are selling snake oil. I think the Bernstein diet is one of the more reputable ones.


Edited by OregonYeti - 2/26/15 at 7:28pm
post #41 of 50

Yeti, with all due respect something you should know - Universities are the ones who put out 99% of the schlock/pulp peer review literature.  They have their professors pumping out an article a month in many cases, just for university aggrandizement.  As many of our profs admonished us, 9 of 10 journal articles were not worth the ink to pen the first draft, and they actually admitted to contributing to this, and that most of their articles fit into the pulp category.  You should see what shanangans go on at Harvard medical school, particularly in their scam school of integrative medicine, allegedly dedicated to holistics, whatever that is suppose to mean, but actually just in business to make money peddling low-end alternative treatments at high prices.  I even had the director scared for a while of me exposing some of the schlock he encouraged, but in the end his damage control team correctly believed that his fellow doctors would not know enough of that particular field to call him on it.

 

There is considerable wisdom to what Bernstein says, even if he is not 100% right.  He's quite old now and may not be up on the latest that leading researchers in biochemistry and nutrition have done, but the average MD/prescription-pusher does know practically nothing here.  "Let food be thy medicine," as Hippocrates liked to say.  T.A.C.A. (autism related) is up on the latest here if any are interested.

 

Now, shall we get back to food and its preparation?  A couple things Guerard uses are foaming technique to liven up thin sauces, and adding various vegetable mouses to a dish in place of fatty ingredients, as well as creating a visual effect.  I think he'd be worth reading here, and apparently his used books are selling cheap on amazon.  Those are some nice suggestions mtullius

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 2/27/15 at 11:18pm
post #42 of 50

This post was deleted by Dr. Oz

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Edited by OregonYeti - 2/27/15 at 7:43am
post #43 of 50

I trust no doctors and I certainly trust no sales associates.  I've tried every diet every sold, WW, paleo, low carb, low fat, the cabbage soup diet, you name it.  My health and my body never agreed with any of them.

 

It wasn't until I started listening to my own body's needs and paying attention to how my body responded to the food I put in it that my body and health really took shape.  If you eat real food, not too much, move a little, and keep your stress levels under control then you are in good shape and don't need to go wild and crazy with restrictions.  Eating real food can help resist disease.  If you're already embroiled in health issues then it's too late for that, you unfortunately have to go down the punishment and restriction route.  It's sad but it is what it is.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #44 of 50

I like simple Indian food. I eat it a lot. That's what I grew up with and it makes me feel great.

 

How does this contribute to this discussion? Maybe not a lot. But I think it's a very healthy way to go. Rice, dal, bhaji, tandoori chicken, rogan josh, fruits, are all things that I love.


Edited by OregonYeti - 2/27/15 at 8:20pm
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post
 

How does this contribute to this discussion? Maybe not a lot. But I think it's a very healthy way to go.

I think it does contribute positively to the discussion. I find several Asian cuisines to be very healthy and yet satisfying. Namely Indian, Vietnamese and Thai. At least those are the ones I'm familiar with. 

 

I cringe at the idea of a sad plate of boneless skinless chicken breast with steamed vegetable and a tablespoon of boiled brown rice. 

 

On the other hand, nearly anything Indian tastes magical to me. And most of it is probably just as good to keep my waist small. And as a meat lover, give me a good (vegetarian) Malai Kofta and I'll be more than satisified!!

 

Tonight I made bowls of lettuce, white rice, fresh mint & cilantro, sliced cucumber, pickled carrots and daikon, charred/grilled pork that marinated in fish sauce/sugar/soy, sprinkled with crushed peanuts, served with Nuoc cham... I was in heaven, and so were the wife and kids. And the interesting thing is that I served about 1/2 the amount of meat I normally do, and everybody commented that there was a lot of meat! Asian cooking has some genius on that level. If you want to cut down on the amount of meat you eat, and still feel satisfied, go Asian.  

post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post
 

This post was deleted by Dr. Oz

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Whoever was responsible, deleting it was the intelligent thing to do.

 

Koukouvagia I trust you are doing much better since our last discussion, excellent!

 

 

Rick

post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

I cringe at the idea of a sad plate of boneless skinless chicken breast with steamed vegetable and a tablespoon of boiled brown rice. 

 

 

A lot can be done with these humble ingredients.  When you describe it like that it sounds awful but this is a weekly meal for me.  Ok sometimes the rice is farro or white rice with butter and the veggies might be roasted but don't knock it, it's simple good healthy food that hits the spot!

 

@Rick Alan I'm out of the weeds!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

 

Whoever was responsible, deleting it was the intelligent thing to do.

 

 

Rick

I humbly bow to your superiority.

post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
I cringe at the idea of a sad plate of boneless skinless chicken breast with steamed vegetable and a tablespoon of boiled brown rice. 

 

On the other hand, nearly anything Indian tastes magical to me. And most of it is probably just as good to keep my waist small. And as a meat lover, give me a good (vegetarian) Malai Kofta and I'll be more than satisified!!

 

Tonight I made bowls of lettuce, white rice, fresh mint & cilantro, sliced cucumber, pickled carrots and daikon, charred/grilled pork that marinated in fish sauce/sugar/soy, sprinkled with crushed peanuts, served with Nuoc cham... I was in heaven, and so were the wife and kids. And the interesting thing is that I served about 1/2 the amount of meat I normally do, and everybody commented that there was a lot of meat! Asian cooking has some genius on that level. If you want to cut down on the amount of meat you eat, and still feel satisfied, go Asian.  

 

Mmmm, I'm with ya. Sounds like a GREAT dinner.

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

A lot can be done with these humble ingredients.  When you describe it like that it sounds awful but this is a weekly meal for me.  Ok sometimes the rice is farro or white rice with butter and the veggies might be roasted but don't knock it, it's simple good healthy food that hits the spot!

Oh yes if you treat the ingredients right you can do something wonderful. What I was saying is "steamed" veggies and "boiled" rice (without butter or anything). Boring. But roast the veggies, grill the chicken and ad some butter to the rice, and I'm sure you can have a delicious meal. 

 

Having said that I have an aversion for boneless skinless chicken breast. To me it's the most boring part of the chicken. I never pick the breast if I can help it, but at least if I have a breast, I want the skin, and the bones! But give me a skin-on chicken thigh from a good quality chicken (hard to find) and I'm in heaven!

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