or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Kitchen working top

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
hi all!
im currently having this project about the standard height of the stainless steel working tops in the kitchen..

i wanna know whats your opinion on the standard height approved by the law or something about the height of the working table in our kitchen! :) i mean like..whats the appropriate measurements and the reasons behind it..and the ergonomic reasons behind it?

thanks in advance for your opinions..it is really appreciated! :):)!:chef::chef:
post #2 of 10
Just use the standard factory heights.

If you're tall, you bring 4 bricks into work and slip one under each table leg--they can be removed and put into youir locker at the end of the day.

If you're short, you get a shallow wood platform to stand on--again, this can be put away at the end of the shift.

Hope this helps
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 10
My "quick' answer is to match the height to the person doing the work.

If I'm not grossly mistaken, the "standard height" (USA) is 36", but I'm 6'-1" and I prefer 40"-42" for most work surfaces, otherwise my back kills me. My wife is 5'-3" and 36" works for her.

Interestingly, 40/73 = 0.54 and 36/63 = 0.55, maybe that is a "key ratio"?

Now, how do you adjust "standard heights" to varying users? See the previous post.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 10
cut 4 pieces of pvc tubing to the height needed to lift the table and slip over the legs. Lightweight and it works, I used it when I was BBQ catering to lift the portable table higher.
post #5 of 10
OK, I think we're "miing the question", I read that the OP is looking for informtion on legal standards and the ergonomic effect of work surface heights, not necessarily how to adjust the heightd, though those comment have been on the mark.

In California, to the best of my knowledge, there are NO government standards though the industry seems to have adopted 36" for most work tops.

Ergonomically, either a too low or a too high work top will cause problems, primarily, IMHO, in the back rather than the arms or wrists and highly dependent on the tasks at hand.

The "optimum" would be hydraulically adjustable work tops, but we probably couldn't afford them.

In our kitchen, I'm the ONLY cook, so the cooktop and worktops are set for MY comfort, 42", as such, my wife has a real difficult time.

Conversely, the FOH work areas are set at 36" which suits her and makes it miserable for me.

Is either one illegal? I don't think so.
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
LOL! thanks so much guys! ur replies are funny and cool! especially the brick suggestion LOL! makes sense though!

however it seems to me like the average height of most common work tables are 36" and 42" yea?

but how bout industrial standards? the standard height approved by the FDA or the USDA..im not sure which is the appropriate company though. im wondering whats the approved and certified height of kitchen working tables in the industry? the height is universally accepted and practiced :) sorry yea for the trouble guys :( :o
post #7 of 10
As far as I know there is no national law or federal regulation requring that kitchen work surfaces be at some particular height. Also, I'm not aware of any state regulation governing counter height. However, I'm no expert in this area and did no research before joining this thread.

The "industry standard" is 36". If you buy a fixed height work table, that's the height it will come unless you custom order. You might conceivably expose yourself to suit from an empoloyee if you varied too far from the standard and they suffered injury as a result of the deviation.

Pete's 42" counter is extreme. It's the sort of thing only an owner/operator can do for himself. It's a good thing to know what you like, neh?

I've heard of "Mutt and Jeff" stations set at 34" and 38" respectively -- in both commercial and residential settings.

BDL
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
BDL - wow really extensive info you got there! thanks man! i see i see..so the standard regulations are 36 eh..ic ic..dam..coz like for me..i suffer from short tables :( think i gotta use the brick idea now LOL! dont wanna die of weak bones later on :(! LOL!! although i would like the hydraulic height thing..very useful :P makes everyone happy lol! XD!:bounce:
post #9 of 10
You might try searching the OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) if the U.S. government (dept. of Labor?). They should have standards there, I would think.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #10 of 10
For commercial applications, you've already gotten your answers, I think.

For home setups, you can do what you want on this one. At least in Massachusetts, and I suspect elsewhere, the building code determines an awful lot of things in a kitchen, but counter height isn't one of them. It's more about placement of outlets and things like that.

However, anything nonstandard can lower the selling price of your house. The point being that if someone who wants standard 36" counters looks at buying your house, she's got to factor in the additional cost of lowering the counters. Depending on equipment and setup, that's also going to mean lowering the sink, the stove, and so on.

Note that there are likely to be strict code issues about the stove: if you're raising a stove, you've got to do it in an approved fashion.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews